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Coal Pit Lane


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I can't find if this has been discussed before.

Coal Pit Lane, now Cambridge Street. Presumably it was called Coal Pit Lane for a reason (although the 1771 Fairbanks plan gives the alternative Cow Pit Lane).

So, where was the coal pit?

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I can't find if this has been discussed before.

Coal Pit Lane, now Cambridge Street. Presumably it was called Coal Pit Lane for a reason (although the 1771 Fairbanks plan gives the alternative Cow Pit Lane).

So, where was the coal pit?

Chris Darmon of the Nationwide Geology Club should have access to Geological maps of the area, maybe we can spot coal seams ? I don't think they were "digging" as in deep mines, more collecting the coal near the surface where it cropped-out. As was the case at Ore Pits which became Pitsmoor.

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Chris Darmon of the Nationwide Geology Club should have access to Geological maps of the area, maybe we can spot coal seams ? I don't think they were "digging" as in deep mines, more collecting the coal near the surface where it cropped-out. As was the case at Ore Pits which became Pitsmoor.

The ultimate "Then and Now" Sheffield now, Sheffield as a Carboniferous Swamp approximately 280 million years ago at the centre of Pangea or Gondwanaland somewhere south of the equator ! lol

There is a book "Geology of the Sheffield Region" - used to have a copy - 30+ years ago !

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POPPYCHRISTINA

I can't find if this has been discussed before.

Coal Pit Lane, now Cambridge Street. Presumably it was called Coal Pit Lane for a reason (although the 1771 Fairbanks plan gives the alternative Cow Pit Lane).

So, where was the coal pit?

I used to have a copy of Kellys 1839 which I lent out and never got back. It said there was a coal mine at the top of West Street. Normally you can tell where a pit used to be because of an open area of land but I cannot think of one on West Street.

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Good old Leader has an early Sugar refiner at the bottom end quite early on.

---------

Extract

James Bennet, the staunch upholder of Methodism in its first days,

and the friend of the Wesleys and Whitefield, was a grinder His son

Edward, who was brought up to the same trade, went to London, and was

employed at the Tower, repairing and polishing the armour. While

there he married Mrs. Dubois, with whom he lived in Fleet Street

engaged profitably in making portable soup for exportation. Somehow

he fathomed the mysteries of sugar refining, and, returning to Sheffield

established, in spite of many difficulties, a business which became one of

the largest in the country, and brought him a considerable fortune. His

sugar-house, from a cask in front of which Whitefield has been known

to preach, was at the bottom of Coalpit Lane‹the east corner, that is, at

the Junction of Union Street. The site is now thrown into the widened

street, but the state of the Moorhead in 1737 may be judged from the fact

that a smithy and barn near by, also owned by Mr. Bennet, were

described as " upon the waste.'' Edward Bennet withdrew, about

1780, from Nether Chapel, and built Coalpit Lane Chapel. There he

officiated as pastor, though still carrying on his business as a sugar

refiner, until his death in 1788. Aided by a bequest he left for the

purpose, Howard Street Chapel was built, and the congregation migrated

thlther in 1790.Source

----------------------

Advice for new Members, if you haven't read Leader, go and read it - all of it, then read it again !

http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry...effield/ch1.txt

http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry...effield/ch2.txt

etc etc down to http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry...effield/ch16txt

There may be questions later !!!!!

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  • 1 month later...
Guest Gramps

I remember reading recently but can't remember where, that one of the 19th. century Chapels or Churches built in that area had to be built on piles because of the old coal workings under the site.

If I come across it again I'll remember this thread....hopefully.

Edit:

Found the church but it it's too far from Coal Pit lane....

"St. Judes Eldon street, erected in 1849....the site included a partially worked coal mine and the church is reared on 33 stone pillars rising from the bottom of the mine."

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RichardB

I remember reading recently but can't remember where, that one of the 19th. century Chapels or Churches built in that area had to be built on piles because of the old coal workings under the site.

If I come across it again I'll remember this thread....hopefully.

Edit:

Found the church but it it's too far from Coal Pit lane....

"St. Judes Eldon street, erected in 1849....the site included a partially worked coal mine and the church is reared on 33 stone pillars rising from the bottom of the mine."

Interesting enough even if its not the right spot - St Judes/Eldon Street on a map please anyone ? (For new Members benefit).

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RichardB

I can't find if this has been discussed before.

Coal Pit Lane, now Cambridge Street. Presumably it was called Coal Pit Lane for a reason (although the 1771 Fairbanks plan gives the alternative Cow Pit Lane).

So, where was the coal pit?

Here's a link needs fixing ...

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SteveHB

Here's a link needs fixing ...

Give it a try now boss,

and my thanks to Stuart0742 for helping me out regarding repairing broken links

:)

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  • 7 months later...

I can't find if this has been discussed before.

Coal Pit Lane, now Cambridge Street. Presumably it was called Coal Pit Lane for a reason (although the 1771 Fairbanks plan gives the alternative Cow Pit Lane).

So, where was the coal pit?

I heard a talk by David Hey this week, and he reckoned there were bell pits in the area.

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I heard a talk by David Hey this week, and he reckoned there were bell pits in the area.

There is an entry in the Burgery accounts for 1587 of 2/7d paid to the constable for the burying of a 'poore man that Dyed at the Coalepyttes'. The use of the plural does suggest bell-pits although the difference in height between Moorhead and Barkers Pool is about 30 feet so drift mining into the slope would also have been possible.

The first mention of 'Colepitt' lane in the Burgery accounts is in 1674.

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  • 3 months later...
ukelele lady

I used to have a copy of Kellys 1839 which I lent out and never got back. It said there was a coal mine at the top of West Street. Normally you can tell where a pit used to be because of an open area of land but I cannot think of one on West Street.

Would this be the pit POPPYCHRISTINA ?

This one is of the Springfield Coal Pit , off Broomhall Street and Fitzwilliam Street.

It is just a small section of the 1851 map.

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ukelele lady

Do I know the 1851 map ??

I forget the name but I know exactly where to find it to view in the Local Studies.

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Would this be the pit POPPYCHRISTINA ?

This one is of the Springfield Coal Pit , off Broomhall Street and Fitzwilliam Street.

It is just a small section of the 1851 map.

Seems to put it where Glossop Road baths is/was

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ukelele lady

Seems to put it where Glossop Road baths is/was

Yes more or less but still you've got Coal Pit Lane much further down ?

But then again, in those days I suppose everything was more spread out and not as congested as today.

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  • 2 weeks later...
dunsbyowl1867

Yes more or less but still you've got Coal Pit Lane much further down ?

But then again, in those days I suppose everything was more spread out and not as congested as today.

Looking at Steve's posting of the 1853 map in another post and comparing to the 1905 Godfrey map

1853

The coal pit must have been in the block now bounded by Fitzwilliam Street, Convent Walk and Cavendish Street. In 1905 Cavendish Street runs North / South along the length of the convent grounds. This must have been built along the convent wall section after the pit closed which must have been between 1853 and 1862.

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