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Jeremy

101 Green Lane

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In the list of pubs with no known keepers we have the Foundry Arms at 101 Green Lane. In the list of beerhouse keepers we have William Allen at 101 Green Lane. So I put 2 and 2 together and came up with 5 (keepers that is, though no mention of the name Foundry):

1881 (Census) Grocer's shop

1891 (Census) Joseph Baker, Railway Drayman, Sailte Yorkshire Beer House (Green Lane)

1893 (Kelly's) Thomas Moore, Shopkeeper & beer retailer (101 Green Lane)

1901 (Census) Samuel Clark, Inn Keeper, Wharncliffe Inn (101 Green Lane)

1905 (White's) William Henry Cooper, beerhouse (101 Green Lane)

1911 (Census) Herbert Allen, Publican, Wharncliffe Inn (101 Green Lane)

1911 (White's) Herbert Allen, beerhouse (101 Green Lane)

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In the list of pubs with no known keepers we have the Foundry Arms at 101 Green Lane. In the list of beerhouse keepers we have William Allen at 101 Green Lane. So I put 2 and 2 together and came up with 5 (keepers that is, though no mention of the name Foundry):

1881 (Census) Grocer's shop

1891 (Census) Joseph Baker, Railway Drayman, Sailte Yorkshire Beer House (Green Lane)

1893 (Kelly's) Thomas Moore, Shopkeeper & beer retailer (101 Green Lane)

1901 (Census) Samuel Clark, Inn Keeper, Wharncliffe Inn (101 Green Lane)

1905 (White's) William Henry Cooper, beerhouse (101 Green Lane)

1911 (Census) Herbert Allen, Publican, Wharncliffe Inn (101 Green Lane)

1911 (White's) Herbert Allen, beerhouse (101 Green Lane)

Any chance of an image for 1891 please, can't find it - more results than I can work with.

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Any chance of an image for 1891 please, can't find it - more results than I can work with.

I wasn't sure about this one. Terrible handwriting!

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I wasn't sure about this one. Terrible handwriting!

Had 20 minutes looking at it, lets await other opinions, I can't make it out.Tiny Wife thought the last two words were "Gravy Scone" !

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I wasn't sure about this one. Terrible handwriting!

I see it as you have got printed above.

Sailte Yorkshire beerhouse, Green lane in brackets.

Joseph Baker, wife Hannah etc etc.

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Sailte it is then; does the word have a meaning ?

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In the list of pubs with no known keepers we have the Foundry Arms at 101 Green Lane. In the list of beerhouse keepers we have William Allen at 101 Green Lane. So I put 2 and 2 together and came up with 5 (keepers that is, though no mention of the name Foundry):

Foundry came from Map 26 of Bank's Pub on every corner.

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Foundry came from Map 26 of Bank's Pub on every corner.

That likely confirms what I had assumed—Foundry is probably a more recent name. I'll just add the extra data to the Foundry listing and add links to it from the index for the other two names.

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In the list of pubs with no known keepers we have the Foundry Arms at 101 Green Lane. In the list of beerhouse keepers we have William Allen at 101 Green Lane. So I put 2 and 2 together and came up with 5 (keepers that is, though no mention of the name Foundry):

1881 (Census) Grocer's shop

1891 (Census) Joseph Baker, Railway Drayman, Sailte Yorkshire Beer House (Green Lane)

1893 (Kelly's) Thomas Moore, Shopkeeper & beer retailer (101 Green Lane)

1901 (Census) Samuel Clark, Inn Keeper, Wharncliffe Inn (101 Green Lane)

1905 (White's) William Henry Cooper, beerhouse (101 Green Lane)

1911 (Census) Herbert Allen, Publican, Wharncliffe Inn (101 Green Lane)

1911 (White's) Herbert Allen, beerhouse (101 Green Lane)

Wharncliffe Works, Green Lane ... opened ??

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Sailte it is then; does the word have a meaning ?

Just a possibility?? sailte could be from the Romany Gaelic i have found it mentiond in a Poem called

THE WICKED WHO WOULD ME HARM.

Gum bu gointe, gointe, geuire, gairbhe, guiniche e,

Na’n cuilionn cruaidh cnea-chridheach,

Gum bu gairge e na’n salann sion, sionn, searbh, sailte,

Seachd seachd uair.

Be it fiercer, fiercer, sharper, harsher, more malignant,

Than the hard, wound-quivering holly,

Be it sourer than the sained, lustrous, bitter, salt salt,

Seven seven times.

This is only a small part of the Poem,

The full version is at

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2077.htm

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Just a possibility?? sailte could be from the Romany Gaelic i have found it mentiond in a Poem called

THE WICKED WHO WOULD ME HARM.

Gum bu gointe, gointe, geuire, gairbhe, guiniche e,

Na’n cuilionn cruaidh cnea-chridheach,

Gum bu gairge e na’n salann sion, sionn, searbh, sailte,

Seachd seachd uair.

Be it fiercer, fiercer, sharper, harsher, more malignant,

Than the hard, wound-quivering holly,

Be it sourer than the sained, lustrous, bitter, salt salt,

Seven seven times.

This is only a small part of the Poem,

The full version is at

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2077.htm

As likely as any other explanation at this time Syrup.

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Sailte it is then; does the word have a meaning ?

I had a bit of a poke around for this one and found... Bono: Cead mile sailte! It's ancient gaelic...a hundred thousand welcomes in cyberspace! Source

Did breweries etc allow tennant's to name the pub themselves, if so it could be the tennant was of Irish descent and was issuing a thousand welcomes to all his customers? Just a thought :unsure:

On the other hand... Sailte - adj., salt, salted Source Unlikely though IMHO

Also... sail, g. -alaç, -aileaç, d. -alai÷, -aili÷, pl. -l÷e, -li÷e, -leaça, -

lte(aça), -altaça and -eanna (O’Leary), f., the willow-tree, an osier

sail is a noun; its genitive singular is salach or saileach; its

dative singular is salaigh or sailigh; its plural is sailghe,

sailighe, saileacha, sailte or sailteacha, saltacha, or

saileanna (this last is the form that Canon Peter O’Leary uses in

his writings), the noun is feminine, its primary sense is ‘a willow Source

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