Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
RichardB

Crozzle

Recommended Posts

Answers, sadly, only accepted by an up to date picture of some "Crozzle", preferably with a location too :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No descriptions of what "crozzle" was then, or photos of crozzle-topped walls ? :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one of the best crozzle topped walls was on Waterford road, sharp as razors

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neddy is so much closer, sorry Grinder Bloke, still not saying what it is. Would like a picture of Waterford Road, if the wall still exists ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No you're not likely to top a wall with the bits from your Fish and Chips are you ? Here's my wall complete with mushy-pea-remnants .... something very Sheffield, a container maybe, something that took extreme heat, something that became so hard-baked it lasted, even broken into bits, for lots and lots of years - equivalent of razor wire these days ... definately not a bit of old Cod :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neddy has sent me a picture of some crozzle atop a wall, near the Don - and not a chip or bit of Haddock in sight :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the photo again it looks like a group of crozzled heads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took this whilst I was down by the Don, not very good quality, cheap camera. Silvermills

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Answers, sadly, only accepted by an up to date picture of some "Crozzle", preferably with a location too :rolleyes:

Just been explaining to my wife (Lincolnshire lass) about the worrd crozzle. In my family it was always used to describe well done bacon. My dad tells me it slag produced in the steel making process and now I know its that funny stuff on the top of some old walls in Sheffield. lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crozzle always meant bacon to me too! I only found out the real meaning a couple of years ago. I was told recently that as part of work being done at the back of Aunt Sally's on Clarkehouse Road they needed to demolish a rockery cum wall made of crozzle, but it was so hard it defeated all attempts to break it up. The people trying to remove it decided only explosiives would do the job so in the end they left it there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wall by Brightside Wier is topped by crozzle as it says here! (Off the information board!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wall by Brightside Wier is topped by crozzle as it says here! (Off the information board!)

An explanation is given here.I have been meaning to post these photo,s for ages .

Taken on Doncaster Street ,off Shalesmoor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An explanation is given here.I have been meaning to post these photo,s for ages .

Taken on Doncaster Street ,off Shalesmoor.

Excellent what a wonderful phrase "a piecrust of wheelswarf" Sound like something Bilbo Baggins would eat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Came across a load of crozzle near the Northern General Hospital !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just been explaining to my wife (Lincolnshire lass) about the worrd crozzle. In my family it was always used to describe well done bacon. My dad tells me it slag produced in the steel making process and now I know its that funny stuff on the top of some old walls in Sheffield. lol

"Crozzled" was the only way my late mother would eat her bacon. (my mother's version of "crozzled", mind you, was pretty much cremated...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crozzle was the slag from the top of the old crucible furnaces.

from this the term crozzle was used to describe any burnt or overcooked food as being 'crozzled up.'

There are still quite a few walls in Sheffield with crozzle used as top stones.

The one that comes to mind is the wall alongside Earl Marshal Road.

As a matter of interest when the embankment was built across the Crookes Valley for the road up to Barber Road they used all the slag from the crucible furnaces 'Crozzle' as well as the pots.

If you look closely sometimes these can be seen on the recreation ground side of the of the embankment.

Hope this is helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×