Jump to content

Listed buildings


RichardB
 Share

Recommended Posts

What makes a building suitable for listed building status please ?

A Newcastle cinema (Odeon) has lost its listed status and is due for demolition. The Tiny Wife is enraged, I'm non-plussed - the building in question (1930's) is within an area known as "Grainger Town" where most buildings are listed, but date from the1830's/40's. I think it loses out due to its near neighbours status/age; she thinks I'm a $%^&^%$ !

I don't think age/beauty/function come into the equation as much as "Frog-Features" does, I think it's a combination of those plus how unique the buildings are. Modern buildings are "Listed" too, even if they are ugly/featureless/boxlike.

Are there modern Sheffield buildings that are listed please ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest 30_degrees

What makes a building suitable for listed building status please ?

A Newcastle cinema (Odeon) has lost its listed status and is due for demolition. The Tiny Wife is enraged, I'm non-plussed - the building in question (1930's) is within an area known as "Grainger Town" where most buildings are listed, but date from the1830's/40's. I think it loses out due to its near neighbours status/age; she thinks I'm a $%^&^%$ !

I don't think age/beauty/function come into the equation as much as "Frog-Features" does, I think it's a combination of those plus how unique the buildings are. Modern buildings are "Listed" too, even if they are ugly/featureless/boxlike.

Are there modern Sheffield buildings that are listed please ?

Call me sceptical, but I think the rule book gets chucked out the window all to often when a site is ripe for development. Never enough people complain and money talks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is from the English Heritage website :

"Listing is not a preservation order, preventing change. Listing is an identification stage where buildings are marked and celebrated as having exceptional architectural or historic special interest, before any planning stage which may decide a building's future.

Listing does not freeze a building in time, it simply means that listed building consent must be applied for in order to make any changes to that building which might affect its special interest. Listed buildings can be altered, extended and sometimes even demolished within government planning guidance. The local authority uses listed building consent to make decisions that balance the site's historic significance against other issues such as its function, condition or viability.."

Too often an owner will neglect a listed building until it becomes unsafe then apply for permission to demolish it, thus freeing up the site for redevelopment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...