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mammybear

Roundhouse, Ringinglow

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not sure if this has been mentioned before but can anyone tell me what the roundhouse was originally. i suspect it was a toll house of some kind am i right or totally off the mark. thank you.

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It was a toll house on the Sheffield-Buxton and Sheffield-Chapel-en-le-Frith turnpike. You can find out lots more about the local turnpikes in the article that Bayleaf posted here:

Sheffield Turnpikes in the 18th Century

Images of England have some info on the Roundhouse here:

http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/details/....aspx?id=456282

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It was a toll house on the Sheffield-Buxton and Sheffield-Chapel-en-le-Frith turnpike. You can find out lots more about the local turnpikes in the article that Bayleaf posted here:

Sheffield Turnpikes in the 18th Century

Images of England have some info on the Roundhouse here:

http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/details/....aspx?id=456282

If I remember correct at one time it had a sweet counter.

I remember someone living in it.

Does anyone know if Bents Green Lodge was anything to do with the toll road? Or any history?

I remember it when it was the open air school.

Bents Green Lodge

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If I remember correct at one time it had a sweet counter.

I remember someone living in it.

Does anyone know if Bents Green Lodge was anything to do with the toll road? Or any history?

I remember it when it was the open air school.

Bents Green Lodge

It was originally a coaching house and farm, serving the users of the turnpike and locals. It was originally an inn called the Sun. The commissioners responsible for surveying the area for the Enclosures based themselves there, and were met by a riotous mob from the town, resulting in the military being summoned from Nottingham to restore order.

It was the site of a tragedy that was the inspiration for a tragedy entitled " The House on the Moors".

The story concerned a proprietor, lnn landlord and farmer, who was of good reputation and hard working. But the time came when he became indolent and neglected his work. Eventually he took to his bed and became an invalid. Later he took to long rambles alone in the severest of weather. He continued to deteriorate mentally and physically. Eventually he asked for a clergyman, and confessed that one night, a carter had arrived at the inn, already worse for drink. After more drink he became abusive and was ejected. The Landlord followed him out, and a row ensued, during which the landlord struck the carter, then dragged him in front of his cart, and the horse and cart ran him over, killing him.

It was the landlord's conscience that caused his deterioration, and after his confession he died.

There's also a local legend that at certain times a ghostly coach and horses has been seen driving furiously out of the gates and off towards Ringinglow.

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It was originally a coaching house and farm, serving the users of the turnpike and locals. It was originally an inn called the Sun. The commissioners responsible for surveying the area for the Enclosures based themselves there, and were met by a riotous mob from the town, resulting in the military being summoned from Nottingham to restore order.

It was the site of a tragedy that was the inspiration for a tragedy entitled " The House on the Moors".

The story concerned a proprietor, lnn andlord and farmer, who was of good reputation and hard working. But the time came when he became indolent and neglected his work. Eventually he took to his bed and became an invalid. Later he took to long rambles alone in the severest of weather. He continued to deteriorate mentally and physically. Eventually he asked for a clergyman, and confessed that one night, a carter had arrived at the inn, already worse for drink. After more drink he became abusive and was ejected. The Landlord followed him out, and a row ensued, during which the landlord struck the carter, then dragged him in front of his cart, and the horse and cart ran him over, killing him.

It was the landlord's coscience that caused his deterioration, and after his confession he died.

There's also a local legend that at certain times a ghostly coach and horses has been seen driving furiously out of the gates and off towards Ringinglow.

A good storey.

It just seems that the lodge seems much grander in scale than a local post house or farm house as there were quite a few rooms at the top of the house for servants etc.

Anyone know when it was built and for whom?

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not sure if this has been mentioned before but can anyone tell me what the roundhouse was originally. i suspect it was a toll house of some kind am i right or totally off the mark. thank you.

As a child my grandma living in Ringinglow village, I remember her telling me that another relation lived in the roundhouse, in the hose there was a top floor that had no way of accessing it, and although there was no way up into the room, footsteps on the floor could often be heard.

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A good storey.

It just seems that the lodge seems much grander in scale than a local post house or farm house as there were quite a few rooms at the top of the house for servants etc.

Anyone know when it was built and for whom?

At the time of the Ecclesall Enclosures Award in 1788, there was already a house there, on part of the estate of Lord John Murray of Banner Cross Hall. The Turnpike was opened in 1758, and around 1785 He decided to turn it into an inn to serve the trade on the turnpike, who were no doubt pleased of a break after the climb out of Sheffield.

One part of the building has a date-stone 1774, and on another part is the arms of Lord John Murray.

So that part of the building with the 1774 date-stone was presumably the farmhouse already there when Lord Murray decided to turn it into a hostelry, and the bit with his crest is presumably his addition.

Either way, the place was sold in 1814 to Mr. Joseph Bishop, land agent & surveyor, whose representatives in turn sold it in 1829 to Mr. Albert Smith, Clerk to the Sheffield Justices, and he made extensive alterations.

It was later sold to Mr. Blakelock Smith, who also made extensive alterations, he being responsible for the house as it now stands.

In the early part of the 20th century it was the home of Mr. H. K. Stephenson, MP for the Park Division of Sheffield, and later the property of a Mr. J. M. Allan, who subsequently sold it to Sheffield Education Dept.

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At the time of the Ecclesall Enclosures Award in 1788, there was already a house there, on part of the estate of Lord John Murray of Banner Cross Hall. The Turnpike was opened in 1758, and around 1785 He decided to turn it into an inn to serve the trade on the turnpike, who were no doubt pleased of a break after the climb out of Sheffield.

One part of the building has a date-stone 1774, and on another part is the arms of Lord John Murray.

So that part of the building with the 1774 date-stone was presumably the farmhouse already there when Lord Murray decided to turn it into a hostelry, and the bit with his crest is presumably his addition.

Either way, the place was sold in 1814 to Mr. Joseph Bishop, land agent & surveyor, whose representatives in turn sold it in 1829 to Mr. Albert Smith, Clerk to the Sheffield Justices, and he made extensive alterations.

It was later sold to Mr. Blakelock Smith, who also made extensive alterations, he being responsible for the house as it now stands.

In the early part of the 20th century it was the home of Mr. H. K. Stephenson, MP for the Park Division of Sheffield, and later the property of a Mr. J. M. Allan, who subsequently sold it to Sheffield Education Dept.

Wow, well done on finding the info Bayleaf.

I remember the old walled garden and the greenhouses. It was used as a garden nursery for the education dept in the 60's

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It was originally a coaching house and farm, serving the users of the turnpike and locals. It was originally an inn called the Sun.

Sun Inn, Ringinglow Road, no known keepers. Listed as open from 1774.

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and later the property of a Mr. J. M. Allan, who subsequently sold it to Sheffield Education Dept.

James McNeal Allan, Managing Director of Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd, 1919 and 1925. (Called Bent's Green Lodge, if it is the same place)

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