Jump to content

One for the Chemists out there


Recommended Posts

Thanks for posting that madannie. I think Tom Lehrer is (was?) one of the cleverest performers I've heard. His songs are all very funny, but the bits in between in his performances are equally funny and often quite biting.

I like the black humour such as 'Poisoning pigeons in the park', and 'We'll all go together when we go'.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As a chemistry teacher I hear this regularly as its still on just about any video / DVD about the periodic table and the chemical elements.

There are several versions on YouTube and my favourite animation is one which starts off with a "blank" periodic table and it fills the elements in on it, in a fairly random pattern from a periodic trend point of view but in keeping with the order each element appears in the song.

I actually have this video clip and song downloaded onto my mobile phone, - how sad is that! :rolleyes:

As for Mr. Lehrer being very clever with his songs his song about mathematics "new math" (or maths if you are English rather than American) which is about subtracting two 3 digit numbers is extremely clever and funny, - like the elements one the pace is fast and its hard to keep up with his logical reasoning without the "chalkboard" video which appears with it. For another mathematical one which is a bit of light relief from this try listening to "That's Mathematics", just as quick but very funny.

Link to post
Share on other sites
madannie77

As a chemistry teacher I hear this regularly as its still on just about any video / DVD about the periodic table and the chemical elements.

There are several versions on YouTube and my favourite animation is one which starts off with a "blank" periodic table and it fills the elements in on it, in a fairly random pattern from a periodic trend point of view but in keeping with the order each element appears in the song.

I actually have this video clip and song downloaded onto my mobile phone, - how sad is that! :rolleyes:

As for Mr. Lehrer being very clever with his songs his song about mathematics "new math" (or maths if you are English rather than American) which is about subtracting two 3 digit numbers is extremely clever and funny, - like the elements one the pace is fast and its hard to keep up with his logical reasoning without the "chalkboard" video which appears with it. For another mathematical one which is a bit of light relief from this try listening to "That's Mathematics", just as quick but very funny.

Have to agree about Tom Lehrer - absolutely brilliant.

If I had a mobile phone with that kind of capability I would probably have it downloaded as well. Then again, I had a super Royal Society of Chemistry poster of the Periodic Table on my bedroom wall for many years - long after I finished my student days. It must be many years of working with solvents softening my grey matter :wacko: Maybe that's why I am Mad Annie

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have to agree about Tom Lehrer - absolutely brilliant.

If I had a mobile phone with that kind of capability I would probably have it downloaded as well. Then again, I had a super Royal Society of Chemistry poster of the Periodic Table on my bedroom wall for many years - long after I finished my student days. It must be many years of working with solvents softening my grey matter :wacko: Maybe that's why I am Mad Annie

OK, this is DaveH B.Sc. MRSC. C.Chem.

Is the RSC periodic table you are referring to the one that has pictures of the elements on (the so called "picture periodic table") it is about 120cm x 75cm, in colour and also has a paragraph or so of small print about each element alongside its picture telling you all sorts of things about it?

I also have an application on my mobile phone where you can select an element in a small periodic table and it will display several pages of both numeric and text information about it, - a sort of periodic table in your pocket!

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, this is DaveH B.Sc. MRSC. C.Chem.

Is the RSC periodic table you are referring to the one that has pictures of the elements on (the so called "picture periodic table") it is about 120cm x 75cm, in colour and also has a paragraph or so of small print about each element alongside its picture telling you all sorts of things about it?

I also have an application on my mobile phone where you can select an element in a small periodic table and it will display several pages of both numeric and text information about it, - a sort of periodic table in your pocket!

Very useful, I don't know how I manage without one of those lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very useful, I don't know how I manage without one of those lol

You would manage quite easily without one, - you don't teach chemistry.

So are you going to retrain as a teacher then?

If you retrain as a chemistry teacher I could bluetooth you my periodic table application to your mobile lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

You would manage quite easily without one, - you don't teach chemistry.

So are you going to retrain as a teacher then?

If you retrain as a chemistry teacher I could bluetooth you my periodic table application to your mobile lol

I was unsure, but that's just sold it to me lol

Considering e commerce at the moment, thats something for you to think about

Link to post
Share on other sites
madannie77

OK, this is DaveH B.Sc. MRSC. C.Chem.

Is the RSC periodic table you are referring to the one that has pictures of the elements on (the so called "picture periodic table") it is about 120cm x 75cm, in colour and also has a paragraph or so of small print about each element alongside its picture telling you all sorts of things about it?

I also have an application on my mobile phone where you can select an element in a small periodic table and it will display several pages of both numeric and text information about it, - a sort of periodic table in your pocket!

Clearly mobile phone technology has left me far behind. Mine does phone calls and texts and not much else!

Yes, it was the pictorial RSC periodic table. To think that without it I might never have known how erbium, terbium, yttrium, ytterbium got their names, etc. I still have it somewhere, but have no room on my walls for it any longer (far too many bookcases and artworks).

Mad Annie BSc and MSc but no longer MRSC CChem and not currently practising the dark chymical arts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Clearly mobile phone technology has left me far behind. Mine does phone calls and texts and not much else!

Yes, it was the pictorial RSC periodic table. To think that without it I might never have known how erbium, terbium, yttrium, ytterbium got their names, etc. I still have it somewhere, but have no room on my walls for it any longer (far too many bookcases and artworks).

Mad Annie BSc and MSc but no longer MRSC CChem and not currently practising the dark chymical arts.

Is this like qualification Top Trumps

Link to post
Share on other sites

Clearly mobile phone technology has left me far behind. Mine does phone calls and texts and not much else!

Yes, it was the pictorial RSC periodic table. To think that without it I might never have known how erbium, terbium, yttrium, ytterbium got their names, etc. I still have it somewhere, but have no room on my walls for it any longer (far too many bookcases and artworks).

Mad Annie BSc and MSc but no longer MRSC CChem and not currently practising the dark chymical arts.

Apparently all of these take their names from a single place in Sweden, where they were first discovered making it the place to have more elements named after it than any other in the World.

As for elements named after British places Strontium is named after a place in Scotland, but I don't think there are any others,

no Sheffieldium :o

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this like qualification Top Trumps

No, just a couple of chemists talking,

So if you wouldn't mind waiting until we have finished then we will try to read your doctors handwriting and get you your prescription, OK lol

Link to post
Share on other sites
madannie77

Is this like qualification Top Trumps

Having lots of letters after the name is not always a guarantee of success in life, as I am currently proving. I have disposed of the MRSC CChem bit (which was easy - I didn't renew the membership) but the other two have stuck, although I normally don't use them and get embarrassed when other people do.

As for elements named after British places Strontium is named after a place in Scotland, but I don't think there are any others,

no Sheffieldium :o

You are probably right about strontium - I bow to your superior knowledge of chemistry in general - I guess that being a teacher you have to retain far more knowledge of the subject than I have in my career (?) as an analytical chemist in industry.

Can't help thinking that Sheffieldium would be an alloy rather than an element, probably involving iron and carbon, and maybe traces of other metals such as chromium, vanadium and manganese.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Having lots of letters after the name is not always a guarantee of success in life, as I am currently proving. I have disposed of the MRSC CChem bit (which was easy - I didn't renew the membership) but the other two have stuck, although I normally don't use them and get embarrassed when other people do.

Likewise, I normally keep quiet about it, - but as the RSC was mentioned.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't help thinking that Sheffieldium would be an alloy rather than an element, probably involving iron and carbon, and maybe traces of other metals such as chromium, vanadium and manganese.

Hmmm... Sheffield Steel

Now there's a name to call something.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One for madannie

I had a look around at work / school and found out an old RSC picture periodic table for you. Temporarily pinned it up over another wall display and took a photo of it with my mobile phone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One for madannie

I had a look around at work / school and found out an old RSC picture periodic table for you. Temporarily pinned it up over another wall display and took a photo of it with my mobile phone.

The periodic table which normally adorns my lab wall (no chemistry lab is complete without a periodic table) is the latest Phillip Harris one.

Now if you are wondering why it is hanging from an electrical socket on a bit of string, here's the reason

If you turn it over on the back is a blank outline of the periodic table box structure but with no information about the elements at all

When I give the kids a test some of them try to cheat by looking things up on the periodic table on the wall. I turn it over before a test to stop them from "cheating" lol

Having said that anyone doing a GCSE or A level test will be GIVEN an official printed copy of the table to use for exam purposes as they get one in the real exams.

Unfortunately our Y11 have just done a mock GCSE exam and someone (not me) forgot to give them a periodic table :o

Link to post
Share on other sites

One for madannie

I had a look around at work / school and found out an old RSC picture periodic table for you. Temporarily pinned it up over another wall display and took a photo of it with my mobile phone.

I will make no comment on the quality :mellow:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will make no comment on the quality :mellow:

Had to take it while there were no kids about, - no one is supposed to use mobile phones in school (although everyone does)

I don't want to get done and sent to the headmasters office or put on detention for using a mobile phone in school lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

One for madannie

I had a look around at work / school and found out an old RSC picture periodic table for you. Temporarily pinned it up over another wall display and took a photo of it with my mobile phone.

Another one for madannie

This is my current "favourite" offering from the RSC.

The 2009 Visual Elements Periodic Table Data Sheet

No pictures of the elements or textual interesting facts, - but just lots and lots of data. An excellent A-level / HND / first degree version of the table.

This is not a wall display table it is on a laminated A4 card (copied it on the scanner).

This means they can put even more data on the back of it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As as chemist I just can't resist this. First heard it many years ago and have recently come across this animated version of "The Elements" by Tom Lehrer. Great stuff (after the introduction from the guy who created the animation)

http://www.privatehand.com/flash/elements.html

As madannie has titled this thread "One for the Chemists out there", apart from me and madannie just how many chemists are there who are members of Sheffield History?

Some of the members user names sound as though they have a chemical twist to them, -

Dick Dioxide?

THYLACINE?

nmr 1?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dickdioxide

Dickdioxide sings the following to the tune of the Adams Family.

( watch it here )

They're tiny and they're teeny,

Much smaller than a beany,

They never can be seeny,

The Atoms Family.

They are so small.

(snap,snap)

They're round like a ball.

(snap,snap)

They make up the air.

They're everywhere.

Can't see them all.

(snap,snap)

Together they make gases,

And liquids like molasses,

And all the solid masses,

The Atoms Family

Neutrons can be found,

Whee protons hang around;

Electrons they surround

The Atoms Family

They are so small.

(snap,snap)

They're round like a ball.

(snap,snap)

They make up the air.

(snap,snap)

They're everywhere.

Can't see them all.

(snap,snap)

And much much more at: chemsongs

PS Father, 2 brothers, 3 nephews/nieces and 2 daughters are chemists.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dickdioxide sings the following to the tune of the Adams Family.

( watch it here )

They're tiny and they're teeny,

Much smaller than a beany,

They never can be seeny,

The Atoms Family.

They are so small.

(snap,snap)

They're round like a ball.

(snap,snap)

They make up the air.

They're everywhere.

Can't see them all.

(snap,snap)

Together they make gases,

And liquids like molasses,

And all the solid masses,

The Atoms Family

Neutrons can be found,

Whee protons hang around;

Electrons they surround

The Atoms Family

They are so small.

(snap,snap)

They're round like a ball.

(snap,snap)

They make up the air.

(snap,snap)

They're everywhere.

Can't see them all.

(snap,snap)

And much much more at: chemsongs

PS Father, 2 brothers, 3 nephews/nieces and 2 daughters are chemists.

Nice one DickDioxide ;-)

I just knew there was a chemistry connection connection there somewhere <_<

Link to post
Share on other sites

As madannie has titled this thread "One for the Chemists out there", apart from me and madannie just how many chemists are there who are members of Sheffield History?

Some of the members user names sound as though they have a chemical twist to them, -

Dick Dioxide?

THYLACINE?

nmr 1?

Ok so Dick Dioxide is "one of the chemists out there", anyone else?

It take it that Dicks formal first name will be Richard and that his friends call him Dick.

But to be a dioxide makes Dick an element with a formal oxidation state of +4 (a 4+ cation or a covalency of 4)

Can we track down which element Dick is ?

Does he form any other interesting compounds which will help us narrow it down a bit?

Link to post
Share on other sites

As madannie has titled this thread "One for the Chemists out there", apart from me and madannie just how many chemists are there who are members of Sheffield History?

Some of the members user names sound as though they have a chemical twist to them, -

Dick Dioxide?

THYLACINE?

nmr 1?

OK I know a thylacine is a Tasmanian animal but it sort of sounds chemical doesn't it?

An aromatic 5 membered ring containing Thallium?

Something you buy in the chemists to rub on an itch?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...