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SteveHB

The Farm

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The Farm a large house that once stood in it's own grounds

between Granville Rd and Norfolk Park Rd,

has some very special childhood memories for me.

My aunty Edna worked in the building as an office cleaner in the 50's and 60's,

at the time she was employed by British Rail.

The caretakers of the house,

Mable and Sidney Watson had a son 'David' who was around the same age as myself.

David and I spent many happy hours exploring not only the private grounds,

but also inside the house it's self.

My father also rented an allotment in the grounds,

The Farm was demolished in 1967

and the area was used for extending Granville Rd College (Castle College)

Here's an exellent picture of The Farm, submitted by RichardB

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A selection of maps/cuttings,

on the large scale O/S map #97 The Farm Building is off view, top L/H corner.

The second is 1904,

the third is taken from Stuart0742's 1881 map,

and the last one is from Gramps (thought to be 1920's) map.

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Michael Ellison was the original occupant in 1824

Michael Esq. Ellison Agent to the Duke of Norfolk and Deputy Steward of the Sheffield Court of Requests Corn Exchange; h. the Farm, Park (White's 1833)

Michael Ellison Esq.; Agent to the Duke of Norfolk 20 Corn Exchange; h. The Farm, Park (White's 1849)

Michael Esq. Ellison Agent to the Duke of Norfolk 20 Corn Exchange; h. the Farm, Park (White's 1852)

The Railway connection ...

Arthur S. Jarvis District goods manager The Farm Buildings, Granville Road h. 34 Bannerdale Road ( White's 1911)

No mention in 1919 ?

George G Mallory District goods manager, London, Midland & Scottish Railway Co. The Farm Buildings, Granville Road (Kelly's 1925)

W E Salisbury Agent, Midland Railway Co. Goods Department Wicker Station, Savile Street & Granville Road (White's 1919)

Link to wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheffield_Midland_station

Staff of the London, Midland, Scottish Railway Co. in front the Headquaters, The Farm, Granville Road.

Link to .. picturesheffield s09402

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I believe The Farm was rebuilt in the early 19th. century to provide accommodation for Michael Ellison. The farm certainly appears on Fairbanks map of 1795 so pre-dates Ellison's tenure as DoN's agent.

The Farm as it appears in that 1860 print is as it was rebuilt again to be the Duke of Norfolk's residence in Sheffield. Work commenced in 1857 and Ellison removed to Beech Hill, just up the road.

[RichardB]

Absolutely correct Gramps, Thank you. This from Gatty's Hunter's Hallamshire (the source of the original picture) :

The Farm

The Farm was rebuilt as a residence for the agent of the Duke of Norfolk's property in 1824, and Mr Ellison occupied the house until the accession of Henry Granville, the late Duke, whose desire to reside for a portion of the year in Sheffield, and so have an opportunity of cultivating kindly social intercourse with its inhabitants, led him to make extensive additions to the building, suitable to his own requirements.

The new dining-room claims more than a passing notice. It was constructed after a careful study of an old English interior. The ceiling was executed on the model of the one still remaining at the manour, in the room known as "Queen Mary's room". The heraldic charges, the ornaments of rose, pomegranate, and fleur-de-lis, all attest the period of art which it represents; whilst the wood pannelling of the walls, the mullioned windows, and the noble mantelpiece, with its dog-stove and tile bordering, all belong to that style, which under the comprehensive term "Elizabethan," enters into almost evey home of old England.

A wing was built, containing the offices, which is terminated by a square tower, with oriel turret stair surmounted by a lofty vane, and flanked by a grand stack of chimneys. There is a domestic chapel over the gateway, and the kitchen offices are very capacious and complete.

At the present time (1860's), the tunnel of the Chesterfield line of railway having been constructed thorugh, or rather under the ground attached to the farm, the formation of balustrated terraces has been rendered necessary, as well as a spacious forecourt, which have much improved the exterior appearance.

-----------------------------------------------------

So, Gramps was right about the 1824 rebuild; it would appear from the above that the 1857 work was extensions/improvements.

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Michael Ellison, Agent to the Duke of Norfolk

Additional posts given in brackets.

13 Eyre Street Gell & Bennett 1821

14 Eyre Street Baines's 1822

Offices 13 Eyre Street, and house the Farm Pigot's 1828-9 (and Deputy Steward of the Sheffield Court of Requests)

Corn Exchange; h. the Farm, Park White's 1833 (and Deputy Steward of the Sheffield Court of Requests)

Corn Exchange Pigot's 1841

20 Corn Exchange; h. The Farm, Park White's 1849

Norfolk Cottage, Bellvue Road White's 1849

20 Corn Exchange; h. the Farm, Park White's 1852

Norfolk Cottage, Bellvue Road, Park White's 1852

Beech Hill, Norfolk Park Road Kelly's 1893

Corn Exchange Buildings Kelly's 1893

Bramberwood House, Blackburn Kelly's 1893 (Farmer & Land Steward to the Duke of Norfolk & to the Earl of Effingham)

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Michael Ellison, Agent to the Duke of Norfolk

In business life, Ellison was the land agent to the Duke of Norfolk, who owned large chunks of Sheffield, including Bramall Lane and Ellison actually paid the £70 annually rent for the new ground. He was elected President of Yorkshire in 1866 and held the post until his death in 1898. A remarkably fit man it was claimed that he shot grouse on the first day of the season for 70 consecutive years.

[i've had 15-20 attempts to format this and now I've given up].

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My poor memory :rolleyes: ...Ellison went to live at Beech Hill, not the Beeches which of course was on Barnsley road !!

Tracked it down to a letter from Asline Ward to Hunter 24/12/1857.

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My poor memory :rolleyes: ...Ellison went to live at Beech Hill, not the Beeches which of course was on Barnsley road !!

Tracked it down to a letter from Asline Ward to Hunter 24/12/1857.

Beech Hill, Norfolk Park Road.

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Well done Steve,

A very interesting set of posts to read.

I can only vaguely remember a farm being on this site when I was a kid and I had almost forgotten all about it until I read this thread.

Thanks ;-)

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During the 1950's an annual fair/gala was held in the Farm Grounds as they were known.

Apart from the usual roundabouts and stalls there were attractions like high-wire acts and concerts.

At one such event, which must have been Coronation year or the year after, the show ended with an extensive firework display.

This comprised firework tableau depicting the Queen and Prince, set up at the bottom of the grounds at right angles to Granville Road.

As the fireworks lit up images of the royal couple and messages of congratulations, sparks were seen to spread to the trees lining Granville Road and they quickly caught fire. Everybody had to move away from the flames and we all had to stay on the site until the fire brigade had extinguished it all, escape onto the road being impossible.

A trip to the Farm Grounds was never complete without having a look at the river at the bottom of Queens Road, but it wasn't as exciting as the year the trees caught fire.

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The Farm a large house that once stood in it's own grounds

between Granville Rd and Norfolk Park Rd,

has some very special childhood memories for me.

My aunty Edna worked in the building as an office cleaner in the 50's and 60's,

at the time she was employed by British Rail.

The caretakers of the house,

Mable and Sidney Watson had a son 'David' who was around the same age as myself.

David and I spent many happy hours exploring not only the private grounds,

but also inside the house its self.

My father also rented an allotment in the grounds,

The Farm was demolished in 1967

and the area was used for extending Granville Rd College (Castle College)

Here's an exellent picture of The Farm, submitted by RichardB

Steve,

Here is a nice print of the future Queen Alexandra at the Farm & a bit from Wikipedia which dates the event & explains that the 19th Regiment of Foot became the Princess of Wales Own Regiment.

Princess of Wales's Own

In 1875 Princess Alexandra, Princess of Wales presented new colours to the 1st Battalion at Sheffield, and consented to the regiment bearing her name, thus becoming the 19th (1st Yorkshire North Riding - Princess of Wales's Own) Regiment of Foot. The regiment adopted a cap badge consisting of the Princess's cypher "A" combined with the Dannebrog or Danish cross and topped by her coronet.

The Princess became Queen Alexandra in 1901, and was the regiment's Colonel-in-Chief from 1914 until her death in 1925.

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Hi,

I have just found this site and I would like to say I to have fond memories of the farm.

My mum went to school with Mabel and she also worked as a cleaner in the 1950's and 60's,

her name was Gladys Smith.We lived on St MARY'S Road on the opposite. side From

Edna. We still keep in touch with David and Angela Watson.

I am on the Sheffield History forum as Janet R my email address is Janetraynes@yahoo.co.uk.

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Hi,

I have just found this site and I would like to say I to have fond memories of the farm.

My mum went to school with Mabel and she also worked as a cleaner in the 1950's and 60's,

her name was Gladys Smith.We lived on St MARY'S Road on the opposite. side From

Edna. We still keep in touch with David and Angela Watson.

I am on the Sheffield History forum as Janet R my email address is Janetraynes@yahoo.co.uk.

I'm totally gobsmacked !

Will be in touch, Thanks.

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Hi, Do you have information as to where this photo has come from? I work at The Sheffield College and we're putting information together about the history of the Granville Road site - this photo would be a great addition but we don't want to infringe any copyright. Thanks

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Hi, Do you have information as to where this photo has come from? I work at The Sheffield College and we're putting information together about the history of the Granville Road site - this photo would be a great addition but we don't want to infringe any copyright. Thanks

Stuart0742 should be able to answer your question,

thanks for asking.

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Aunty Edna outside the main doorway of The Farm Buildings.

(year unknown)

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A postcard view of The Farm. It is unused so I am not certain of the date, but as it was printed in Bavaria it is almost certainly pre-WW1.

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A postcard view of The Farm. It is unused so I am not certain of the date, but as it was printed in Bavaria it is almost certainly pre-WW1.

attachicon.gifthe farm.jpg

Thanks MA, that is one of the better artists impressions (looks to have been created from a photo) of the lake in the Farm grounds, it seems strange that there are no known photographs to be found of the lake.

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Around 1820 the Lake was not yet created, but the area was occupied by machinery for stitching together four round ropes to make a flat one for collieries' rail-roads.This was invented, patented and run by John Curr, who lived at Belle-Vue, and who managed the Duke of Norfolks collieries.  He was an improver of steam engines and metal tram-ways and constructed a rail-road across the Park between the pits at Intake and the town.  (information from John Holland's 1859 republication of his poem about the Park)

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This article from the Sheffield & Rotherham Independent details a visit by the Duke of Norfolk to Sheffield in 1851, it also mentions calling at the Farm for lunch.

Duke Of Norfolk.jpg

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Must have been after the 15 September 1851 as that is when Victoria opened to the public. It doesn't mention it as being new either. The "new park" would have been Norfolk Park.

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2 hours ago, History dude said:

Must have been after the 15 September 1851 as that is when Victoria opened to the public. It doesn't mention it as being new either. The "new park" would have been Norfolk Park.

Yes dude, it was published on October 4th, 1851.

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