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Mysterious Numbers


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All the jolly banter aside, here's a scenario which explains why the small marker posts are there and necessary.

A car runs off the road late on a Sunday night. The driver is injured. The young passenger who hasn't a clue which motorway he's on, never mind what direction they were traveling or between which junctions, phones for help. These markers will pin point him to the emergency services to within 100 mt.

People should also be aware that the markers count up and down between emergency telephones. By reading the nearest marker you can tell if you are closer to the one up the carriageway or down it. Thereby saving a possible 900mt walk instead of 100mt.

Bear in mind these were introduced before most people had mobile phones.

I understand the argument vox, but it would appear that most motorists haven't a clue about the meaning of these posts, let alone their passengers. If they're to be any use I think a publicity campaign is inorder.

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Stuart0742

I understand the argument vox, but it would appear that most motorists haven't a clue about the meaning of these posts, let alone their passengers. If they're to be any use I think a publicity campaign is inorder.

In the pre mobile phone era, if you needed help or assistance on the motorway, you had to use the emergency phone, in that case the operator knew where you were. These phones were unreliable, you would often get traffic messages on local radio saying

"The emergency phones are not working on the M1 between junction x & z, incase of breakdown remain with your car as extra police patrols are on the motorway"

Today you would use your mobile, therefore need to know where you are, therefore back to what Bayleaf has just said.

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All the jolly banter aside, here's a scenario which explains why the small marker posts are there and necessary.

A car runs off the road late on a Sunday night. The driver is injured. The young passenger who hasn't a clue which motorway he's on, never mind what direction they were traveling or between which junctions, phones for help. These markers will pin point him to the emergency services to within 100 mt.

People should also be aware that the markers count up and down between emergency telephones. By reading the nearest marker you can tell if you are closer to the one up the carriageway or down it. Thereby saving a possible 900mt walk instead of 100mt.

Bear in mind these were introduced before most people had mobile phones.

Interested in this bit vox,

If you are at a sign which says "M1, B 382.7", how do you know which way to walk to the nearest phone box?

I don't get it?

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We tend to express high temperatures in Degrees Fahrenheit and cold in Centigrade.

When it's hot it's always "up in the 80s", but when it's cold we're more likely to say "it's 2 degrees below freezing" than to say it's 28 degrees.

I thought freezing point in Farenheit was 32 degrees which would make "2 degrees below freezing" 30 degrees and not 28.

28 would be 4 degrees below freezing, - now that is cold :o

But not as cold as that day in January 1982 when it was minus 20 something degrees

The Star reported "Sheffield is colder than the South Pole", not that suprising as January is the southern hemisphere summer!

I remember it because at that time I had to go to work in Derbyshire by motorcycle, about 17 miles away.

It was so cold that it broke the fly zip on my waterproof trousers and I got a very nasty case of frostbite

Took me ages to go to the toilet :blink:

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Stuart0742

Interested in this bit vox,

If you are at a sign which says "M1, B 382.7", how do you know which way to walk to the nearest phone box?

I don't get it?

I think the idea is, the telephones are every 1KM therefore if you are at 382.7 you have 2 choices walk to 383 or back to 382, the nearest phone would be .3KM away at 383

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QUOTE (vox @ Aug 6 2009, 12:35 AM)

We tend to express high temperatures in Degrees Fahrenheit and cold in Centigrade.

When it's hot it's always "up in the 80s", but when it's cold we're more likely to say "it's 2 degrees below freezing" than to say it's 28 degrees.

I thought freezing point in Farenheit was 32 degrees which would make "2 degrees below freezing" 30 degrees and not 28.

28 would be 4 degrees below freezing, - now that is cold :o

You're not taking into account that I was illustrating the fact that we (the general public) tend to refer to warm temperatures in Fahrenheit and cold in Centigrade

This is not solely my observation, but one I heard expressed recently by a TV weatherman, and born out by thinking of the newspaper headlines which proclaim something like.

BIG FREEZE, TEMPERATURES DROP TO MINUS 4.

And when it's hot

BRITAIN BAKES AS TEMPERATURES RISE INTO THE 80's

Quite clearly two different points of reference.

PS. I had done a quick work out in my head to arrive at 28 degrees, but if you want to be pedantic, minus 2 degrees C is 28.4 degrees F

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Interested in this bit vox,

If you are at a sign which says "M1, B 382.7", how do you know which way to walk to the nearest phone box?

I don't get it?

Looks like we're talking about 2 different systems. The posts and the signs.

Seems like they've changed the system since I learned. The posts used to be in miles. It's still basically the same. There's now an arrow on the markers which shows the way to the nearest phone.

I'm off on hols in a couple of days but I must look into it further when I get back.

(I still maintain they're a good thing.)

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QUOTE (vox @ Aug 6 2009, 12:35 AM)

We tend to express high temperatures in Degrees Fahrenheit and cold in Centigrade.

When it's hot it's always "up in the 80s", but when it's cold we're more likely to say "it's 2 degrees below freezing" than to say it's 28 degrees.

I thought freezing point in Farenheit was 32 degrees which would make "2 degrees below freezing" 30 degrees and not 28.

28 would be 4 degrees below freezing, - now that is cold :o

You're not taking into account that I was illustrating the fact that we (the general public) tend to refer to warm temperatures in Fahrenheit and cold in Centigrade

This is not solely my observation, but one I heard expressed recently by a TV weatherman, and born out by thinking of the newspaper headlines which proclaim something like.

BIG FREEZE, TEMPERATURES DROP TO MINUS 4.

And when it's hot

BRITAIN BAKES AS TEMPERATURES RISE INTO THE 80's

Quite clearly two different points of reference.

PS. I had done a quick work out in my head to arrive at 28 degrees, but if you want to be pedantic, minus 2 degrees C is 28.4 degrees F

OK, I get it now,

Its 2 Centigrade degrees below freezing point measured in Fahrenheit (32) would be 28 Fahrenheit (or -2 Centigrade), - what a mix up of units there!

You are right though, we tend to use the biggest numbers possible for the highest temperatures (therefore Fahrenheit), and the smallest numbers possible for the lowest temperatures (therefore Centigrade, which would frequently be negative numbers)

So that just leaves 2 things now that I don't get.

1}

How can you tell from a motorway distance marker which way to walk to the nearest emergency phone box?

2}

Just exactly what are those mysterious 6 digit code numbers that have appeared on our street signs?

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Stuart0742

OK, I get it now,

Its 2 Centigrade degrees below freezing point measured in Fahrenheit (32) would be 28 Fahrenheit (or -2 Centigrade), - what a mix up of units there!

You are right though, we tend to use the biggest numbers possible for the highest temperatures (therefore Fahrenheit), and the smallest numbers possible for the lowest temperatures (therefore Centigrade, which would frequently be negative numbers)

So that just leaves 2 things now that I don't get.

1}

How can you tell from a motorway distance marker which way to walk to the nearest emergency phone box?

2}

Just exactly what are those mysterious 6 digit code numbers that have appeared on our street signs?

I am sure at one time the signs told you, perhaps nowadays they just expect you to sit there and await help, given the numbers of alternatives

Mobile phone, cctv, passing police car and lets not forget the new "Highway Agency Patrols" in their pretend police cars. <_<

Think given the wide subject of this topic and it looks like continuing it may be better suited to "General Chat" :)

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Looks like we're talking about 2 different systems. The posts and the signs.

Seems like they've changed the system since I learned. The posts used to be in miles. It's still basically the same. There's now an arrow on the markers which shows the way to the nearest phone.

I'm off on hols in a couple of days but I must look into it further when I get back.

(I still maintain they're a good thing.)

Sorry vox, I was typing my reply (next post on) to your previous post while you were posting this one so I missed it.

I understand from your posts how these posts work and how they give the information you stated, but, as you say, they are not the signs I was referring to.

They're not the easiest or safest things to photograph while you are driving down a motorway but it probably does merit further investigation.

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Stuart0742

Looks like we're talking about 2 different systems. The posts and the signs.

Seems like they've changed the system since I learned. The posts used to be in miles. It's still basically the same. There's now an arrow on the markers which shows the way to the nearest phone.

I'm off on hols in a couple of days but I must look into it further when I get back.

(I still maintain they're a good thing.)

They are the ones I remember, they pointed which way to walk

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Right

I'm getting to the bottom of it now.

1/ Emergency telephones are appx. 1 mile apart. (Maybe on new motorways they could be 1km apart I don't know)

2/ The original markers which indicated where you were in relation to a phone were 1/10th of a mile apart, and were sub-numbered between phones so you could tell if you were closer to the next one or the previous one.

QUOTE (Bayleaf @ Aug 6 2009, 10:29 AM) I understand the argument vox, but it would appear that most motorists haven't a clue about the meaning of these posts, let alone their passengers. If they're to be any use I think a publicity campaign is inorder.

---

Perfectly true bayleaf but "them as makes the rules" will tell you that all motorists should keep themselves up to date with the latest edition of the Highway Code. I suppose it also reminds us that giving our passengers a bit of emergency proceedure information would not be a bad thing either. I for one am guilty of still thinking of road use as it was 40years ago when I first learned. (It's never been the same since the AA men stopped saluting) :)

With regard to the original question about street sign numbers I still think I'm on the right track with grid references. They're not OS because Ridgehill Ave would be in Matlock if they were, but there are other systems which relate to Sat Nav etc.

I'm awaiting a reply from the Highways department. I phoned and mailed a couple of days ago and no one could tell me. :angry: They're looking into it. (I'm not holding my breath). Hopefully I'll have a reply by the time I'm back from hols. in a week or so.

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Right

I'm getting to the bottom of it now.

1/ Emergency telephones are appx. 1 mile apart. (Maybe on new motorways they could be 1km apart I don't know)

2/ The original markers which indicated where you were in relation to a phone were 1/10th of a mile apart, and were sub-numbered between phones so you could tell if you were closer to the next one or the previous one.

QUOTE (Bayleaf @ Aug 6 2009, 10:29 AM) I understand the argument vox, but it would appear that most motorists haven't a clue about the meaning of these posts, let alone their passengers. If they're to be any use I think a publicity campaign is inorder.

---

Perfectly true bayleaf but "them as makes the rules" will tell you that all motorists should keep themselves up to date with the latest edition of the Highway Code. I suppose it also reminds us that giving our passengers a bit of emergency proceedure information would not be a bad thing either. I for one am guilty of still thinking of road use as it was 40years ago when I first learned. (It's never been the same since the AA men stopped saluting) :)

With regard to the original question about street sign numbers I still think I'm on the right track with grid references. They're not OS because Ridgehill Ave would be in Matlock if they were, but there are other systems which relate to Sat Nav etc.

I'm awaiting a reply from the Highways department. I phoned and mailed a couple of days ago and no one could tell me. :angry: They're looking into it. (I'm not holding my breath). Hopefully I'll have a reply by the time I'm back from hols. in a week or so.

Thanks for sorting out the motorway sign issue vox, and for the enquiries made so far about the numbers on local street signs, - they are the real mystery which prompted this topic in the first place and I would love to know what they mean, what they are for and why they are there.

I am sure we will find out eventually.

Enjoy your holiday, I'll be off on mine in just over a week and unlike Stuart0742 who took his computer to France with him i will be taking a well earned break from posting on SH at the same time.

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Thanks for sorting out the motorway sign issue vox, and for the enquiries made so far about the numbers on local street signs, - they are the real mystery which prompted this topic in the first place and I would love to know what they mean, what they are for and why they are there.

I am sure we will find out eventually.

Enjoy your holiday, I'll be off on mine in just over a week and unlike Stuart0742 who took his computer to France with him i will be taking a well earned break from posting on SH at the same time.

Thanks Dave

I've just had a phonecall from Highways.

Here's the answer -

Oh - I think I'll tell you when I get back from Hols. :o

Joke!!

Hands firmly held up in the air I have to say I was wrong.

They are a unique identification code for the signs. If quoted, the Council can identify it and it's location should it require maintenance, alteration etc. There is a Master Plan which will eventually list all signs and their exact locations along with other information.

If for instance there was need to change the details on one "No Waiting" sign on a given street, but not on an adjacent sign, the maintenance men are less likely to do the wrong sign by mistake.

He did mention the number of signs that they are responsible for. I cant remember the number but it was gigantinormassivulous.

So - marks go to those who said anything like "identification numbers".

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Stuart0742

Thanks for sorting out the motorway sign issue vox, and for the enquiries made so far about the numbers on local street signs, - they are the real mystery which prompted this topic in the first place and I would love to know what they mean, what they are for and why they are there.

I am sure we will find out eventually.

Enjoy your holiday, I'll be off on mine in just over a week and unlike Stuart0742 who took his computer to France with him i will be taking a well earned break from posting on SH at the same time.

The pitfalls of taking a laptop abroad

Switzerland, where no wifi is available Tmobile charge you £7.50 mbit (3G) so thats a non starter

EU its £1.50 mbit on 3G

The camp we stopped at in France had wifi 3 Euro's an hour but it only worked 50% of the time.

So on the whole it is a waste of time, you have the right idea just forget it and relax :)

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Thanks Dave

I've just had a phonecall from Highways.

Here's the answer -

Oh - I think I'll tell you when I get back from Hols. :o

Joke!!

Hands firmly held up in the air I have to say I was wrong.

They are a unique identification code for the signs. If quoted, the Council can identify it and it's location should it require maintenance, alteration etc. There is a Master Plan which will eventually list all signs and their exact locations along with other information.

If for instance there was need to change the details on one "No Waiting" sign on a given street, but not on an adjacent sign, the maintenance men are less likely to do the wrong sign by mistake.

He did mention the number of signs that they are responsible for. I cant remember the number but it was gigantinormassivulous.

So - marks go to those who said anything like "identification numbers".

Thanks Vox, glad you got it sorted before your holiday! lol

Hope you have a good time!

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These numbers seem to be cropping up on all council roadside stuff, I just thought they were serial numbers, if you put numbers on stuff you can employ somebody to go round and count them make sure they are not being nicked.

Looks like Stuart had it right in post #3.

Thanks to vox for his research work on this, - I feel I've learnt something from starting this thread as I had no idea what those numbers were all about.

I take it the current number of signs is somewhere around the 310,000 mark, although the system has scope for up to 999,999

I suppose that brings this thread to a close so now vox and myself can both get ready for a holiday

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The pitfalls of taking a laptop abroad

Switzerland, where no wifi is available Tmobile charge you £7.50 mbit (3G) so thats a non starter

EU its £1.50 mbit on 3G

The camp we stopped at in France had wifi 3 Euro's an hour but it only worked 50% of the time.

So on the whole it is a waste of time, you have the right idea just forget it and relax :)

You forgot to add your warning about using the Internet abroad at these prices Stuart.

Turn off any automatic update in any program that uses them

Those updates could end up costing yopu a fortune :o :o

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OK, to keep this jovial thread going, and to celebrate just passing my 2000th post, heres a new challenge, its called :-

MINES BIGGER THAN YOURS

{that sounds rude, but it isn't}

The challenge is, who can find the largest street identification number in Sheffield?

So far the largest number quoted in this thread is

RIDGEHILL AVENUE, 309584

Can anyone beat that?

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OK, to keep this jovial thread going, and to celebrate just passing my 2000th post, heres a new challenge, its called :-

MINES BIGGER THAN YOURS

{that sounds rude, but it isn't}

The challenge is, who can find the largest street identification number in Sheffield?

So far the largest number quoted in this thread is

RIDGEHILL AVENUE, 309584

Can anyone beat that?

NEW HIGH SCORE

Newlands Road, S12, 316397

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