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Victorian Spring Races

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Apparently handicap sprint races were very popular in Sheffield in the late Victorian era.

Just wondered if anyone had heard or knew anything about them?

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Apparently handicap sprint races were very popular in Sheffield in the late Victorian era.

Just wondered if anyone had heard or knew anything about them?

Some information mentioned here; see also Arthur Wharton in Sports section.

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/epitaph...ot-1253601.html

In the closeted world of Victorian sport, Darlington's emerging champion came to be known, even in print, as "Darkie" Wharton. It was for much more than the colour of his skin, however, that Wharton stood out from his peers. His speed earned him a second AAA 100 yards title in 1887 and a professional sprinting career which yielded a famous victory in the prestigious Sheffield Handicap and another even time clocking - 12.6 sec for 126 yards - in the New Year Sprint at Powderhall, Edinburgh. He gained equal renown as a footballer, though as one of exceptional agility rather than pace.

Perhaps only a club with Darlington's capacity for underachievement on a grand scale could have chosen to utilise the world's fastest man as a goalkeeper. But Wharton became a pioneer in the custodian's eccentric art; he was known to swing on the crossbar and catch the ball between his legs. He appeared in an FA Cup semi-final for Preston North End in 1887 and played for Sheffield United in the First Division. He was also a professional cricketer in South Yorkshire and won the the Blackburn to Preston cycle race in record time.

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Teviotdale Record and Jedburgh Advertiser Saturday 13th August 1856

http://www.jedburgh-border-games.com/1853.htm

The Grand Steeplechase to the top of the Dunion and back, a distance of nearly two miles was anxiously looked forward to. It was generally known that the celebrated runners John Levett of Sheffield, Thomas Kerr of Edinburgh and Charles Scott of Singmoor, last years winner were among the competitors.

Levett took the lead followed closely by Sword, Robson, Kerr and Scott taking it quite coolly a few yards behind. The runners were soon lost sight of by a cloud covering the top of the hill. One by one the runners emerged from the mist, and came slapping and dashing down the brow of the hill. Scott, out in front, was easily was easily distinguished from the others as he had donned the fancy dress given by a gentleman of Jedburgh which he had worn during the early part of the day.

Levett, the Sheffield man could have picked up this prize, but, although a crack man at long distance on level ground, and said to be the best runner in England, he was unaccustomed to the hill running experience. Charles Scott is a Jedwater lad, a shepherd presently residing at Singmoor, near Alwinton.

The Band played from the Moor, and on their arrival at the Nag's Head, played the National Anthem. The town was very quiet during the evening of the Games, and not a single breach of peace occurred.

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"unaccustomed to the hill running experience" !!!!!

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Teviotdale Record and Jedburgh Advertiser Saturday 13th August 1856

http://www.jedburgh-border-games.com/1853.htm

The Grand Steeplechase to the top of the Dunion and back, a distance of nearly two miles was anxiously looked forward to. It was generally known that the celebrated runners John Levett of Sheffield, Thomas Kerr of Edinburgh and Charles Scott of Singmoor, last years winner were among the competitors.

Levett took the lead followed closely by Sword, Robson, Kerr and Scott taking it quite coolly a few yards behind. The runners were soon lost sight of by a cloud covering the top of the hill. One by one the runners emerged from the mist, and came slapping and dashing down the brow of the hill. Scott, out in front, was easily was easily distinguished from the others as he had donned the fancy dress given by a gentleman of Jedburgh which he had worn during the early part of the day.

Levett, the Sheffield man could have picked up this prize, but, although a crack man at long distance on level ground, and said to be the best runner in England, he was unaccustomed to the hill running experience. Charles Scott is a Jedwater lad, a shepherd presently residing at Singmoor, near Alwinton.

The Band played from the Moor, and on their arrival at the Nag's Head, played the National Anthem. The town was very quiet during the evening of the Games, and not a single breach of peace occurred.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"unaccustomed to the hill running experience" !!!!!

John Levett, my gg grandfather's brother was actually born in Battersea and known as the Battersea Pet but his running took him to Sheffield. Probably not many hills in Battersea! He won the Champion's Belt twice.

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John Levett, my gg grandfather's brother was actually born in Battersea and known as the Battersea Pet but his running took him to Sheffield. Probably not many hills in Battersea! He won the Champion's Belt twice.

Great to hear from a relative, anyone else related to a Sheffield name ?

We have some historical information on here somewhere relating to your name,, hopefully a Link Fairie can find my tale of my Grandfathers time when he had good reason to have gone Doolally (and the picture of the bridge).

The boat will be here soon.

Yeah, right

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