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I originally went onto this site looking for the map of bombs that had dropped in the vicinity of Meersbrook.

I have recently found these photo,s of the top of Lismore Road. A photo from last year for comparison.

Must have been an affluent area. Dont the ladies look smart.

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Hi All

Not sure how this post works as I have only just joined the site.

The photos are of 42, Lismore Road which at that time was called Ash Villas (the road may have been called Livingstone Road at the time of the blitz with Stanley Road running parallel as it does) This is where my Mum (family name Wilkinson) was born in 1922 and from where she and her and Mum and Dad were bombed out of during the first night of the Sheffield blitz. The house was hit at about 23:00 hrs that night. Her Dad (my maternal Grandad) had converted the coal cellar in to a shelter by reinforcing the roof with railway sleepers. The vertical sleepers were apparently forced 10 inches into the floor as the weigt of the house collapsed on the cellar. All three of them escaped out of the cellar, from a direct hit, "...without a scratch..." - absolutely incredible.....although they were initially reported as killed at the Carfield School centre the following day.

They spent the rest of the Blitz night sharing a shelter on Carfield Place. From there the next morning they walked through a devastated Sheffield city centre to try to catch a bus to Halifax where my Great Grand Parents lived. They got a lift on the back of a waggon to Barnsley and got a bus from there to Halifax. My Great Grand parents knew the photographer on the Halifax Courier and he came across to Sheff and took the pictures about two weeks after the blitz (hence the posh coats on my Great Grandma)

I recently "interviewed" my Mum about the detail of that "Blitz night" and somewhere have written down some incredible memories which I could post to this site to accompany the photos if anyone thinks they are useful or this is the correct place for them to go.

Just before I forget, my Mum distinctly remembers that they were hit by the third in a "stick" of bombs. The first fell on the Meersbrook Allotments, the second hit and destroyed a house on the bend of Carfield Avenue (down to Piggy Jack Lane) and she thinks killed all the occupants in that house. At that explosion, which apparently blew out the cast iron lid to the coal shute in 42 Lis) my Grandad apparently said "Blimey that was close....." and the next instant their house was hit. The wooden ridge beam to 42 Lis was apparently found in Upper Albert Road.

Anyway, that is how the 'photos came to be and a bit of history behind them. One of them features in the "Heeley then and Now" series of books although I can't remember which one.

Please reply to email if this is of interest.

Best regards

Dave

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Lismore Rd. was named as such on my 1920's map

Hi All

Not sure how this post works as I have only just joined the site.

The photos are of 42, Lismore Road which at that time was called Ash Villas (the road may have been called Livingstone Road at the time of the blitz with Stanley Road running parallel as it does) This is where my Mum (family name Wilkinson) was born in 1922 and from where she and her and Mum and Dad were bombed out of during the first night of the Sheffield blitz. The house was hit at about 23:00 hrs that night. Her Dad (my maternal Grandad) had converted the coal cellar in to a shelter by reinforcing the roof with railway sleepers. The vertical sleepers were apparently forced 10 inches into the floor as the weigt of the house collapsed on the cellar. All three of them escaped out of the cellar, from a direct hit, "...without a scratch..." - absolutely incredible.....although they were initially reported as killed at the Carfield School centre the following day.

They spent the rest of the Blitz night sharing a shelter on Carfield Place. From there the next morning they walked through a devastated Sheffield city centre to try to catch a bus to Halifax where my Great Grand Parents lived. They got a lift on the back of a waggon to Barnsley and got a bus from there to Halifax. My Great Grand parents knew the photographer on the Halifax Courier and he came across to Sheff and took the pictures about two weeks after the blitz (hence the posh coats on my Great Grandma)

I recently "interviewed" my Mum about the detail of that "Blitz night" and somewhere have written down some incredible memories which I could post to this site to accompany the photos if anyone thinks they are useful or this is the correct place for them to go.

Just before I forget, my Mum distinctly remembers that they were hit by the third in a "stick" of bombs. The first fell on the Meersbrook Allotments, the second hit and destroyed a house on the bend of Carfield Avenue (down to Piggy Jack Lane) and she thinks killed all the occupants in that house. At that explosion, which apparently blew out the cast iron lid to the coal shute in 42 Lis) my Grandad apparently said "Blimey that was close....." and the next instant their house was hit. The wooden ridge beam to 42 Lis was apparently found in Upper Albert Road.

Anyway, that is how the 'photos came to be and a bit of history behind them. One of them features in the "Heeley then and Now" series of books although I can't remember which one.

Please reply to email if this is of interest.

Best regards

Dave

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I recently "interviewed" my Mum about the detail of that "Blitz night" and somewhere have written down some incredible memories which I could post to this site to accompany the photos if anyone thinks they are useful or this is the correct place for them to go.

Dave

Hi Dave,

thank you for posting such a detailed discription of that night on Lismore Road.

And of course you can post your Mom's recollections on here,

I'm sure our members will be looking forward to reading them.

Welcome to Sheffieldhistory.

Steve

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Hi All

Not sure how this post works as I have only just joined the site.

The photos are of 42, Lismore Road which at that time was called Ash Villas (the road may have been called Livingstone Road at the time of the blitz with Stanley Road running parallel as it does) This is where my Mum (family name Wilkinson) was born in 1922 and from where she and her and Mum and Dad were bombed out of during the first night of the Sheffield blitz. The house was hit at about 23:00 hrs that night. Her Dad (my maternal Grandad) had converted the coal cellar in to a shelter by reinforcing the roof with railway sleepers. The vertical sleepers were apparently forced 10 inches into the floor as the weigt of the house collapsed on the cellar. All three of them escaped out of the cellar, from a direct hit, "...without a scratch..." - absolutely incredible.....although they were initially reported as killed at the Carfield School centre the following day.

They spent the rest of the Blitz night sharing a shelter on Carfield Place. From there the next morning they walked through a devastated Sheffield city centre to try to catch a bus to Halifax where my Great Grand Parents lived. They got a lift on the back of a waggon to Barnsley and got a bus from there to Halifax. My Great Grand parents knew the photographer on the Halifax Courier and he came across to Sheff and took the pictures about two weeks after the blitz (hence the posh coats on my Great Grandma)

I recently "interviewed" my Mum about the detail of that "Blitz night" and somewhere have written down some incredible memories which I could post to this site to accompany the photos if anyone thinks they are useful or this is the correct place for them to go.

Just before I forget, my Mum distinctly remembers that they were hit by the third in a "stick" of bombs. The first fell on the Meersbrook Allotments, the second hit and destroyed a house on the bend of Carfield Avenue (down to Piggy Jack Lane) and she thinks killed all the occupants in that house. At that explosion, which apparently blew out the cast iron lid to the coal shute in 42 Lis) my Grandad apparently said "Blimey that was close....." and the next instant their house was hit. The wooden ridge beam to 42 Lis was apparently found in Upper Albert Road.

Anyway, that is how the 'photos came to be and a bit of history behind them. One of them features in the "Heeley then and Now" series of books although I can't remember which one.

Please reply to email if this is of interest.

Best regards

Dave

Hi Dave and welcome, I am sure we will all enjoy reading any memories you would like to post.

Enjoy the site. :)

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