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Sheffield History

Sweets and Chocolate bars of the past !

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It was called Carter Bond.

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Can't find any Jap Desserts, but I have just scoffed my way through a bag of Coconut Mushrooms.

Well, I ate the mushrooms and my dog ate the stalks.

Mmmmm, we both enjoyed them.

I love coconut mushrooms and even more so jab desserts.

I bought some jab desserts two years ago, you usually find them in the tourist sweet shops

at York, Beamish, Critch , Windsor etc

I also bought pineapple cubes, tiger nuts and lquorice wood. the liquorice wood was very dry though

not as I remembered it, maybe it was old. I told hubby to use it for plugging holes in the wall he he

Can anyone remember the coloured blown sweetened rice? I bought some of that too, plus some

sherbert flying saucers . My all time favourite was acid drops , shaped like a spangle and lemon in colour

but oh so sharp and tangy. The ones I bought that day were a lot sweeter.

I was like a kid in a sweet shop.

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I was like a kid in a sweet shop.

I would have been like a kid in a sweet shop when I was a kid.

But a sugar shortage in the mid 1970's made me live without it for a while and I never went back to it, I now don;t like overly sweet, sugary food anymore.

Which is just as well as Type II diabetes means it would not be sensible for my own health and wellbeing to eat such treats anymore

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I know its probably slightly off topic, but does anyone remember the crisps that had the football card in the packet with them? Around about 1977/78. I remember collecting the whole world cup Scotland team, only saw them in the school tuck shop.

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I know its probably slightly off topic, but does anyone remember the crisps that had the football card in the packet with them? Around about 1977/78. I remember collecting the whole world cup Scotland team, only saw them in the school tuck shop.

The 1978 World Cup took place in Argentina.

Scotland was the only British team to have qualified and be playing in the competition.

Unfortunately, the Scotland team were accused of taking drugs and cheating after a dope test which brought the team into disrepute.

Willie Johnstone had apparently taken hayfever tablets for his hayfever (I can sympathise with him on this as I know what it's like to suffer from it) and this had caused him to fail the test. He was sent home in disgrace and never played for his country again.

Unfortunately early Hayfever medications did contain ephidrine or steroids which are banned substances and to be honest, was not that effective against the hayfever. Rather than enhance your performance in competitive sport it was more likely to make you feel very tired and fall asleep, hence the 2do not drive or operate machine if affected by these tablets" on the instructions.

The current hayfever tablets contain Citerizine, a very different and much more efffective drug against hayfever without the side effects, - and it is not banned in sporting contests.

Seems very much a sad miscarriage of justice against the Scottish team. :(

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Does anyone remember these 80s sweets/snacks?

Piglets - puffy pig shaped crisps - all the usual flavours.

So glad someone remembers piglets!!. Everyone thinks i am cracking up he he

they were 3 dimensional, not flat like todays pom-bears

obviously, bacon flavour was the best lol

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I remember Nibbets , I loved them.

The little teddy bears what they sell today are about the nearest I can find

taste wise to Nibbets.

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I remember buying piglets and hedgehog crisps for my kids. The hedgehog crisps were on sale at Holland and Barrett of all places! I have to go with UKL and Nibbets as my personal all-time favourites though! I've never come across anything quite the same.

We used to visit my gran most Saturdays when I was a kid. She lived on Clarence Street, and after tea I'd go along with her, jug in hand, to the local off-licence. It was only tiny, but I remember the polished wooden counter, which I could barely see over, and a row of hand pumps with decorated ceramic handles. And it was there I was introduced to Nibbets.

Can anyone help with this one. Tiny pieces of concentrated liquorice, came in a little square tin, called something like Imps? Possibly sold as a laxative rather than sweets, they were so strong!

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I remember Nibbets , I loved them.

The little teddy bears what they sell today are about the nearest I can find

taste wise to Nibbets.

I discovered the teddy bears Pom Bears and bought them for my grandson but ended up having to buy some for me after finding out that they were like Nibits. mmmmmmjust melt in your mouth and back to childhood :rolleyes:

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Can anyone help with this one. Tiny pieces of concentrated liquorice, came in a little square tin, called something like Imps? Possibly sold as a laxative rather than sweets, they were so strong!

Liquorice has well known laxative properties and it was used in some laxative tablets, although it has now been largely replaced in favour of senna pod preparations.

Some of the older laxatives like Ex-Lax used to contain liquorice extract and syrup of figs and were quite potent, although they were usually just referred to as "shitters". :unsure:

Are you sure these were actually sweets and not just a tin of laxatives? :o

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Liquorice has well known laxative properties and it was used in some laxative tablets, although it has now been largely replaced in favour of senna pod preparations.

Some of the older laxatives like Ex-Lax used to contain liquorice extract and syrup of figs and were quite potent, although they were usually just referred to as "shitters". :unsure:

Are you sure these were actually sweets and not just a tin of laxatives? :o

I remember buying Little Imps, loved em. I think you can still get them at specialist sweet shops.

No they're not a laxative, never did anything for me. :wacko:

Years ago the chemist at the top of Weston Street used to sell the black hard liquorice in big chunks.

He would break it with a small hammer like they did the toffee and it would fall apart into what looked like pieces of shiny coal.

It was very strong though.

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I remember buying Little Imps, loved em. I think you can still get them at specialist sweet shops.

No they're not a laxative, never did anything for me. :wacko:

Years ago the chemist at the top of Weston Street used to sell the black hard liquorice in big chunks.

He would break it with a small hammer like they did the toffee and it would fall apart into what looked

like pieces of shiney coal.

It was very strong though.

Well,

As Bertie Bassett will tell you

Liquorice comes in allsorts

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Liquorice has well known laxative properties and it was used in some laxative tablets, although it has now been largely replaced in favour of senna pod preparations.

Some of the older laxatives like Ex-Lax used to contain liquorice extract and syrup of figs and were quite potent, although they were usually just referred to as "shitters". :unsure:

Are you sure these were actually sweets and not just a tin of laxatives? :o

There's a scene in a Goon Show between Eccles and Bluebottle. Eccles needs a stick of dynamite and askes Bluebottle if he's got one. "No" says Bluebottle "but I've got a stick of likorish"." I need an explosive" says Eccles." Likorish is an explosive" says Bluebottle.

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What about the large biscuits called Dundee"s . I remember having them at breaktime at school . They were like a large digestive biscuit with chocolate on one side and DUNDEE printed on the other. They were around 4" round and 1/2 " thick and seemed huge as a akid. I think most schools sold them at lunchbreaks , but you couldnt buy them in shops.

...they were a foot wide!!...as I recall

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While hunting out a cultural clip for HD, I came across this.

A lot of those 1970's chocolate wrappers have either a printed price or a price ticket on them.

A bar of chocolate for less than a shilling!!! :blink:

Oh well, such are the effects of inflation I suppose :(

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I remember buying piglets and hedgehog crisps for my kids. The hedgehog crisps were on sale at Holland and Barrett of all places! I have to go with UKL and Nibbets as my personal all-time favourites though! I've never come across anything quite the same.

We used to visit my gran most Saturdays when I was a kid. She lived on Clarence Street, and after tea I'd go along with her, jug in hand, to the local off-licence. It was only tiny, but I remember the polished wooden counter, which I could barely see over, and a row of hand pumps with decorated ceramic handles. And it was there I was introduced to Nibbets.

Can anyone help with this one. Tiny pieces of concentrated liquorice, came in a little square tin, called something like Imps? Possibly sold as a laxative rather than sweets, they were so strong!

I posted this a few days ago, then at the weekend I heard someone talking and realised she never called it the off-licence, it was always 'the dram shop'!

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I posted this a few days ago, then at the weekend I heard someone talking and realised she never called it the off-licence, it was always 'the dram shop'!

Is "dram shop" a Scottish expression for an off licence?

Off licences sell alcoholic drinks away from a main public bar more like a shop would.

So in Scotland would a dram shop sell "a wee dram" meaning a single measure of spirit such as Scotch whiskey

A dram is an old unit of mass and also of liquid volume related to fluid ounces. In the context of alcoholic spirits a dram is 30ml which would be about the right volume for whiskey measures.

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I know this is nothing to do with sweets but what ever happened to blood oranges ?

All we seem to see today are satsumas which are full of pips even

the pipless ones get plenty in them and most of them are so dry.

Blood oranges were so juicy with a taste of their own.

Why were they red in parts was this "man made? "

Awaiting Daves response. :) ;-)

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Remember Dundee biscuitswell, I'd give a fiver for one right now !

...they were a foot wide!!...as I recall

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I know this is nothing to do with sweets but what ever happened to blood oranges ?

All we seem to see today are satsumas which are full of pips even

the pipless ones get plenty in them and most of them are so dry.

Blood oranges were so juicy with a taste of their own.

Why were they red in parts was this "man made? "

Awaiting Daves response. :);-)

Blood oranges are a variety of orange, native to Italy, with a blood red centre rather than the normal orange colour of oranges.

The red segments are caused by a pigment which is common in red coloured plants but not that common in the centre of citrus fruits, hence the unusual colouring of this particular variety of orange.

The same red pigment may also be responsible for their distinctive taste and flavour.

You need to get small imature satsumas to avoid the pips, they quickly develop above a certain size.

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Blood oranges are a variety of orange, native to Italy, with a blood red centre rather than the normal orange colour of oranges.

The red segments are caused by a pigment which is common in red coloured plants but not that common in the centre of citrus fruits, hence the unusual colouring of this particular variety of orange.

Thank you Dave. I wonder why they don't sell them here anymore?

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Thank you Dave. I wonder why they don't sell them here anymore?

No idea on that one, and to be honest I haven't seen or eaten one for years now that you mention it.

However, with all fruit and vegetable crops, new varieties and hybrids often replace older ones and things do change.

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