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Stuart0742

Telephone Box Challenge

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It's a gud un. ;-)

I would like to nominate it, in a web poll, as a picture for the 2011 Sheffield History Fake Then & Now Calendar

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Top of Wood Fall Lane, High Bradfield.

<iframe width="425" height="350" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" src="http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;ll=53.428314,-1.597604&amp;spn=0,359.998308&amp;z=19&amp;layer=c&amp;cbll=53.428314,-1.597604&amp;panoid=w4NzyVk_c9kVWrEq3ehPGg&amp;cbp=12,93.39,,0,17.55&amp;source=embed&amp;output=svembed"></iframe><br /><small><a href="http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;ll=53.428314,-1.597604&amp;spn=0,359.998308&amp;z=19&amp;layer=c&amp;cbll=53.428314,-1.597604&amp;panoid=w4NzyVk_c9kVWrEq3ehPGg&amp;cbp=12,93.39,,0,17.55&amp;source=embed" style="color:#0000FF;text-align:left">View Larger Map</a></small>

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Thought this topic needed another airing

Winter St by the entrance to St Georges Hospital

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Cast iron then.

Don't hit one of them too hard with a sledge hammer, - it will crack into pieces.

When we had our new bathroom fitted the old bath was made of cast iron, not glassfibre or plastic like the modern ones.

The fitter said it would be too heavy for him to safely carry down the stairs to get it out of the house so he would smash it up with a sledge hammer first.

Amazing how easily such an apparently solid, heavy metallic object could be smashed to pieces.

He put the smashed up bits of bath in the waste skip on the end of our drive but within an hour some local scrap men had been and helped themselves to the scrap iron bath. :o

There's cast iron and cast iron. Some cast iron can be very mallable. When I tried to smash a 1939 vintage cast iron bath in order to remove it, the side of the bath just bent in until it was touching the other side. It wasn't a steel bath, it was made from cast iron about a centimeter thick. To make it break I had to weaken it by drilling rows of holes and it drilled out as fine dust 'so I know it was iron.

The most I could do was to break it into 3 pieces which I could just manage to get down the stairs.

HD

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There's cast iron and cast iron. Some cast iron can be very mallable. When I tried to smash a 1939 vintage cast iron bath in order to remove it, the side of the bath just bent in until it was touching the other side. It wasn't a steel bath, it was made from cast iron about a centimeter thick. To make it break I had to weaken it by drilling rows of holes and it drilled out as fine dust 'so I know it was iron.

The most I could do was to break it into 3 pieces which I could just manage to get down the stairs.

HD

Cast Iron is notoriously brittle.

Being made in a blast furnace full of coke (carbon) it contains as an impurity typically about 4% carbon which makes it brittle.

Removing all the impurities to get almost pure iron results in a very different type of iron, Wrought Iron which is extremely malleable and can be bent, without breaking, with ease.

As both of these are produced by initial furnace casting and then "burning out" the impurities it can give inconsistent results and yes you can get cast iron which behaves like hilldwellers bath.

When we had our bathroom done last year the workman smashed the old cast iron bath up as it was too heavy to carry downstairs safely. He belted it with a sledgehammer several times causing no more damage than a few dents (malleable) but on the ninth or tenth belt the whole bath seemed to explode and shattered into fairly small pieces (brittle).

I assume this behaviour is due to a non uniform distribution of carbon within the iron.

Cast iron, 4% carbon, hard but brittle

Wrought iron 0.1% carbon soft but malleable

It was soon realised that somewhere between these 2 extremes at around the 0.5 to 1.8% carbon mark iron would take on the intermediate more desirable properties of both, becoming both hard and strong without being brittle.

Iron deliberately made to contain a uniform but accurately measured low % of carbon in the range 0.5 - 1.5%, that's the stuff to use.

We call this alloy mixture steel and here in Sheffield we seem to have been pretty good at doing that ;-) lol

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Cast iron, 4% carbon, hard but brittle

Wrought iron 0.1% carbon soft but malleable

It was soon realised that somewhere between these 2 extremes at around the 0.5 to 1.8% carbon mark iron would take on the intermediate more desirable properties of both, becoming both hard and strong without being brittle.

Iron deliberately made to contain a uniform but accurately measured low % of carbon in the range 0.5 - 1.5%, that's the stuff to use.

We call this alloy mixture steel and here in Sheffield we seem to have been pretty good at doing that ;-)lol

Which results in an (at first glance) slightly misleading description of it as high carbon steel when it is nearing that 1% mark. Until you know that anything over (I think the figure is) 2%, is technically cast iron.

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Could that be an echo from MA's post Stuart ..

;-)

Could that be an echo from MA's post Stuart -.tuart - uart - art - rt - t

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Could that be an echo from MA's post Stuart -.tuart - uart - art - rt - t

I did check, honest

I thought it strange nobody had posted this one, ahh well, "worse things happen at sea" as my dad used to say

A lot on my mind this week

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Which results in an (at first glance) slightly misleading description of it as high carbon steel when it is nearing that 1% mark. Until you know that anything over (I think the figure is) 2%, is technically cast iron.

Yes I would agree with that, over 2% is brittle enough to be cast iron.

A "high Carbon" steel actually contains only about 1-2% or so of carbon, not massive amounts of it.

Amazing what a difference a little bit of carbon can make.

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Halifax road/Salt Box Lane.

Langsett road Oughtibridge.

These two have now gone, disappeared in the night. :o :blink:

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The telephone box at Green Moor has been bought by Hunshelf Parish Council

for £1. . .how much?

Having lost just about everything else in their small community eg: the school,

shop and pub [ The Rock ] the old telephone box will serve as a lending library.

It will be used by locals and walkers alike.

A bit different I must admit, I wanted one for a garden shed.

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This ones on Ecclesall Road South, does the other one count?

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The telephone box at Green Moor has been bought by Hunshelf Parish Council

for £1. . .how much?

Having lost just about everything else in their small community eg: the school,

shop and pub [ The Rock ] the old telephone box will serve as a lending library.

It will be used by locals and walkers alike.

A bit different I must admit, I wanted one for a garden shed.

I used to work with a chap that lived right on the top of the hill at Green Moor.

His wife worked evenings in Sheffield with variable finishing times.

In the days before mobile phones she used to keep a small radio control transmitter as used by modellers in her bag.

When she got off the bus down in Stocksbridge she pressed a button and the receiver up in Green Moor was arranged to give a signal.

He would then drive down and collect her.

Clever !

HD

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Let her walk ! Is it hilly round there ? he he

I used to work with a chap that lived right on the top of the hill at Green Moor.

His wife worked evenings in Sheffield with variable finishing times.

In the days before mobile phones she used to keep a small radio control transmitter as used by modellers in her bag.

When she got off the bus down in Stocksbridge she pressed a button and the receiver up in Green Moor was arranged to give a signal.

He would then drive down and collect her.

Clever !

HD

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Let her walk ! Is it hilly round there ? he he

Well it's 500 feet ASL by the Town Hall bus stop and about 900 feet ASL up Hunshelf Bank at Chapel Lane, 'so I guess you could say it was hilly. It's also a walk of about one and a half miles by road along some of the most lonely, spooky lanes you could imagine.

You have to climb Pea Royd Lane which in more recent times has been the site of spooky goings on, ghostly children playing ring 'o roses around the base of a pylon, headless monks and something that scared the living daylights out of two big bobbies sat in their squad car.

I've driven up there in the dead of night to repair the BSC transmitter mast at the top of the hill and I used to keep my clog down and didn't admire the view too closely.

HD

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You have to climb Pea Royd Lane which in more recent times has been the site of spooky goings on, ghostly children playing ring 'o roses around the base of a pylon, headless monks and something that scared the living daylights out of two big bobbies sat in their squad car.

HD

Yes, it's amzing what fun you can have with a radio control transmitter and receivers built into some well designed spooky theatrical equipment B) :ph34r:

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I thought this one might have been put on but I have looked be can't find it so here it is.

They need working phones in High Bradfield as there doesn't seem to be any mobile

network connections in the area.

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Don't know if anyone has mentioned this before but we went on holiday in the Cotswolds earlier this year and found some villages have turned their phone boxes into defibrillator points of access. Many villagers are trained to use them but as the machine tells you what to do anyone can actually use them in an emergency situation. Another village uses theirs as a book swop place. They have installed bookshelves and people leave books they have read and pick up one they haven't read. Can't see that working in Sheffield though!

Lyn

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Can't see that working in Sheffield though!

Lyn

Can't even see a telephone box working in Sheffield lol

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This box has been removed

Blimey, them scrap lads'll have it away with anything!

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Has any one seen this done to a telephone box before?

It has been converted into a cash card machine , taken in Llandudno.

Landudno_Aug_15.thumb.JPG.dd006b5c17bf5fLandudno_Aug_15_-_Copy.thumb.JPG.41c67de

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No but in the Upper Slaughter area of Gloucestershire they have defibrillators in them due to it being a rural area.

Lyn 

sorry just realized I had already posted that some time ago.

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Has any one seen this done to a telephone box before?

It has been converted into a cash card machine , taken in Llandudno.

Landudno_Aug_15.thumb.JPG.dd006b5c17bf5fLandudno_Aug_15_-_Copy.thumb.JPG.41c67de

There is one in Carlisle, on the road where I work

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