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grahamfutter

Hadfields of Sheffield

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:( HADFIEILD OF SHEFFIELD.

I WAS A LOCO DRIVER @HADFIELD,

ARE THER ANY PEOPLE LEFT,

Welcome Graham, Hope you enjoy the site - hav you any stories of your time at Hadfields to share - we'd love to hear them :)

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Welcome Graham, Hope you enjoy the site - hav you any stories of your time at Hadfields to share - we'd love to hear them :)

Where and when to start , I had a blue print of Hadfield but I cannot find it with moving home but I know the layout of the firm, great to hear from you, thank you.

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where do whent to start , ihad a blue print of hadhield but i cannot find it with moving home but i know the lay out of the firm, grate to hear from you, thank you.

Hadfields at East Hecla Works on Vulcan Road was truly one of the great Sheffield firms, and it is a tragedy that it has disappeared. I worked in the offices there for a short time in the 1950s --in the Sales R department, where the boss was a guy called Jack Bowles. I cannot imagine that any of the people who were in that office with me are still around, for most of them were a lot older than me. My closest colleague at that time was a lad called Mike Williams, and I believe he later ran a ppst office somewhere in the Sheffield area, but, sadly, he died a few years ago.

I know that one of the people in the metallurgy department was the famous old Sheffield United player Harry Johnson, who scored more than 200 goals for the Blades. In that department, too, there was a man called Knowles.

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Where and when to start , I had a blue print of Hadfield but I cannot find it with moving home but I know the layout of the firm, great to hear from you, thank you.

I know Hadfields had the Hecla and East Hecla plants - did they own any others? Where was your Loco based? Took this photo down by the River Don.

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Hadfields at East Hecla Works on Vulcan Road was truly one of the great Sheffield firms, and it is a tragedy that it has disappeared. I worked in the offices there for a short time in the 1950s --in the Sales R department, where the boss was a guy called Jack Bowles. I cannot imagine that any of the people who were in that office with me are still around, for most of them were a lot older than me. My closest colleague at that time was a lad called Mike Williams, and I believe he later ran a ppst office somewhere in the Sheffield area, but, sadly, he died a few years ago.

I know that one of the people in the metallurgy department was the famous old Sheffield United player Harry Johnson, who scored more than 200 goals for the Blades. In that department, too, there was a man called Knowles.

HI OC ST A very good friend of mine was the assisant chief engineer, at the time you speak of, his name was Stanley Pell did you know him Skeets

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A bit of Hadfields' output, still on show:

 

post-6334-1242660588_thumb.jpg

 

Hadfields manganese steel was very frequently used on tramways for point work and sharp curves.

 

This example is in Broad Street, Portsmouth (near Portsmouth Point). The tram service on this track was abandoned in 1936, replaced by trolleybuses, many of which had bodywork by Cravens of Sheffield!

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Either the blades on this penknife were made with Hadfield's Steel or it is a promotional item for the company. I'm thinking it dates to the late 1800s or very early 1900s. Does anyone know about the Dawes Co? Any information greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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Hi,

my father was a shunter at Hadfields around about 1960's,

his name was Stan Frith.

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HI THERE

MY IS GRAHAM FUTTER AND WAS A LOCO DRIVER , YES I REMEMBER STAN HE WORKED WITH US AT HADFIELDS GREAT DAYS FOR ME ,HE WORK WITH GORGE AND DAVID, david lives on bellhouse road sheffield,

grahamfutter@hotmail.com

hope to he from you.

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I know Hadfields had the Hecla and East Hecla plants - did they own any others? Where was your Loco based? Took this photo down by the River Don.

:) hi there iworked at hadfield East Hecla at vulcan rd sheffield,

:angry: sorry to this is why medowhall shoping center is.

graham

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Hadfields at East Hecla Works on Vulcan Road was truly one of the great Sheffield firms, and it is a tragedy that it has disappeared. I worked in the offices there for a short time in the 1950s --in the Sales R department, where the boss was a guy called Jack Bowles. I cannot imagine that any of the people who were in that office with me are still around, for most of them were a lot older than me. My closest colleague at that time was a lad called Mike Williams, and I believe he later ran a ppst office somewhere in the Sheffield area, but, sadly, he died a few years ago.

I know that one of the people in the metallurgy department was the famous old Sheffield United player Harry Johnson, who scored more than 200 goals for the Blades. In that department, too, there was a man called Knowles.

Hi, 1st post as I only 'happened' across this forum whilst, ironically, googling 'Hadfields' earlier. Mike Williams was my father - and joined Hadfields after completing his RAF national service in the early 50s - starting off as a clerk and then becoming one of the few non-degree qualified employees to be put through their new [at the time] graduate apprentice scheme - eventually becoming their Marketing Manager & travelling all over the world on the Company's behalf including to the states (when I was only 6 weeks old as my mother regularly reminded him!). He ''left'' in 1978 - shortly after the unsuccessful takeover bid for the company by Firth Brown resulted in Hadfields being bought out by Lonhro, under Tiny Rowland. Lonhro had promised no redundancies when they took over the helm - but the writing on the wall quickly became clear that this organisation with comparatively limited experience in this arena were really ultimately only interested in asset stripping & maximising the return on their original investment by steering the company toward its ultimate closure. Dad disagreed once too often with decisions being made at that time & was ultimately given the choice of leaving with his company car & on the remainder of his then current contract - or simply seeing it not being renewed the following year.

Whilst all the above is relaid as I recall the way in which the information was imparted to me many moons ago - I do know Dad had many, many happy memories of the 24 years he spent working at the East Hecla works; he met & married my mum (Fay Hudson who worked in the Hadfields lab), met one of his childhood heroes Douglas Bader (of 'Reach for the Sky' fame who visited the works) & met & made many, many good friends over the years. He often used to say that it was the people who made a workplace good or bad - and that Hadfields was a great place to work in that respect.

Conversely, his watching & seeing the ultimate outcome of the strikes at the end of the 70s, and my taking him back up there from his home in Cornwall many years later to see 'Meadow Hall' - were most certainly memories he would undoubtedly rather not have had. He certainly found the latter particularly traumatic - seeing a singular statue on the ground floor of the meadowhall complex as an apparent singular reminder of the sites former use most certainly did not, he felt, bare suitable memorial to all that was acheived & undertaken in the vicinity for so many years and by so many people. This said, at the time we visited I believe the local pub where he & colleagues occasionally met for lunch et al still remained standing!

I still have some of the Hadfields in house magazines and also some of the engraved ashtrays, parker pens, calculators & magnifying glasses Hadfields commissioned as gifts for current & prospective customers too - and have many photographs of the site and vivid memories of visiting Dad at work myself.

It would be great to hear from anyone who knew him or indeed to read of further memories of people who worked at Hadfields, too; I've certainly found it very interesting reading through all the memories recorded here

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Hi, 1st post as I only 'happened' across this forum whilst, ironically, googling 'Hadfields' earlier.

Some of us have been waiting years for you, what kept you ???

Welcome to the Site, free, polite and helpful - that's us; never the fastest or wildest of Sites, we do our best and we hope you find something of interest here and are able to contribute to our collective knowledge of things, people and places from times gone by.

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Some of us have been waiting years for you, what kept you ???

Welcome to the Site, free, polite and helpful - that's us; never the fastest or wildest of Sites, we do our best and we hope you find something of interest here and are able to contribute to our collective knowledge of things, people and places from times gone by.

Many thanks for the welcome, Richard. At the moment I'm struggling to put the laptop down and/or navigate away from the forum as I'm finding so much of interest! I hope to be able to contribute further over the ensuing months - it's only ever time & energy (as opposed to inclination) that seems to slow me down these days - though I don't know why (perhaps its just getting older!) but I've found myself thinking of and looking back fondly upon my childhood & schooling in Shefffield increasingly often of late. Sorry I didn't 'happen across' you all sooner :)

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HI all - My dad Gordon Scothern did his apprenticeship as a fitter and turner at Hadfield's (not sure if his apprenticeship was at hecla or east hecla plants) in the 50's. Pretty sure he worked there until moving down south towards the later end of the 60's. He subsequently emigrated to Perth, Western Australia. Would love to see some pictures or to know if anyone here has any memories.

rgds

nafjm

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So glad to have found this thread. I'm a writer, currently working on a novel and trawling many wonderful posts on your site for research purposes.

One of my characters is going to work at Hadfields (went there after the war) so I'm fascinated by the info you all share, in particular anything post war - mid 1960's.

Deroyentz - What's the name of the pub they all went to please?

And does anyone know what other pubs might have been frequented? Any descriptions/info would be most useful. ;-)

Many thanks

D

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Picture Sheffield

Looks as though the nearest pub at that time would have been The Plumpers (Sheffield Rd)

Plumpers 1960's (Hadfields in background)

Plumpers 1960's

What super photos. Thanks so much for the info Vox.

I'd be interested to hear of any other pubs workers went to after work. I presume there were several in the vicinity - I'd picked up on a characterful looking one, 'The Bridge Inn on Meadowhall Road. Did anyone here ever frequent it? Or am I miles out on the geography? :unsure:

Really appreciate your efforts

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"Robert Abbott Hadfield was born on 28th November 1858 in the district of Attercliffe (Sheffield). His parents were Robert and Marrianne (maiden name Abbott), Robert Hadfield (senior) was a second cousin of the famous steel manufacturer Sir John Brown"

SOURCE - Full Article at tilthammer.com

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"Robert Abbott Hadfield was born on 28th November 1858 in the district of Attercliffe (Sheffield). His parents were Robert and Marrianne (maiden name Abbott), Robert Hadfield (senior) was a second cousin of the famous steel manufacturer Sir John Brown"

SOURCE - Full Article at tilthammer.com

1861 Census

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1871 Census

Belmount - heard that elsewhere ...

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1881 Census

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1891 Census

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Hadfields at East Hecla Works on Vulcan Road was truly one of the great Sheffield firms, and it is a tragedy that it has disappeared. I worked in the offices there for a short time in the 1950s --in the Sales R department, where the boss was a guy called Jack Bowles. I cannot imagine that any of the people who were in that office with me are still around, for most of them were a lot older than me. My closest colleague at that time was a lad called Mike Williams, and I believe he later ran a ppst office somewhere in the Sheffield area, but, sadly, he died a few years ago.

I know that one of the people in the metallurgy department was the famous old Sheffield United player Harry Johnson, who scored more than 200 goals for the Blades. In that department, too, there was a man called Knowles.

HI OCSK One of my best friends worked there in the offices, his name was Stan Pell he was assistant chief engineer he would be working in that era you mentioned, He was no prude, but a real gent, and all the years l knew him l never heard him utter a swear word, He rose to officer rank in the last war, did you happen to know him old canny,

Skeets.

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My late father,Hugh Campbell,known as Pete,worked in the 4-ton hammer shop from before the war until a serious works accident in 1961.

When he recovered,they gave him a job as a clerk in the No.1 machine shop.

The photos show him in the hammer shop,and on his retirement day in 1974.

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