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RichardB

Gatty's Version Of Hunters Hallamshire - Complete

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Chapter One

Pages 1 - 6

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Excellent stuff. Christmas appears to be coming early this year.

A while back, based on the description of Hallamshire given at the bottom of the 1st column on page 17—that is, including the parishes of Sheffield, Bradfield, Ecclesfield, and Hansworth—I came up with this map of the extent of Hallamshire overlaid on a map of South Yorkshire from wikipedia:

Jeremy

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Excellent stuff. Christmas appears to be coming early this year.

A while back, based on the description of Hallamshire given at the bottom of the 1st column on page 17—that is, including the parishes of Sheffield, Bradfield, Ecclesfield, and Hansworth—I came up with this map of the extent of Hallamshire overlaid on a map of South Yorkshire from wikipedia:

Jeremy

Thanks for your contribution Jeremy.

Page 19 - 24

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Page 18 has one of my favourite passages. It is an account of a tour of the boundaries of Hallamshire, during which they inspect the various stones that mark the boundaries...

"Alsoe from the said ewe-tree to a stone called Stowperstocke, which the aforesaid John Stone tooke away, and thereof made a pig-trough; and hee hath promised to sett it there againe: for hee once before, about sixteene yeares agoe, took it away, and one ould Roger Barnsley who was of the age of 80 yeares and above, did complaine upon him, and said hee had not done well in takeing it away, because it was a meere betweene my lord and the lord of Ecclesall: and the said John Stone upon Barnsley's complaint did bring it againe, and there it remained tenn years; and att the said ten yeares end, hee tooke it againe, but now he hath or will sett it there againe as it ought to be"

I'm sure that this was all taken very seriously, but it sounds very comical to me.

Does any one know if any of the boundary markers described in these passages still exist?

Jeremy

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Well done Mr. Man, only another 270 pages to scan, edit, watermark and post.

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Well done Mr. Man, only another 270 pages to scan, edit, watermark and post.

Roll on Christmas 2010

he he

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Three copies of the same scan (in case a "picture"=person wants to have a pop at it).

Mr Girling (Curate) and Dr. Gatty, from a cracked lantern slide. Picture by Cyril Slinn.

Wouldn't call myself a picture person exactly but is this any good until someone can make a better job?

Just had 1/2 hr this morning before breakfast.

I struggled a bit with the crack across the face.

You scanned at 72 ppi. I think it's easier to work on at a higher res. - 200 or 300

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Wouldn't call myself a picture person exactly but is this any good until someone can make a better job?

Just had 1/2 hr this morning before breakfast.

I struggled a bit with the crack across the face.

You scanned at 72 ppi. I think it's easier to work on at a higher res. - 200 or 300

Hi vox,

forum member Beery restored that photo way back in March,

but for some reason it never got transfered into this topic

link here

Take a look at some of his work,

he's a bit of an expert in the field of photo restoration

and not someone I would like to compete against.

Steve.

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Hi vox,

forum member Beery restored that photo way back in March,

but for some reason it never got transfered into this topic

link here

Take a look at some of his work,

he's a bit of an expert in the field of photo restoration

and not someone I would like to compete against.

Steve.

Great job, he got rid of the "moire pattern" (is that what it's called)? as well. I didn't get that far.

I wasn't trying to compete, just messing. I learned a couple of things on the way as well so it was a good exercise. Glad it got done properly anyway.

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Great job, he got rid of the "moire pattern" (is that what it's called)? as well. I didn't get that far.

I wasn't trying to compete, just messing. I learned a couple of things on the way as well so it was a good exercise. Glad it got done properly anyway.

Thanks for your effort and input; good to hear you learned a little, maybe Beery would be willing to pass on a little advice as to how to get rid of the "moire pattern".

You may have noticed I "slopey-shoulder" all matters pictorial.

[2 am, now that's an unusual time to be posting ...]

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Gatty's Hunter's History of Hallamshire (1869)

Well this may take a long time and a great deal of care to get scanned ... Gatty's update of Hunter's History of Hallamshire

The plan being to get this scanned for Christmas.

There will be limited posts before Christmas and the intention is to get you lot to research each person, each location, each event to the best of our collective ability.

If you like, to take the most respected Sheffield History resource and to breathe new life into it, with posts, comments, pictures, turtle droppings, Stardust and up to date well-researched "stuff".

Ever one for the grand gesture - this is the latest in a series of Baldrick-style cunning plans that I kick off then get sick with. This one, however, with some input, could just fly.

------------------------------------------------------------

Hunter (Birth, Marriage, Death - description/picture) ?

Gatty (Birth, Marriage, Death, Vicar of Where ? for How long ? Picture - picture done RichardB).

Modern map of Hallamshire, must be one around here somewhere - pretty poor Map link provided - RichardB.

Link to the same picture scanned from Hunter's 1819 edition (Jeremy might remember where that went to)

Hours of endless fun for enquiring minds ...

David Hey has written an extensive article on 'Gatty, Alfred, Church of England clergyman' in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. This would answer the point in your second query in one source.

In Kent, if you have a library ticket access to this is free as an online library resource just by entering the ticket number into the Log In box on the link on the library website then type Gatty into the search box.

I have not looked at Sheffield Libraries but it would be worth a try as I know many other libraries offer the same facility.

Hope this is helpful

Galena

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David Hey has written an extensive article on 'Gatty, Alfred, Church of England clergyman' in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. This would answer the point in your second query in one source.

So there is. The article is copyrighted so unfortunately we can't post the whole thing, but here are the basic facts:

Alfred Gatty

Birth -- 18 April 1813 (London)

Marriage #1 -- 8 July 1839 to Margaret Scott (1809–1873), an accomplished author who also has an entry in the DNB; 6 sons (2 died as infants) + 4 daughters

Marriage #2 -- 1 October 1884 to Mary Helen Newman (????-1919); no children

Death -- 20 January 1903

Vicar of Ecclesfield from 23 Sept 1839 to his death

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So there is. The article is copyrighted so unfortunately we can't post the whole thing, but here are the basic facts:

Alfred Gatty

Birth -- 18 April 1813 (London)

Marriage #1 -- 8 July 1839 to Margaret Scott (1809–1873), an accomplished author who also has an entry in the DNB; 6 sons (2 died as infants) + 4 daughters

Marriage #2 -- 1 October 1884 to Mary Helen Newman (????-1919); no children

Death -- 20 January 1903

Vicar of Ecclesfield from 23 Sept 1839 to his death

and his famous daughter ?

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