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Lady's Bridge

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Here's a brief history of Ladys Bridge in the city centre:

Lady's Bridge.

The original bridge which crossed the River Don at this point, way back in Henry III time of 1155 - 1189 was made of wood. In 1485 a stone bridge was erected when the Vicar of Sheffield John Plesaunce and William Hill who was a master mason, both agreed to build a bridge of stone over the "Watre of Dune neghe the Castell of Sheffield". It was to be named "The Bridge of Our Lady" because there was a chapel at the Wicker side of the bridge.

The cost of the bridge was about £67. When built it could only be crossed by pedestrians as there were steps at either end of the bridge. It was in fact just a footbridge. The bridge was altered in 1784 to enable carts to cross. Prior to this all carts had to use the Sheaf bridge which was built over the River Sheaf near the bottom of Dixon Lane which was also a bridge made of wood until it was replaced by one of stone some time later.

A view of Lady's Bridge taken from Nursery St corner. The distant stone building on the right was the County Court house, (previously, the Town Hall). The centre right building is the new magistrates court. The corner building on the left was the Bull & Mouth pub later named the Tap & Spile built in 1790 but rebuilt in 1928. The nearside left corner was where the Elephant & Castle pub once stood . The far right corner where the bus is, was where the Three Whitesmiths pub stood approx 1825 - 1898 and the nearside right corner (not quite in view) was the Lady's Bridge pub (formerley Brewer on the Bridge, Brewery Tap now closed).

Information taken from: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~e...ts/ladysbdg.htm

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Gramps    0

When built it could only be crossed by pedestrians as there were steps at either end of the bridge. It was in fact just a footbridge. The bridge was altered in 1784 to enable carts to cross. Prior to this all carts had to use the Sheaf bridge which was built over the River Sheaf near the bottom of Dixon Lane which was also a bridge made of wood until it was replaced by one of stone some time later.

Information taken from: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~e...ts/ladysbdg.htm

The web site quoted here seems to have been taken down, but a little research suggests that the claim that Lady's bridge was merely a foot bridge is unfounded.

The first assertion I've met with that the only approach to the 1485 Lady's Bridge was via steps and that wheeled traffic was forced to use the Sheaf Bridge, is in R.E. Leader's Sheffield in the Eighteenth Century (1905). This claim was repeated by A.L. Armstrong in his account of the excavations of Sheffild Castle and by Charles Drury in his article on Sheffield Castle in the book A Sheaf of Essays by a Sheffield Antiquary (1929).

However in his lecture Sheffield's Old Roads, R.E. Leader takes the opposite view and tells us that in 1607 the passage from Rotherham to Sheffield was via Wasford bridge and that the road went "by Royd's Mill to the somewhat higher level of Carlisle Street, past Hall Car and down Spital Hill to the Wicker." He also quotes the account of the chaplain to the Earl of Oxford who travelled from Rotherham to Sheffield in 1725 "Then, after crossing the Don twice more, the first, I think, over Washford, and the next over Lady's Bridge, we get into the town of Sheffield".

From an examination of the bridge made in 1909 it was established the the original, dating from 1485 was 14 feet 8 inches wide; qute wide enough to allow two waggons of the period to comfortably pass each other. Why build a bridge of such width if it was intended only for foot traffic ? The steps alluded to appear to have been provided to allow pedestrians access to the bridge from the lane known as 'Underthe-Water' which was eventually replaced by the modern Bridge street.

There are other arguments against the case that Lady's Bridge was merely a footbridge; the fact that in the 17th. century the West Riding Justices assumed responsibility for the repair and maintainence of both the Washford and Lady's bridges beacause of their importance as "the common passage betweene Sheffeld and Rotherham and so betweene Yorkshire and Derbyshire in those partes", is one. Another was the annual muster of the Gilbert's private army on 'Sembley Green; many of these men with their arms, armour and their horses would have come in from the west of Sheffield and it seems unlikely that they would have been expected to use the round-about route of the Sheaf bridge and Washford bridge to get to the Wicker.

Finally there is no suggestion on Gosling's plan of 1736 that Lady's Bridge was anything other than a road bridge and available for wheeled traffic. As far as is known the bridge at that time had been little altered from its original medieval construction.

The alternative routes into Sheffield from Rotherham can be seen on this plan of 1795 by Wm. Fairbank.

Ladys bridge has been widened several times. The first was in 1761 when the Almshouses that were formerly the Lady Chapel were also pulled down to widen the approach road. In 1785 the bridge may have again been widened, it was in this year that two properties on the western side of Waingate were purchased and pulled down at the expense of the Burgery, possibly in connection with the construction of the new Bridge street. This wideneing of the bridge may have been in conjuntion with the turnpiking of the road to Wakefield.

In 1865 the West Riding Magistrates contributed to a widening of the bridge by 14 feet and in 1909 the bridge was again widened by a further 10 feet.

1761 may also be the date that the Bridge street on Gosling's map was fancifully renamed to Waingate.

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Gramps very interesting thanks,

Funny how things change - came across reference to Lady's Bridge today in the Story of Sheffield by John Derry "The ways out of the town,even after wheeled vehicles came into use and roads were widened, were different from those we now use. For instance, the way to Barnsley was not be Burngeave Road, but you crossed Lady Bridge - a narrow bridge which has been widened again and again - went by Nursery Street to Bridgehouses, and then tackled the steep acsent up Pyebank and Pitsmoor." I thought Burngeave Road was bad enough!

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Gramps    0

Gramps very interesting thanks,

Funny how things change - came across reference to Lady's Bridge today in the Story of Sheffield by John Derry "The ways out of the town,even after wheeled vehivles came into use and roads were widened, were different from those we now use. For instance, the way to Barnsley was not be Burngeave Road, but you crossed Lady Bridge - a narrow bridge which has been widened again and again - went by Nursery Street to Bridgehouses, and then tackled the steep acsent up Pyebank and Pitsmoor." I thought Burngeave Road was bad enough!

The road to Barnsley and Wakefield was turnpiked in around 1758/9 and Burngreave road was built to provide an easier route for the horses but wasn't opened until 1835/6. I think coach passengers were expected to get out and push going up Pye Bank, - wouldn't fancy sitting on top of a coach coming down :blink:

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Bayleaf    2

The following article is reproduced from the Transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society, Volume 1, page 237, by kind permission of the Society

(http://www.shef.ac.uk/archaeology/hunter/index.html)

LADY'S BRIDGE, SHEFFIELD.

Mr. J. R. Wigfull writes:-

By the courtesy of Mr. H. R: Hepworth, Deputy Surveyor for the West Riding, I have had the privilege of examining a number of drawings and other documents relating to Lady's Bridge, which are preserved at the County Hall, Wakefield.

The earliest drawing is contained in a book entitled "Book of the Bridges." It was prepared in 1752 by Robert Carr and John Watson, and contains plans and elevations of all bridges in the West Riding which were reparable at the expense of the County. Notes have been added at later dates showing when additions or alterations were made. The information concerning Lady's Bridge is as follows:

This Bridge is built of hewn Stone, there is a quick descent from under the Bridge which is set with strong Stones and cramp'd with iron, maintains the Road at South End from springing of Arch 18 feet and at the North 32 feet.

On the same page, and below the above description, there are drawings of the plan and west elevation of the bridge. These show the mediaeval bridge of five pointed arches, with the roadway rising from either side to a point above the second pier from the north or Wicker end. The pointed cutwater of this pier was carried up to the roadway, and the parapet was continued round it so as to afford a space for foot passengers to stand when other traffic was passing over the bridge.

The width of the bridge is figured 14 feet 6 inches, the thickness of the piers 6 feet, and the openings of the arches are given as 21 feet, 21 feet, 20 feet, 22 feet and 23 feet respectively, commencing from the north end. These latter dimensions do not agree with those taken when the bridge was widened in 1909, but the discrepancy is no doubt due to error in figuring the original drawing, for there is absolutely no evidence that the mediaeval portion of the bridge has been rebuilt.

Taking the figures on the plan, the length of roadway over the bridge itself was 131 feet, or with the approaches 181 feet, the whole being reparable by the County.

A drawing dated 1865 shows six arches, and a length of roadway over them of 162 feet. The lengths of the approaches at this time are given as 49 feet at the Wicker end and 8 feet at that near Waingate, making a total length of 219 feet reparable by the County.

There seems no evidence of the date when the extra piece of roadway was taken over by the County, or of when the sixth arch was erected. It seems reasonable to suppose that the sixth arch was added when the bridge was widened for the second time, and also that the variation in the length of the roadway repaired by the County dates from the same period.

The "Book of the Bridges" also contains an elevation showing a bridge of five arches entitled

"Sheffield Bridge as widened 9 Feet on the West Side in 1760.7"

This confirms the suggestion made on t,. 60, supra, that the first widening took place about that year. This drawing agrees in all respects with the bridge shown in Mr. Earl's etching reproduced on p. 5, except that the latter shows the sixth arch at the end next the Wicker.

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RichardB    1

Thank you, great stuff. Please pass on the Thanks of SH to HAS, hopefully by our research/discussion/updated links to other sites/insults and punchups about places that haven't existed for 128 years we can liven up the articles.

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DaveH    4

Officially reopened last year by a councillor and a well known and respected local musician Richard Hawley.

Many of Richards songs are about Sheffield places and are frequently named after them. One of his titles is "Lady's Bridge"

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Skipindave    0

Regarding lady's Bridge,on picture Sheffield there is photo of an old tramp looking chap named Moss,selling Lace on this bridge.

Has anyone seen anything in print about this chap,I suspect he should be in my tree,along with Albert Moss of Heeley,who bears a strong likeness.

skipindave <_<

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Bayleaf    2

This is another article about the bridge from the transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society, Vol 1, page 57, and is reproduced by kind permission of the Society

(And thanks to Gramps for his help)

LADY'S BRIDGE, SHEFFIELD.

BY JAMES R. WIGFULL, A.R.I.E.A.

__________________

The will of George, Fourth Earl of Shrewsbury, directed :

"That three priests, for the space of twenty years, next after his decease, should sing for his soul; whereof two in the Parish Church of Sheffield, at the Altar where the Lady Anne, his first wife lay interred; and the other in the Chappel of our Blessed Lady of the Bridge in Sheffield; and every of them to have eight marks yearly during that time."

The Earl died in 1538, and, nine years later, the Act confiscating the revenues of Chantries swept away both priest and masses, and the Chapel itself was devoted to secular purposes.

The accounts of the Shrewsbury family show that in 1572 it was used as a wool warehouse, and at a later date it was occupied as an Almshouse. The Shrewsbury accounts for 1592 contain evidence of this, as shown by the following entry :

" It. payd ye 27th of Mrche 1592 to ye poore folks that are in ye Allmes howse at Sheff Brydg for their qrtr annuyty endyd at Or- Ladye Daye 1592, viz to Tho. Buntting 5/- vidua Bamfforde 5/- vid hellyefelde 5/- & to Elizabeth Corke 5/- --------20/- payd”

Similar payments occur in other years, and it may be that the Charity founded in his will by Earl Gilbert was based upon this smaller scheme, originated by his predecessors, and continued by him.

It is not until 1657 that entries concerning the Almshouse are found in the Burgery Accounts, the first being :

"To the post for a letter sent up to Mr. Moseley about the Almes house,"

followed shortly afterwards by an amount spent upon

"a pint of sack to Mr. Halton,"

and at an interview with this gentleman and Mr. Radcliffe, principal agent of the Earl of Arundel,

"when wee spoke to them about trees for the Alms house."

Evidently timber for the contemplated alteration.

The accounts for this and the following year contain numerous items for building work and materials amounting to more than £160, all of which are directly traceable to the Almshouse.

The spending of such a relatively large sum suggests an entire, or almost entire, reconstruction of the building. Possibly, after the Civil War, the building came into possession of the Burgery, and this body, after due deliberation, set itself to put the place in order.

The Burgery accounts contain constant payments for work done at the Almshouse until 1761, when a sum of £1 1s, one of other similar entries, is made for

"a years rent of a Room for Eliz. Clayton, removed out of the Almshouses in order to their being pulled down."

Gosling's plan of Sheffield, dated 1736, marks the position of the Almshouses as close to the bridge, and on the eastern side of Waingate, labelled by him "Bridge Street." Doubtless the chapel, of which they were the immediate successors, stood in the same position, at the side of the approach, and not actually on the bridge or attached to one of the piers as is the case at Rotherham.

The site of the Almshouses has been absorbed by the present roadway, but its position seems to have been in front of the castellated saleshop now situated between the bridge and the entrance to the slaughter houses. A plan by W. Fairbank, dated 1771, and now in the Norfolk Estates Office, shows a small plot of land in this position, having a frontage of about eleven yards, and marked "Town's Land containing 42 yds."

A plan by the same surveyor, prepared in 1789, to show an exchange of land between the Town and the Duke of Norfolk, states that this particular site is in the occupation of Joseph Scena, and the area is given as 46 yards.

The bridge referred to in the will of the fourth Earl of Shrewsbury was erected during the later years of the fifteenth century, but there is evidence of a bridge in the same position in the latter part of the twelfth century.

The Charter of William de Lovetot, granting a piece of land for the Hospital of St. Leonard, in which the land is referred to as " juxta pontem Done," dates between the years 1161 and 1181. The late Mr. J. D. Leader, in an article upon this subject published in the Sheffield Miscellany, February, 1897, suggested that the "Spittle Garden " shown on Gosling's plan, and which occupied nearly all the ground between Johnson Street, Nursery Street and the Wicker, was the piece of land "near the bridge of the Don" upon which the Hospital formerly stood.

During the year 1909, Lady's Bridge was widened upon its eastern side, and the work then in progress rendered it possible to examine the structure from below. Three previous widenings could be traced, at the sides of a bridge of a distinctly mediaeval type.

The width of this early bridge is 14 ft. 8 ins. The arches are five in number. Their spans vary slightly but average about 21ft., and the piers between and supporting the arches are 6 ft. in thickness. The ends of the piers are hidden by later work, but no doubt originally they had pointed cutwaters of the usual type. The arches are segmental pointed; the point is very slight, and each curve seems to have been struck from two centres. The soffits of the three arches nearest to Waingate have each five stone ribs. These are square in section, with the exception of the two external ones, which are chamfered on their outer edges, as are also the edges of the arch stones adjoining them.

Similar arches occur in the bridge at Rotherham. The ribs are missing in the two arches nearest to the Wicker, and it has been suggested that these have been rebuilt. These arches appeared to the writer to have a pointed form, and traces of chamfers on their outer edges, features which led him to believe that the ribs only had been removed, and that the arches themselves were the original ones. The stone employed is a coarse grit similar to that found in the Rivelin district or upon Wadsley Common.

There can be no doubt that this is the bridge erected under the agreement dated 1485, and made between

"Syr John Plesaunce Vicar of Sheffield, and William Hyll of the same miaster mason." The agreement is given by Hunter, who unfortunately omits to state the source of his reference. Can anyone give this information ? The agreement is of interest, and runs as follows :

"This Indenture berys wytness that Syr John Plesaunce vicar of Sheffield and William Hyll of the same miaster mason have bargained for the makyng of a Brygge of ston undyr this fourme that follows : yat is to wytt; that the said William Hyll shall make a sufficient brigge over the watyr of Dune neghe the castell of Sheffeld, wele and sufficiently after the sight of workmen of the same crafte and gode men of the parysh. The whych shall be made V. arches embowed, (vaulted) nil. jowels, (piers) and n. heedys, with sure butments at eythyr ende.

Also the sayd William shall mak of his own costys all mason worke, and he shall pay for the clensyng of the ground werk for all his partners, and his scaffyld makyng. The stoppyng of the watyr, and the makyng of centres shall be of both theyr costys equally deelyd.

And the said Syr John Plesaunce shall cause all manner of stuff nedeful to the said werk to be brought to the grounde of the parysh cost, yat is to say, lyme, ston, sande, and tymber, to mak the centres of the scaffaldys and all oder thyng yat long to the werk. And the said William shall hafe for the makyng of it a C. markys to be paid like as the werke is wroght; and when the thyrd part of the brygg is fully fynyshyd, the said William shall be content and paid of XXIIl. IIs. IIId. And when the second part is fynyshyd he shall hafe in likewise.

Also the said William has promysed by these Indentures yatt the said werke shall goe forthe contynually and not lie undone in his defaulte, upon payne of forfetyng XLs. Also the said Syr John has promysed by these Indentures also, that the aforesaid payment shall be truly kept on his behalfe, upon payne of forfetyng XLs.

And to all these covenants and syngler afore rehersed truly to be kept on eythyr party, the sayd Syr John and William to these Indentures enterchangeably have set theyr sealys, these beyring wytteness, Nycholas Wortley gentylman, Richard Barnbe gentylman, John Wykersley gentylman, Robert Bytry, Richard Trippett, Richard Wyott, William Jackson, and others. Gyfen at Sheffeld the XX day of the moneth February in the yere of the reigne of Kyng Henry VII. after the conquest of England the fyrst.”

John Plesaunce or Pleasaunce was appointed vicar of Sheffield on September llth, 1482, on the resignation of William Symondson. He held the office until his death in 1501. His name occurs in deeds of 1498 and 1500 given by Mr. T. Walter Hall in his Catalogue of the Ancient Charters belonging to the Twelve Capital Burgesses and Commonalty of the Town and Parish of Sheffield. The names of some of the witnesses of this agreement will also be found in the same publication.

The existing bridge contains work of apparently four periods in addition to the extension of 1909. As mentioned above, the width of the fifteenth century work is 14 ft. 8 ins. On the eastern side of it is an arch 13 ft. 1 in. in width, adjoining it on the western side is one 9 ft. 9 ins. in width, and beyond this is another, having a width of 14 ft. 2 ins.

Various initials and dates are cut on the piers, amongst which are, on the first pier—counting from Waingate—of the fifteenth century bridge, and on its northern side: RL 1740, RP 1835 ; on the southern side of the next pier: ISE 1769; while on the eastern extension of the first pier is cut: EW 1861. These probably record the dates when repairs were carried out, as they do not agree with those when the bridge is known to have been widened.

Hunter tells us that :

"The Lady's Bridge is now repaired by the West Riding according to a decision of the justices of the peace at the sessions for that riding held at Pontefract in 1689".

The widenings of the bridge were probably carried out at the expense of the County, as no sums sufficient for this purpose are included in the Burgery Accounts. The only amount in these accounts which shows payment for work of an extensive nature is in 1787, and is for " Cash paid George Blagden in part for making the arch under the water."

A further payment for "Mason's Work" was made to him in the following year. These items probably refer to work in connexion with the formation of Bridge Street, which was done about this time, and on a site then known as " under the water."

Lady's Bridge was widened in 1761, evidently at the expense of the West Riding, for the Burgery Accounts record in 1760 the payment of £21 5s. 6d. "To Mr. Thomas Watson at treating the Justices when the Bridge was let," and other sums "for liquor" for the workmen when the first and last stones were laid.

Fairbank's plan of 1771, to which reference has been made, shows the bridge about 24ft in width. This agrees with the width of the fifteenth century bridge, plus the first added portion on the western side, and suggests that until 1760 the narrow mediaeval bridge sufficed for the traffic, and, further, that the first widening was done on the western side.

The Almshouses, which were pulled down about 1761, "stood on the eastern side, but their removal may have been due to a desire to widen the approach to the bridge on that side of the street. In 1785 and 1786 the Burgery Accounts record payments for two houses purchased to pull down to widen the bridge and street. These may have been required in connexion with the opening out of Bridge Street, but as a payment was made to

"men at Lady's Bridge for ale at finishing,"

it is possible that a further widening was done about this time. Fairbank's plan of 1789, mentioned above, shows little more than the approach to the bridge, so that it is impossible to fix an exact dimension for the width of it at this time.

The etching of the bridge, made by the late Mr. H. H. Earl in 1844, shows the ribbed mediaeval arch about the centre of the width. The cut-waters on the piers are shown to have sloped set-offs, and above these, piers of shallow projection are carried up to the coping of the stone parapet wall. An additional, or sixth arch, is shown at the Wicker end of the bridge, probably for the goit to the Wicker Tilt. This arch appears on Gosling's plan and also on the Ordnance plan of 1851, on which the bridge is shown about 38ft. in width.

In 1852 an agitation in favour of the widening of the bridge was commenced, but it was not until 1865, thirteen years later that the West Riding Magistrates agreed to contribute the sum of £700 from the County Rate towards the cost of the work,

"on condition that they were released from further liability of maintenance."

At this time 14ft. was added to the width of the bridge, the stone parapets were removed and the present cast iron parapets were erected.

The widening of 1909 added about 10ft. to the width of the bridge. The extended roadway is carried on girders supported by iron columns which rest on stone foundations, and the cast iron parapet, dating from 1865, has been refixed.

The present appearance is distinctly modern, and it is difficult to realize that, embedded in its centre, is a structure built more than four and a quarter centuries ago, yet such is the case. Truly did William Hyll carry out his agreement, doing his work

"well and sufficiently after the sight of workmen of the same crafte and gode men of the parysh."

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RichardB    1

Excellent; Thanks to HAS, Gramps and you.

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DaveH    4

Lady's Bridge today

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RichardB    1

Lady's Bridge today

Nice picture, Thank you - taken from near the toilets ? Do thet still exist ?

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DaveH    4

Nice picture, Thank you - taken from near the toilets ? Do thet still exist ?

Don't know, - perhaps some will be able to tell us in that public toilets thread.

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DaveH    4

Another picture taken from the same location but looking up the river (out towards Kelham Island and Hillsborough) away from Lady's Bridge.

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Stuart0742    4

Don't know, - perhaps some will be able to tell us in that public toilets thread.

That photo was taken from Riverside West behind the old Whitbreads Brewery, the toilets are the otherside of the Bridge on the corner of Blonk St

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DaveH    4

That photo was taken from Riverside West behind the old Whitbreads Brewery, the toilets are the otherside of the Bridge on the corner of Blonk St

The picture was taken from Riverside West.

If the toilets Richard is refering to are the ones on Blonk Street then they have already been mentioned in the toilets thread.

Blonk Street Bogs

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THYLACINE    2

Took these photos in 1978, first trip back to Sheffield after emigrating. Almost certain they are from Lady's Bridge - could they be from anywhere else? Does it look anything like this now? Are any of these buildings still there?

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David2468    0

Here's a brief history of Ladys Bridge in the city centre:

Lady's Bridge.

The original bridge which crossed the River Don at this point, way back in Henry III time of 1155 - 1189 was made of wood. In 1485 a stone bridge was erected when the Vicar of Sheffield John Plesaunce and William Hill who was a master mason, both agreed to build a bridge of stone over the "Watre of Dune neghe the Castell of Sheffield". It was to be named "The Bridge of Our Lady" because there was a chapel at the Wicker side of the bridge.

The cost of the bridge was about £67. When built it could only be crossed by pedestrians as there were steps at either end of the bridge. It was in fact just a footbridge. The bridge was altered in 1784 to enable carts to cross. Prior to this all carts had to use the Sheaf bridge which was built over the River Sheaf near the bottom of Dixon Lane which was also a bridge made of wood until it was replaced by one of stone some time later.

A view of Lady's Bridge taken from Nursery St corner. The distant stone building on the right was the County Court house, (previously, the Town Hall). The centre right building is the new magistrates court. The corner building on the left was the Bull & Mouth pub later named the Tap & Spile built in 1790 but rebuilt in 1928. The nearside left corner was where the Elephant & Castle pub once stood . The far right corner where the bus is, was where the Three Whitesmiths pub stood approx 1825 - 1898 and the nearside right corner (not quite in view) was the Lady's Bridge pub (formerley Brewer on the Bridge, Brewery Tap now closed).

Information taken from: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~e...ts/ladysbdg.htm

Hi, I was looking for information about Sheffield's masonry arch bridges and came upon this thread, (Really useful as it is) but i was wondering if you or anyone else had information about a very similar bridge that spans Shued hill and supports commercial street at the park square end. It looks like it could be the remnants of another bridge that crossed the river where the Supertam bridge is now. There are only two arches however it looks like it from exactly the same time as lady's bridge. Any info would be incredibly useful as i am yet to find anything.Thanks very much David

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hilldweller    0

Hi, I was looking for information about Sheffield's masonry arch bridges and came upon this thread, (Really useful as it is) but i was wondering if you or anyone else had information about a very similar bridge that spans Shued hill and supports commercial street at the park square end. It looks like it could be the remnants of another bridge that crossed the river where the Supertam bridge is now. There are only two arches however it looks like it from exactly the same time as lady's bridge. Any info would be incredibly useful as i am yet to find anything.Thanks very much David

If you look on the websites run by those brave souls (well that's one description) that explore culverts, drains and sewers, you will find references to "The Megatron".

This is the huge culvert system that carries the River Sheaf under the station and through to it's junction with the Don at Blonk Street.

In several of the posts are mentions of at least one bridge, possibly more, that is/are only visible from within the culvert. It is claimed that this is the original Sheaf Bridge that was in line with the bottom of Dixon Lane.

Have a look at www.urbexforums.co.uk/index and www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums

Unless you have signed in you have to scroll through the forum looking out for Megatron. There are many fine pictures. Also try Googling Megatron Culvert.

Hope this helps.

HD

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DaveH    4

If you look on the websites run by those brave souls (well that's one description) that explore culverts, drains and sewers, you will find references to "The Megatron".

This is the huge culvert system that carries the River Sheaf under the station and through to it's junction with the Don at Blonk Street.

Now you come to mention it hilldweller, we haven't heard anything from our member Tollbar Jay since he said in some posts on here that he was going to do exactly that.

Hope he is OK. :unsure:

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SteveHB    9

Now you come to mention it hilldweller, we haven't heard anything from our member Tollbar Jay since he said in some posts on here that he was going to do exactly that.

Hope he is OK. :unsure:

I was thinking the same Dave.

hope he did not take the wrong turning/tunnel and got himself trapped under Manor Lodge.

:(

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SteveHB    9

Photograph used in a three page Steel City Report, published in 'The Times' newspaper,1985.

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Photograph used in a three page Steel City Report, published in 'The Times' newspaper,1985.

Link

Megatron

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