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A Sheffield History Bibliography


dunsbyowl1867
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The Brightside Bierlow before the Industrial Revolution

The story of an old Sheffield township and the people who lived there

by Winifred Albaya

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Bumper Book of Beanos

South Yorkshire People Reminisce about Works Outings, Trips to the Seaside and Other Merry Sprees

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Is it this map of where the bombs fell taken from the book referred to by Dunsbyowl in post #2?

In the same book is this second map of where the bombs fell showing the area south east of the city centre shown in the first map.

Stuart0742 may remember that this map shows a much discussed bomb shown as falling at the junction of Cradock and Dagnam roads, between Frithy's house and the entrance to Norfolk school. When we were at school there was little evidence that a bomb had ever fallen here.

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Zelma Katin was a 40-year-old housewife who had moved, with her husband and son, to a pleasant suburb of Sheffield in 1939. The outbreak of the Second World War turned their lives upside down: her husband was called-up and she was ordered to take a job in a either a munitions factory or in transport.

She chose transport and became a tram conductress - a 'Clippie'.

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Guest rhtinsley

Zelma Katin was a 40-year-old housewife who had moved, with her husband and son, to a pleasant suburb of Sheffield in 1939. The outbreak of the Second World War turned their lives upside down: her husband was called-up and she was ordered to take a job in a either a munitions factory or in transport.

She chose transport and became a tram conductress - a 'Clippie'.

I don't know how to post a query. Can you help me? Richard Tinsley

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Guest Old Canny Street Kid

Romance of the Wednesday

Richard Sparling

Glad you mentioned wee pipe Sparling's book. R.A. Sparling was a hero of mine when I was a boy. He was sports editor of the old Sheffield Telegraph, and he wrote "Romance of the Wednesday" in 1926. Copies of the original volumes are worth quite a lot. The one illustrated in Dunsbyowl's posting was a reprint done without permission of Sparling's surviving family, and it caused a lot of upset at the time because it was still in copyright. Whether Sparling's family were ever recompensed, I don't know; but it is an example of how in this day and age there is little respect for the rights of authors. People just lift huge chunks from a book and put these into another book, often without acknowledgement.

I mention this not as a moan, but in the hope that all our friends on Sheffield History will always remember to credit the original source.

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Guest Gramps

Sheffield's Cinemas and Theatres

Clifford H. Shaw and Stuart R. Smith, The Early Years of Cinema in Sheffield: 1896-1911, Sheffield Cinema Society, 1995

Clifford H. Shaw and Stuart R. Smith, Sheffield Cinemas - Past and Present, Sheffield Cinema Society, 1999

Clifford H. Shaw and Christopher S. Stacey, 'A Century of Cinema' in Aspects of Sheffield 2 (pp.182-200), edited by Melvyn Jones, Wharncliffe Publishing, 1999

Fred Turley, Mighty Music of the Movies: The Cinema Organ in Sheffield and the Surrounding Area, Sheaf Publishing, 1990.

Richard P. Ward, In Memory of Sheffield's Cinemas, Sheffield City Libraries, 1988

Newsletters of the Sheffield Cinema Society, 1987 onwards (copies deposited in the Sheffield Local Studies Library).

Bryen D. Hillerby, The Lost theatres of Sheffield, Wharncliffe, 1999

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Do you remember? Old Sheffield

Volumes 1 - 6. Published 1973

Published by Mail Graphics, 974 Abbeydale Road, Sheffield, S7 2QF

6 Booklets / folios, Approx 20 pages each, mainly with then & now B&W photographs (although the "now" is 1973) with a descriptive paragraph

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Markbaby reminded me of this book I have because of where he lives.

The book is "The Changing Face Of Gleadless" by the author and artist Pauline Shearstone.

This book is only available from Gleadless Townend post Office priced £9:95, although when it was first printed Pauline was selling autographed copies of her book in Gleadless Library on Whites Lane.

Apparently Pauline has another, bigger, more detailed and more expensive book called "A history of Gleadless" which is quite elusive and hard to find, wouldn't mind a copy of it if I ever see one for sale.

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Bygone Transport

Sheffield

On the Move

Some previously unseen photo's in this book

Currently £4.99 in The Works @ Meadowhall

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Newly aquired from ebay

Sheffield Its Story and Achievements by Mary Walton 1948

It has an inscription inside

To Mr Mead from J Burgin, Mrs Stacey, P Crossley, S Oliver P. Pryor Christmas 1948

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Steam Day's on BR

The Midland Line in Sheffield

Sheffield Midland to Dore plus a little bit more

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Guest Old Canny Street Kid

Eastwood's History of Ecclesfield is worth mentioning --didn't I once see somewhere on Sheffield History that someone had posted the entire book on here?

Add to novels with a local background --Put Yourself in His Place by Charles Reade. This is a novel about the Sheffield Outrages and the Flood of 1964.

The Good Lion by Len Doherty is also a novel based on Sheffield. The author was a feature writer on The Star.

Wobble To Death by Peter Lovesey is a crime novel with a Victorian setting, and Peter Lovesey based his main character on the famous Sheffield pedestrian athlete George Littlewood.

Off hand, I cannot think of the titles, but pre-war there was a journalist called J.L.Hodson who wrote a number of novels, and one or two of these were set in Sheffield.

Just to say that J L Hodson (full name James Landsdale Hodson), who died on 28th August 1956, wrote a novel called English Family, which was set in wartime Sheffield. Although his personal links with Sheffield were laregely limited to visits as a journalist (he was very well known nationally in his heyday), his brother A.E. Hodson lived in Norfolk Road and was a superintendent at Metropolitan Vickers works in the east end of Sheffield.

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