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Gleadless - Photo Thread


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Once again that same view as a 1971 to 2009 then and now.

You can tell it's not used as a terminus anymore because in the 1971 photo there is a bare patch at the edge of the grass caused by buses clipping the island. Those were the days when people only knew the word Herdings because they'd seen it on the front of a no.28 or 101 (later 51) bus.

You can see in the photo that the bus stop had one of those green painted , cast iron timetable holders on it. I know this because my brother, as a little boy, jumped off the bus and scraped his head on the underside of it!

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Gleadless Common in 1971 Viewed from near the bottom looking up towards Hurlfield Road. This picture is taken with Leadbeater Road on my left, the view shows to the left the other Leadbeater

Gleadless Junior School on Hollinsend Road. My son and youngest daughter went to this school between 1987 and 2000 when Mr. New was the headmaster. the school had a reputation due to the work of

The drainpipe at the side of the signs was fitted by me when I was an apprentice plumber in 1959.    

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You can tell it's not used as a terminus anymore because in the 1971 photo there is a bare patch at the edge of the grass caused by buses clipping the island. Those were the days when people only knew the word Herdings because they'd seen it on the front of a no.28 or 101 (later 51) bus.

You can see in the photo that the bus stop had one of those green painted , cast iron timetable holders on it. I know this because my brother, as a little boy, jumped off the bus and scraped his head on the underside of it!

Interestingly not only was this called the "terminus" outside the Castelayne nursing home but the No. 28 bus had its own "terminus" outside the main entrance to Herdings Park on Raeburn Road. Confusingly they were both refered to as just "the terminus" but locals seemed to know which one you meant as they formed part of different routes. For a relatively small estate the Herdings had 2 termini / terminuses (whatever the plural of terminus is) which was probably an indication of its position at the time as Sheffields most outlying suburb (S14), - go any further and you were in Derbyshire!

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Next picture on this walking tour of the Herdings shows the rear / side of Castelayne nursing home looking back towards the terminus along Leighton Drive. At this point Castelayne has a nice south facing view with plenty of windows to let the sun in. In good weather the elderly residents would bring their chairs out and sit in the sun along the Leighton Drive wall of Castelayne. Opposite are some 3 storey maisonettes, another style of housing, along with the terraced "town house" used on this estate.

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And once again as a 1971 - 2009 then and now

Did you sort out your spot problem lol

This is becoming a great series of photo's, like you said it was a loss to Gleadless.net, though it is this site's gain.

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Did you sort out your spot problem lol

No, these are unedited, the problem seems to have only affected a short section of the film so it is not on all the pictures.

I am not sure if it is caused by problems in development (air bubbles perhaps, as the dark spots would be undeveloped white spots on the negatives) or if it is caused by some problem with the film emulsion.

You may remember that all of these October 1971 were taken as part of my CSE Geography coursework study for Man Gill. I don't remember any spots on the original prints I did for my CSE Geography Portfolio, but unfortunately I no longer have it for comparison, - a pity realy because as well as the pictures it also contained hand drawn maps and notes about this area as it was at the time, - the sort of stuff that would fit well into this thread.

I only still have the photographs because I always kept all my negatives in a seperate file.

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No, these are unedited, the problem seems to have only affected a short section of the film so it is not on all the pictures.

I am not sure if it is caused by problems in development (air bubbles perhaps, as the dark spots would be undeveloped white spots on the negatives) or if it is caused by some problem with the film emulsion.

You may remember that all of these October 1971 were taken as part of my CSE Geography coursework study for Man Gill. I don't remember any spots on the original prints I did for my CSE Geography Portfolio, but unfortunately I no longer have it for comparison, - a pity realy because as well as the pictures it also contained hand drawn maps and notes about this area as it was at the time, - the sort of stuff that would fit well into this thread.

I only still have the photographs because I always kept all my negatives in a seperate file.

I remember, I did something on the village of Ridgeway for that same CSE exam.

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I remember, I did something on the village of Ridgeway for that same CSE exam.

But did you keep it so that you can use it in a Ridgeway Village thread?

Did you take any photos? Did you keep the negatives?

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But did you keep it so that you can use it in a Ridgeway Village thread?

Did you take any photos? Did you keep the negatives?

Simple answer is no, yes & no if you follow the questions through.

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Simple answer is no, yes & no if you follow the questions through.

So no "Lost pictures of Ridgeway" thread then :(

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Opposite are some 3 storey maisonettes, another style of housing, along with the terraced "town house" used on this estate.

Here is a view of that typical terraced town housing, viewed from the back (garden) side. These are on Morland Road. Sorry about the poor quality, taken with 9.5mm film in a Minox camera

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Here is a view of that typical terraced town housing, viewed from the back (garden) side. These are on Morland Road. Sorry about the poor quality, taken with 9.5mm film in a Minox camera

And here are those same houses from the front (pathway) side. Note those white painted fences which divided the front and rear doors of the house apart, as they were actually on the same side of the houSE! Also not that very early 1950's style of yellow sodium vapour street light on the house. They took ages to warm up, staying red for about 10 minutes before going that normal orange / yellow colour

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Oh the memories! Thank you Dave, not many people would have taken a photo of that path.

I remember as a child, walking through the allotments with my mum from Herdings through to Gleadless Road and passing through the housing estate that's visible at the end of the path as it was just being built. I said to my Mum "Wouldn't you like one of these houses?" and she said "They're too dear for us, they're £2,000 each"!

The allotment my Dad had is just out of sight , on the left hand where the path slopes steeper.

The amount of times I've cycled up and down that path, quite scary in the dark with only a dynamo driven light.

Thanks again for the posting

So how about this other footpath that goes through the woods.

This one starts on Gleadless Road opposite the Heeley and Sheffield and passes down between the end of Littlewood Road and the Working Mens Club. It drops down steeply into the woods, crosses a stream and then turns left up the hill to come out onto Leighton Road near its junction with Raeburn Road.

Another good short cut but one which can be treacherous in bad weather, and is even scarier than the allotment path on a bike.

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Next picture on this walking tour of the Herdings shows the rear / side of Castelayne nursing home looking back towards the terminus along Leighton Drive. At this point Castelayne has a nice south facing view with plenty of windows to let the sun in. In good weather the elderly residents would bring their chairs out and sit in the sun along the Leighton Drive wall of Castelayne. Opposite are some 3 storey maisonettes, another style of housing, along with the terraced "town house" used on this estate.

Continuing with our walking tour of the Herdings is this shot at the other end of Leighton Drive where it meets Morland Road. Morland Road reaches its highest point around here as it forms a giant twisting loop off of Raebeurn Road. It is not the highest road on the estate however, that award goes to Raeburn Place

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Continuing with our walking tour of the Herdings is this shot at the other end of Leighton Drive where it meets Morland Road. Morland Road reaches its highest point around here as it forms a giant twisting loop off of Raebeurn Road. It is not the highest road on the estate however, that award goes to Raeburn Place

Once again as a then & now with then in October 1971 and Now in January 2009

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Continuing with our walking tour of the Herdings is this shot at the other end of Leighton Drive where it meets Morland Road. Morland Road reaches its highest point around here as it forms a giant twisting loop off of Raeburn Road. It is not the highest road on the estate however, that award goes to Raeburn Place

Looking the other way from this same viewpoint, along Morland Road we are facing the Herdings shops, the old youth centre and those towers at the very top of the hill.

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Here is a view of that typical terraced town housing, viewed from the back (garden) side. These are on Morland Road. Sorry about the poor quality, taken with 9.5mm film in a Minox camera

Now available in colour!

Betcha can't guess which was my bedroom? ;-)

The only other place I've seen this design of house is at intake. If anybody knows of any more I'd love to see them.

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Now available in colour!

Betcha can't guess which was my bedroom? ;-)

The only other place I've seen this design of house is at intake. If anybody knows of any more I'd love to see them.

The middle bedroom appears to be yours, the one directly above the back door into the kitchen. Its that Radio Hallam sticker you use as your avitar that gives it away.

You said once before in the "when we had real snow" thread that this was Morland Close. The house in the picture appears to be at a very angular corner where the Morland Close block (shown in picture?) and a similar block on Leighton Road meet at an angle.

Is the house shown number 21 which is at the most angular corner as it is at a fork point, Morland Close having more terraced blocks than Leighton Road can cater for.

If its not number 21 it must be either number 11, - also on a very angular but not forked corner, or number 1 at a fairly straight, only slightly angular corner. This assumes my house numbering is correct and matches that on the lower part of Morland Road immediately below these blocks.

By the way, I live at Intake and I don't know where this similar housing style is, - do you have a street name for it?

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The middle bedroom appears to be yours, the one directly above the back door into the kitchen. Its that Radio Hallam sticker you use as your avitar that gives it away.

You said once before in the "when we had real snow" thread that this was Morland Close. The house in the picture appears to be at a very angular corner where the Morland Close block (shown in picture?) and a similar block on Leighton Road meet at an angle.

Is the house shown number 21 which is at the most angular corner as it is at a fork point, Morland Close having more terraced blocks than Leighton Road can cater for.

If its not number 21 it must be either number 11, - also on a very angular but not forked corner, or number 1 at a fairly straight, only slightly angular corner. This assumes my house numbering is correct and matches that on the lower part of Morland Road immediately below these blocks.

By the way, I live at Intake and I don't know where this similar housing style is, - do you have a street name for it?

By jove Holmes! Spot on on both counts with the bedroom & no. 21

The other houses are on Hollybank Drive. Not sure if this is Intake or Richmond

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By jove Holmes! Spot on on both counts with the bedroom & no. 21

The other houses are on Hollybank Drive. Not sure if this is Intake or Richmond

I think Hollybank Drive is on the other side of Mansfield Road / Birley Moor Road to us so I have not really noticed them but in the picture they certainly look like the same build, and running them parrallel to the road instead of perpendicular to it would at least give you somewhere to park a car which was possibly the biggest drawback of the Herdings houses, - not that a lot of people owned cars when they were built in the late 1950's.

Some of the houses at the end of blocks, and yours was more than likely one of them, seem to have extra windows in the "end", something not possible in mid terrace as the window would just look into someone elses house! I'm talking here of the original design and not of any modifications made by tennants who later bought their council house and redesigned it. I'm not sure which room the extra window went into and even if the internal layout of downstairs rooms was the same in the end of terrace houses as it was in the rest. If it was, then depending on which end of the terrace you were at the extra window would either be into a living room / staircase hallway or if at the other end into a kitchen / pantry or utility room.

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I think Hollybank Drive is on the other side of Mansfield Road / Birley Moor Road to us so I have not really noticed them but in the picture they certainly look like the same build, and running them parrallel to the road instead of perpendicular to it would at least give you somewhere to park a car which was possibly the biggest drawback of the Herdings houses, - not that a lot of people owned cars when they were built in the late 1950's.

Some of the houses at the end of blocks, and yours was more than likely one of them, seem to have extra windows in the "end", something not possible in mid terrace as the window would just look into someone elses house! I'm talking here of the original design and not of any modifications made by tennants who later bought their council house and redesigned it. I'm not sure which room the extra window went into and even if the internal layout of downstairs rooms was the same in the end of terrace houses as it was in the rest. If it was, then depending on which end of the terrace you were at the extra window would either be into a living room / staircase hallway or if at the other end into a kitchen / pantry or utility room.

To my knowledge, the majority (with only a few exceptions i.e. where they were in the middle of a fork) of end houses that faced the road had the kitchen & end bedroom windows on the side instead of the back. The other end was solid as per ours.

To his end, where neccessary, the blocks were "mirrored" so that the kitchens looked out onto the road.

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To my knowledge, the majority (with only a few exceptions i.e. where they were in the middle of a fork) of end houses that faced the road had the kitchen & end bedroom windows on the side instead of the back. The other end was solid as per ours.

To his end, where neccessary, the blocks were "mirrored" so that the kitchens looked out onto the road.

Thanks Markbaby, that had not occured to me before as I have never actually been in any of the houses on Leighton Road but they must be mirrored as from the front that white fencing in front of the "back door" (utility room entrance) is on the opposite side, so it is only the end of block with kitchen exposed that has the windows on the end. My grandads old house on Morland Road, about 5 rows down the hill in front of you (no.3) would have had an identical internal layout. In my earlier black and white pictures, the house rear views are numbers 5, 3. and 1 Morland Road (left to right) and the house fronts are numbers 11, 13 and 15 Morland Road, all taken from the garden of number 3.

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Continuing the tour we are now at the Herdings shops at the top of the hill.

This row of shops comprises, nearest the camera on the right is an S&E Co-op. Then there is Hughes News, a newsagents / tobacconists / sweet shop and then 3 other shops which were, in an order I can't remember, a greengrocers / florists, a butchers and a ladies hairdressers. I may be a bit wrong on this as I often confuse these shops with a similar but longer row at Gleadless Townend on Gleadless Road.

Beyond the last shop the footpath continues to the Raeburn tower blocks and behind those maisonettes on the lefy is the old youth club.

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Just beyond the shops we reach the top of the hill with a road access, Raeburn Place, up from Raeburn Road from near the other bus stop for the number 28 bus.

On the top of the hill are these 13 storey tower blocks built in the late 1950's.

Originally there were 3 of them which had names like Leighton, Morland and Raeburn, the local street names, - although they were all on Raeburn Place.

Being tall buildings on top of a hill they dominated the area for miles around being visible for so far into north Derbyshire that most locals of that county immediately associate those 3 towers with "Sheffield", to them they were "Sheffield" as it was the nearest and most visible bit of Sheffield to them.

In the 1990's the decision was taken to demolish one of the towers which was considered unsafe, so now there were only 2

The remaining 2 towers were fully renovated, given extra security in the form of a fence and given posh if not pretentious new names like Queen Anne's Court and Queen Elizabeth's Court. Presumably this was also a move from rented council flats to privately owned flats.

Today the 2 towers (twin towers???) still stand proud high above the estate visible for miles around.

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