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Manor Road names


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i wonder if there is anyone out there that can tell me how windyhouse lane got its name?

It's named after a nearby farm called Windy House Farm. It must have been an exposed spot, as it was said that on a clear day you could see the towers of Lincoln Cathedral from there.

Oh, and welcome to the Forum!

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It's named after a nearby farm called Windy House Farm. It must have been an exposed spot, as it was said that on a clear day you could see the towers of Lincoln Cathedral from there.

Oh, and welcome to the Forum!

Windy House is marked on old maps and its location would be to the manor top side of the current Windy House Lane. Presumably this would have been the farm house of Windy House Farm and it would most likely have been demolished in the 1930's prior to the building of that part of the Manor estate near the top of with all those concentric circular (actually oval) roads.

More interestingly and in more recent times,

Why did Windy House Lane get bollarded off from City Road? At one time you could go straight along Eastern Avenue from the Arbourthorne, straight across City and up Windy House Lane onto the Manor, but not any more, now you have to go via either Manor Top or Wulfric Road. Why?

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Windy House is marked on old maps and its location would be to the manor top side of the current Windy House Lane. Presumably this would have been the farm house of Windy House Farm and it would most likely have been demolished in the 1930's prior to the building of that part of the Manor estate near the top of with all those concentric circular (actually oval) roads.

More interestingly and in more recent times,

Why did Windy House Lane get bollarded off from City Road? At one time you could go straight along Eastern Avenue from the Arbourthorne, straight across City and up Windy House Lane onto the Manor, but not any more, now you have to go via either Manor Top or Wulfric Road. Why?

Could it be something to do with joy riders and the like, blocking off an escape route etc or just Sheffield planners thought it was a good idea when they had some spare bollards.

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Could it be something to do with joy riders and the like, blocking off an escape route etc or just Sheffield planners thought it was a good idea when they had some spare bollards.

Was it some spare bollards, - or just a load of bollards!!

Could be the joy riders I suppose but you can still get a motorbike through the gaps. However, when the road was bollarded the pavement of City Road was extended across the end of Windy House Lane to make it continuous.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I wonder if there is anyone out there that can tell me how Windyhouse lane got its name?

If Windyhouse Lane is an unusual name, then what about Fairleigh, the road that seems to be at the centre of all those concetric circular roads that cross Prince of Wales Road at the top of the Manor?

How did Fairleigh get its name?

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  • 8 months later...

Windy House is marked on old maps and its location would be to the manor top side of the current Windy House Lane. Presumably this would have been the farm house of Windy House Farm and it would most likely have been demolished in the 1930's prior to the building of that part of the Manor estate near the top of with all those concentric circular (actually oval) roads.

More interestingly and in more recent times,

Why did Windy House Lane get bollarded off from City Road? At one time you could go straight along Eastern Avenue from the Arbourthorne, straight across City and up Windy House Lane onto the Manor, but not any more, now you have to go via either Manor Top or Wulfric Road. Why?

No sign of Windy House as expected. Walking around this area of the Manor with a camera and a mobile phone looking for Windyhouse relics is not the safest of things to do these days.

I now think the blocking off of the road from City Road may have something to do with the Supertram (mid 1990's?) but this doesn't seem to have applied to other roads like Wulfric.

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Waterside Echo

No sign of Windy House as expected. Walking around this area of the Manor with a camera and a mobile phone looking for Windyhouse relics is not the safest of things to do these days.

I now think the blocking off of the road from City Road may have something to do with the Supertram (mid 1990's?) but this doesn't seem to have applied to other roads like Wulfric.

I seem to remember reading in `The Star`that the junction of Eastern Avenue/Windyhouse Lane was an accident blackspot. It was used as a short cut to avoid Manor Top.

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I seem to remember reading in `The Star`that the junction of Eastern Avenue/Windyhouse Lane was an accident blackspot. It was used as a short cut to avoid Manor Top.

I can't remember many accidents taking place at that location but it certainly was the quickest way to get from the Arbouthorne to Prince of Wales Road down to Darnall and Attercliffe without having to go all the way to Manor Top.

Perhaps the reason they left Wulfric Road open was because there is no other road directly opposite it on the Arbourthorne side of City of City Road, - just a row of shops.

Now there's an interesting street name, Wulfric

It sounds like its Scandinavian / Danish / Viking / Saxon, or a norse type God. Certainly it is a forname, and one which predates the Norman conquest.

Is Wulfric someone who played an important part in the history of this area in the post Roman pre Norman (255AD - 1066AD) period?

Was he perhaps a warrior involved in the conflict in the 800 - 900 AD years when Sheffield was on the Northumberland / Mercia border in the time of Egbert (hence the name of a local school) or was he just into the Norman era and stood up against them like Waltheof (hence the name of another local school, even more local to this part of town).

So over to the experts, How did Wulfric Road get its name? Is it named after someone called Wulfric? If so who was he and what did he do?

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It's named after the last Saxon lord of the Manor of Eckington in the time of Ethelred, who rejoiced in the name of Wulfric Spott. Apparently there's a group of street names on the Manor connected with the history of Eckinngton. Anyone know what the rest might be?

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It's named after the last Saxon lord of the Manor of Eckington in the time of Ethelred, who rejoiced in the name of Wulfric Spott. Apparently there's a group of street names on the Manor connected with the history of Eckinngton. Anyone know what the rest might be?

Eckington would have been a long way beyond Sheffield at that time, and even today it is JUST beyond our city limits.

However, thanks for the info Bayleaf, I did suspect it was aname from that era of history

Wulfric Spott

Could the other road be Spotswood Road?

I'll keep a look out for suitable candidates for other related street names.

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Eckington would have been a long way beyond Sheffield at that time, and even today it is JUST beyond our city limits.

However, thanks for the info Bayleaf, I did suspect it was aname from that era of history

Wulfric Spott

Could the other road be Spotswood Road?

I'll keep a look out for suitable candidates for other related street names.

I think one will be Fitzhubert (Ralph)

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Not Spotswood, named after James Spotswood, a trustee of Gleadless Independent Chapel, built in the 1820's.

However, vox is spot on (sorry!) . Fitzhubert Road is after the first Norman lord of Eckington Manor in 1086.

I've found some more,

Riddings Close is after an old Mosborough field name, part of Eckington Manor.

Motehall is after another Eckington field name, from 1649 called Mote (or Moote) Hall Yard.

Noehill is after an old cottage in Mosborough, Noehill House, part of the Eckington estate.

Hastilar is a position mentioned in the old Eckington Court Rolls. A hastilar (or hastler) was a mediaeval letter carrier or messenger, usually taking messages from the Court to outlying areas.

One that sounds as if it might be one is Raynold Road, but Peter Harvey missed it out altogether!

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Not Spotswood, named after James Spotswood, a trustee of Gleadless Independent Chapel, built in the 1820's.

However, vox is spot on (sorry!) . Fitzhubert Road is after the first Norman lord of Eckington Manor in 1086.

I've found some more,

Riddings Close is after an old Mosborough field name, part of Eckington Manor.

Motehall is after another Eckington field name, from 1649 called Mote (or Moote) Hall Yard.

Noehill is after an old cottage in Mosborough, Noehill House, part of the Eckington estate.

Hastilar is a position mentioned in the old Eckington Court Rolls. A hastilar (or hastler) was a mediaeval letter carrier or messenger, usually taking messages from the Court to outlying areas.

One that sounds as if it might be one is Raynold Road, but Peter Harvey missed it out altogether!

Thanks Bayleaf, there's certainly a lot of history just in the street names on the Manor.

Hastilar road currently exists as Hastilar Road and Hastilar Road South for some reason.

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But it doesn't explain why they were all named for historic places and people in Eckington!

I though you had already answered that one in post #10 Bayleaf

With Wulfric Spott being the Lord of Eckington

Presumably he also had land or some sort of stake in the Manor area.

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If Windyhouse Lane is an unusual name, then what about Fairleigh, the road that seems to be at the centre of all those concetric circular roads that cross Prince of Wales Road at the top of the Manor?

How did Fairleigh get its name?

How about raising this question about manor road names agin, I seemed to have overlooked this one

Fairleigh

The short road holds a central position in the centre of the concentric Manor roads, but how did it get its unusual name?

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Waterside Echo

How about raising this question about manor road names agin, I seemed to have overlooked this one

Fairleigh

The short road holds a central position in the centre of the concentric Manor roads, but how did it get its unusual name?

I would have thought it was obvious, because its fairly close to Manor Top.

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I would have thought it was obvious, because its fairly close to Manor Top.

BOOM BOOM! lol

Actually the Oracle (aka Peter Harvey). couldn't find an origin for the name, only that it was approved in 1924.

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Not Spotswood, named after James Spotswood, a trustee of Gleadless Independent Chapel, built in the 1820's.

However, vox is spot on (sorry!) . Fitzhubert Road is after the first Norman lord of Eckington Manor in 1086.

I've found some more,

Riddings Close is after an old Mosborough field name, part of Eckington Manor.

Motehall is after another Eckington field name, from 1649 called Mote (or Moote) Hall Yard.

Noehill is after an old cottage in Mosborough, Noehill House, part of the Eckington estate.

Hastilar is a position mentioned in the old Eckington Court Rolls. A hastilar (or hastler) was a mediaeval letter carrier or messenger, usually taking messages from the Court to outlying areas.

One that sounds as if it might be one is Raynold Road, but Peter Harvey missed it out altogether!

Whilst accepting that these roads are pretty surely named for their Eckington associations I have to ask myself (and obviously you lot) to wonder then:

Why such diverse namesakes as

A field, a cottage, a lord, an occupation etc.

It would make more sense if they were all people, or all place names and so on.

Also I ask you to muse upon:

Why only some of the roads and not all of them.

Other estates with themed road names seem to be named reasonably consistently.

Like Hackenthorpe, and I think Shiregreen, named mainly for their historic local associations.

The Flower estate obviously themed as it's name suggests.

Just food for thought.

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Whilst accepting that these roads are pretty surely named for their Eckington associations I have to ask myself (and obviously you lot) to wonder then:

Why such diverse namesakes as

A field, a cottage, a lord, an occupation etc.

It would make more sense if they were all people, or all place names and so on.

Also I ask you to muse upon:

Why only some of the roads and not all of them.

Other estates with themed road names seem to be named reasonably consistently.

Like Hackenthorpe, and I think Shiregreen, named mainly for their historic local associations.

The Flower estate obviously themed as it's name suggests.

Just food for thought.

What they have in common is they all appear in the Court Rolls for Eckington, but I agree it seems pretty arbitrary. If they wanted a historic theme they could have culled names from the Sheffield Manor Court Rolls which might have been more appropriate given their location.

There must be some underlying link somewhere. Perhaps the Council officer concerned was an amateur historian from Eckington who wanted to preserve some names. But why 'hastilar'? as you say it's not a placename or a person. It probably appears in Rolls from most manors.

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I would have thought it was obvious, because its fairly close to Manor Top.

Due to its location in the "bulls eye" of all those circular roads which make up the upper manor area it is also "fairly" close to just about anywhere on this estate.

To take your joke a bit further, why just call the street "Fairleigh", they could have called it "Fairleigh Close" lol

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Due to its location in the "bulls eye" of all those circular roads which make up the upper manor area it is also "fairly" close to just about anywhere on this estate.

To take your joke a bit further, why just call the street "Fairleigh", they could have called it "Fairleigh Close" lol

--- and then build another of these on it. lol

This ones in the center of Basegreen.

(Needs to go in the closed pubs section)

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--- and then build another of these on it. lol

This ones in the center of Basegreen.

(Needs to go in the closed pubs section)

Think I beat you to it on this one vox,

Pub is still open, even used my own photo as it is the pub where Sheffield Steam Club hold their monthly meetings

Centre Spot

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Due to its location in the "bulls eye" of all those circular roads which make up the upper manor area it is also "fairly" close to just about anywhere on this estate.

To take your joke a bit further, why just call the street "Fairleigh", they could have called it "Fairleigh Close" lol

--- and then build another of these on it. lol

This ones in the center of Basegreen.

(Needs to go in the closed pubs section)

Edit - Duplicated!! How did I do that??

=================

DAVE - That's a bit of a problem with Closed Pubs at the moment. They often close for a while then change hands and open again while someone else has a go.

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