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dunsbyowl1867

Pitsmoor

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Next up 'Kashmir House' - as is, but what was it called it originally?

Hello,

Its early Victorian (don't know the original name) but for some years, it was a Dr. Barnardo's Home. In 1948, the house

became the Vicarage for Holy Trinity Church on Nursery Street. The Church's previous vicarage had been on Rock Street and

was destroyed during the first night of the Blitz. Don't know if Holy Trinity kept the house as a vicarge or used it for some

other purpose. The Church itself eventually closed and the building sold to another Christian denomination.

Regards

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Another early postcard ? Is this looking down towards Firvale possibly just below the Sportsman. Perhaps that is the stone wall of Norbury House on the left?

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(Moved this here from a separate thread. Bayleaf)

This extract is from "A Descriptive Catalogue of Early Charters relating to lands in & near Sheffield" compiled by T Walter Hall.

PITSMOOR.

1315 Sunday next after the feast of the decollation of Saint John the Baptist (29th August).

Charter , dated at Scheffeud, confirming a grant from Simon Haldan of Scheffeud to Ralph Page del Orepittes and Alice his wife and their heirs and assigns, of four places of land lying separate in the field del Orepittes, of which one place lay between land of Richard del Orepittes, on both sides, and another place lay between land of the aforesaid Richard, on both sides, and a third place lay between land of Sir Thomas de Furnivall and land of Adam Robot and the fourth place lay between land of the said Adam Robot and land of William son of Tille;

to hold the same unto the aforesaid Ralph and Alice and their heirs or assigns, freely etc, with all appurtenances etc, doing thenceforth yearly, for the chief lord of the fee, services owing and accustomed, warranty of title.

Witnesses: Thomas de Bosco of Scheffeud, Lambert Tynctor of the same place, Adam del Kere, Wylliam son of Tylle del Orepittes and William clerk of Scheffeud.

This and the three following charters relate to plots of unfenced land lying in the common field of le Orepittes in the parish of Sheffield and lordship of Hallamshire; beyond this general description there is nothing in the charters to define the exact position of the common field within the parish.

As will be explained later, the district now known as Pitsmoor in the township of Brightside Byerlow and parish of Sheffield, includes the site of le Orepittes of the 14th century; and it seems worth while to put on record the available evidence in support of this statement.

The story of le Orepittes, as now known, begins with the charter of 1315 above abstracted; but from its contents there is evidence that the name originated long before 1315.

By this charter, Simon Haldan of Sheffield granted to Ralph Page del Orepittes four places of land, lying separate in the field del Orepittes; from this it can be gathered, that early in the 14th century le Orepittes was one of the common fields of the manor of Sheffield, which the lord let to his tenants, in return for services due to him according to the custom of the manor.

It therefore follows, that if the lord’s tenants were cultivating their places or plots of land in the common field del Orepittes, in accordance with the ordinary course of husbandry, the getting of iron ore, which gave the name to the field, must have occurred long before 1315.

From charters of de Luvetot and de Busli, it is known that shortly after 1161, the monks of Kirkstede were getting and smelting iron ore on the hillside known as Thundercliffe, in that part of the ancient parish of Ecclesfield which adjoins the parish of Sheffield on the north; and the district, now known as Pitsmoor, is within two miles of the ancient workings on Thundercliffe.

The way in which the monks got and smelted the ore has been well described by the late Mr W. E. Evers, who lived for many years at jumble Hole Cottage on Thundercliffe and was well acquainted with the underground workings, which he had often found and examined near his cottage; these included tunnels shafts and bell- pits, all of which have long since been filled up and to some extent preserved.

He described the bell-pits as small round holes at the surface, widening as they descended, till the ironstone was reached not many feet below. When the ironstone at the bottom of the pit had been got, it was, in the early days, drawn to the surface by hand, a rope being passed through a hole at the top on to a handled roller fixed above the pit; and another bell-pit was sunk just far enough away to avoid subsidence of the surface.

The mining and smelting of ironstone by the monks would be watched with the greatest interest, not only by the lord of the manor and his servants but also by the people who lived within reach of Thundercliffe.

The seam of iron ore would be followed into adjoining lands, wherever the ore could be traced; and it is now certain that it was found on the hillside known as Pitsmoor and was got either by the monks or by their imitators, at the end of the 12th or the beginning of the 13th century, which gave rise to the name le Orepittes.

From records of the Furnival family, evidence can be gathered to prove that Pitsmoor was the site of le Orepittes.

Two places adjoining Pitsmoor exist at the present time which supply proof of this, namely Osgathorpe and Skinnerthorpe. An inquest held on the death of Thomas de Furnival in 1366, refers to a place called Erputes as a member of Sheffield Castle;

and another inquest held on the death of his widow ]oan in 1395, includes amongst her lands and tenements Osgerthorp, Orpyttes and Skynerthorp, as parcel of the manor of Shefheld.

Orpyttes of this inquest is without doubt the Pitsmoor of to-day, which adjoins both Osgathorpe and Skinnerthorpe.

In a deed of 1594 there is reference to a lane leading from Brighouses towards Orepittes; and in another of 1620 Hugh Rawson is described as of Orepittes in the parish of Sheffield tanner and Hunter in his Familia: Minorum Gentium, volume iv, page 1176 refers to Hugh Rawson of Nor— wood, Sheffield, which adjoins or is part of the district now known as Pitsmoor.

In the Survey of the Manor of Sheffield, made in 1637 by ]ohn Harrison for the earl of Arundell and Surrey, the name Orepittes does not occur; but Pitts moore is often referred to and " a common called Pitts more " is twice mentioned.

From these records we can gather that le Orepittes of the 14th century was the Pitts more of Harrison’s survey; and the change, which would be gradual, was taking place in the 17th century.

Today the ancient name le Orepittes has entirely disappeared and Pitsmoor has taken its place. Much of the land in Brightside Byerlow was enclosed at a very early date; but “ the common of Pitts more," once le Orepittes, remained an open moor or common until 1788, when it was enclosed under an Act of 28 George III, together with much detached waste land of the manor, amounting in all to about 150 acres.

In The Fairbank Collection at the Sheffield City Library there is a draft of the map made for the Award of the Commissioners appointed by the Enclosure Act of 1788, where the common is shown as extending from the point where Pitsmoor Road joins Barnsley Road to Crabtree Bank and perhaps Page Hall.

This house, which yet stands, was built by Thomas Broadbent in 1773 on land described in an early title deed, as Page Greave; and in the charter of 1315 above abstracted, Simon Haldan granted the four places of land in the Held del Orepittes to Ralph Page, del Orepittes.

(1371) Thursday next after the feast of Saint Michael the archangel (29th September) in the 45th year of Edward III.

Quitclaim , dated at Orepittes, by Alan Lambard chaplain of Sheffeld to Henry de Brigge his heirs or assigns, of all his right and claim in that half of an oxgang, with its appurtenances, in le Orepittes in the parish of Sheffeld, which then formerly was of Lambert ...... of Sheffeld.

Witnesses: William del ..... , Peter del Car, Robert Reson, Thomas Lyly and William Thomson.

(1375—6) February 11th in the 50th year of Edward III.

Charter , dated at Orepittes, confirming a grant from Thomas Fysh [er] of Roderam to John Mounteney lord of Shircliife, of the reversion to all lands and tenements, with all buildings and their appurtenances, which to him [Thomas] ought to descend by right of inheritance, after the decease of Albreda his mother, in le Orepittes, within the lordship of Hallumshire;

to hold to the aforesaid john his heirs and assigns, freely etc, of the chief lord of the fee, by services owing and accustomed, warranty of title. Witnesses: William de Birlay, William del Kerre, Robert de Osgerthorpe and john de Cresewik.

(1376) Tuesday the 13th May in the 50th year of Edward III.

Charter , dated at Orpittes, confirming a grant from Thomas son of Robert Rayson to John de Mounteney lord of Shirklif, of a messuage with a toft and croft, with the appurtenances in le Orpittes, which he had from the gift and feoffment of William atte Well; to hold to the aforesaid John his heirs and assigns, freely etc, of the chief lords of that fee, by services thenceforth owing and of right accustomed, warranty of title.

Witnesses: William in le Ker, Robert de Osgerthorpe, William del Coumb, Robert Michall and John Hally chaplain

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Nice work; you won that bid then ? I was bidding but "floor-tilers-knee" rendered me incapable of locomotion !

(Difference between movement and locomotion is ... ?)

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Nice work; you won that bid then ? I was bidding but "floor-tilers-knee" rendered me incapable of locomotion !

(Difference between movement and locomotion is ... ?)

Must have been a different one, mine was the only bid, that's why I didn't post to say I was in.

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150 Years ago Pitsmoor was one of 'the' places to live.

Is this place also known as Pye Bank? And, is Pye Bank the name of an area as well as a road?

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Hello,

Its early Victorian (don't know the original name) but for some years, it was a Dr. Barnardo's Home. In 1948, the house

became the Vicarage for Holy Trinity Church on Nursery Street. The Church's previous vicarage had been on Rock Street and

was destroyed during the first night of the Blitz. Don't know if Holy Trinity kept the house as a vicarge or used it for some

other purpose. The Church itself eventually closed and the building sold to another Christian denomination.

Regards

Hi, My father born 1918 attended school here, he was under the care of Dr Barnardo's, this was about 1925, he was here with his brother and sister until they were sent to a foster home in Wincobank, Dad was finally taken by his paternal Grandfather, but the other two sibs were adopted.

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Is this place also known as Pye Bank? And, is Pye Bank the name of an area as well as a road?

The area is more commonly called Woodside, rather than Pye Bank, tho most of the public buildings in the area (the school, former pub, hostel) are or were all called Pye Bank [whatever].

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Nice work matey, - I often wondered what that place was. Here are a couple of maps...but I can't work out which building it is on these.

This is the school that Charlie Peace is reputed to have attended.

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Is this place also known as Pye Bank? And, is Pye Bank the name of an area as well as a road?

When I first came to Sheffield in 1993 I moved into a Maisonette on Pye Bank Road - no longer there now, was demolished about 4yrs ago now. This was classed as Woodside by the council. I then moved to Fox Street - which again came under the name Woodside - also demolished now.

My children used to go to Christchurch and what lovely pics you have on here of it (inc the post card version). I was wondering if the owners of the pics would mind sending me a copy (a lil bigger in size if that is possible) via email please as I would love to give my children a lil memento of some happy times they spent there. My email address is XXXXXXXXXX They were also baptised there in 1997 by Rev Jan Hardy.

Thanking you in advance

=========================================

Please PM babybluejojo for Email address

Steve

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I did a bit of research on these houses a couple of years back

here they are 1881,

1881 census

Household:

Dwelling: 253 Pitsmoor Rd

Census Place: Brightside Bierlow, York, England

Source: FHL Film 1342126 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 4660 Folio 4 Page 1

Marr Age Sex Birthplace

Henry Joeph. WILSON M 47 M Radford, Nottingham, England

Rel: Head

Occ: Manftr Viz Smelter & Refiner Of Gold & Silver

Charlotte C. WILSON M 47 F Scotland

Rel: Wife

Cecil Hy. WILSON U 18 M Mansfield, Nottingham, England

Rel: Son

Occ: Undergraduate Of London Univerty Assistant To Analytical Chemist

Helen M. WILSON U 16 F Woodhouse Mansfield, Nottingham, England

Rel: Daur

Occ: Scholar

Alexander C. WILSON U 14 M Woodhouse Mansfield, Nottingham, England

Rel: Son

Occ: Scholar

Oliver C. WILSON U 13 M Rotherham, York, England

Rel: Son

Occ: Scholar

Gertrude M. WILSON U 4 F Sheffield, York, England

Rel: Daur

Occ: Scholar

Charles C. NEWSHAM U 9 M Bengal, India

Rel: Nephew

Occ: Scholar

Sarah A. CROOKES U 22 F Arksey Bentley, York, England

Rel: Serv

Occ: Nurse Domestic Servant

Emily FULLILOVE U 26 F Ecclesfield, York, England

Rel: Serv

Occ: Cook Domestic Servant

Emily WHITHAM U 19 F Sheffield, York, England

Rel: Serv

Occ: Housemaid Domestic Servant

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And this family are the Sheffield Smelting Co Family - HJ Wilson managed the business and became MP for Holmfirth in 1885.

http://www.picturesheffield.com/cgi-bin/pi...ff.refno=s08272

His son Oliver Charles Wilson also later managed the business was Lord Mayor of Sheffield in 1914.

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Hello,

Now then, as I'm not a Sheffield lad I think I could do with a bit of educating! One of my ancestors was said to live in Woodside, Pitsmoor. This was sort of around 1830-1861. I was wondering what quality and class of homes would have been like in Woodside at this point.

Thanks,

JP

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Hello,

Now then, as I'm not a Sheffield lad I think I could do with a bit of educating! One of my ancestors was said to live in Woodside, Pitsmoor. This was sort of around 1830-1861. I was wondering what quality and class of homes would have been like in Woodside at this point.

Thanks,

JP

Hi JSP

I would have thought if it was your Fisher relatives and they were fairly well off they would have lived in one of the large Georgian houses still standing on Pitsmoor Road a few of which are pictured in this thread - I think I have more of others. You may be able to pinpoint on one of the census returns.

best wishes

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Hi JSP

I would have thought if it was your Fisher relatives and they were fairly well off they would have lived in one of the large Georgian houses still standing on Pitsmoor Road a few of which are pictured in this thread - I think I have more of others. You may be able to pinpoint on one of the census returns.

best wishes

My thoughts exactly, thats why I was a little surprised when I read about Woodside estate. Thanks for the help,

JP

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1861 census: (unfortunately also the year of his death) lived at 123 Pitsmoor. (doesn't mention Woodside in the census however all other sources such as directorys say Woodside)

Where should I look to find info about this residence?

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In White's 1857: Fisher Mr. Wm., 123 Pitsmoor

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1861 census: (unfortunately also the year of his death) lived at 123 Pitsmoor. (doesn't mention Woodside in the census however all other sources such as directorys say Woodside)

Where should I look to find info about this residence?

Difficult to say then JSP - those photos are of houses around numbers 245-259. I am not sure if that is modern numbering or dates from the early - mid 19th C. If 123 Pitsmoor was on Pitsmoor Road it may be further back down towards Bridgehouses and the crossing over the River Don. This seems to be Pye Bank on earlier maps.

Can you see the occupations of other neighbours to get of sense of the class of housing?

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thanks for looking :) I never have straightforward questions haha

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Hmm,, Some quite "high up" people on the census sheet. Namely; Mr Haywood - Magistrate; Mr Jeffcock (rings a bell) Also everyone appears to have servants.

If you are interested I have attached an image of the census.

Thanks,

JP

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thanks for looking :) I never have straightforward questions haha

Looking at the occupations some of the neighbours they look fairly working class I think.

Whites 1857

Cooper Wm., tanner; h 125 Pitsmoor

Lockwood Chas., merchant; h 127 Pitsmoor

Porter Thos., grocer; h 129 Pitsmoor

Dixon Joseph Hoult, gold and silver refiner, Mowbray st; h 133 Pitsmoor

Bay Horse, J. Wright,151 Pitsmoor

Beatson Wm., 124 Pitsmoor, Beerhouse

Owen John, 135 Pitsmoor, Maltster

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then there's this one. Not quite so working class it seems.

Wall George, gent., 137 Pitsmoor

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There is always the possibility the houses at the top end were renumbered when the whole road became Pistmoor Road ie between 1861-1881.

In 1881 the Jeffcocks are at no 249 which is pictured above they may have moved but the renumbering seems more likely

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Registration District of: Sheffied

Year : 1866

Birth in the Sub-district of: Brightside

in the : County of York

Entry No. 133

When & where born : Eleventh August 1866

139 Pitsmoor

Name, if any : James Moreton

Sex : Boy

Name & Surname of father : James MARCHINTON

Name & Maiden Surname of Mother : Anna Elizabeth MARCHINTON

formerly MAKIN

Rank or Profession of Father : Steel Manufacturer

Signature, Description & Residence of Informant : James Marchinton

Father

139 Pitsmoor, Brightside, Bierlow

When Registered : Twenty first September 1866

Signature of Registrar : George Sykes

Baptismal Name if added after Registration of Birth :

Date Certified "True Copy" : 16 November 2000

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There is always the possibility the houses at the top end were renumbered when the whole road became Pistmoor Road ie between 1861-1881.

In 1881 the Jeffcocks are at no 249 which is pictured above they may have moved but the renumbering seems more likely

Pitsmoor Road was previously called Pye Bank. Now I'm completely confused

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