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DaveH

Mystery Location

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A certain county town then?

Yes, It is a town in Yorkshire, pub name required.

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Rose and Crown would be the name

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Any thoughts? Not in the City Centre.

This building replaced one built for the same purpose in 1816. I am curious to know what that one looked like.

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Any thoughts? Not in the City Centre.

This building replaced one built for the same purpose in 1816. I am curious to know what that one looked like.

United Methodist Sunday School, Allen Street?

I've no idea what the previous one looked like.

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It must be the replacement for the oldest Sunday School in Sheffield, in Allen Street:

In 1899:

"... the new premises, when completed, will afford a home for a work which has been carried on on the same site for over 80 years, and which was established upwards of 100 years ago, and was the first Sunday school to be opened in Sheffield.

At first it was undenominational, although its establishment was largely due to the work of the Rev. A. Kilham, who was appointed minister of the Sheffield circuit by the first Methodist New Connexion Conference held at Leeds in 1797, but afterwards, the officers and teachers belonging to other denominations, who helped the school, gradually left it upon the building of schools directly connected with their own churches, and it eventually became the school belonging to the Methodist New Connexion Chapel in Scotland street. The first building was in Pea Croft, and afterwards larger rooms were taken in Sycamore street.

The Allen street building was erected in 1816, and work was carried on there for upwards of 80 years. More than 20 years ago the dilapidated state of the building caused the members to think of erecting a new school, and an effort was begun in 1892, which it was hoped would be succesfully completed by 1897, when the schools jubilee was celebrated. This was not possible, however,and it was only yesterday that the foundation stones of the new building were laid.

The old school has been pulled down, and the new building, now rising slowly on the same site, is expected to cost £3500. For the purposes of obtaining an uninterrupted light, two cottages in Blue Boy street have been purchased at a cost of £250. The amount of £3000 has already been raised, and it is earnestly hoped that when the new school is opened it will be clear of debt."

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Is this it ? (New one, showing the Stone).

http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s05111&pos=2&action=zoom&id=8545

Any thoughts? Not in the City Centre.

This building replaced one built for the same purpose in 1816. I am curious to know what that one looked like.

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Here it nearly is http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12946&pos=3&action=zoom&id=15846

1937

Is this it ?

http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s05111&pos=2&action=zoom&id=8545

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It is bigger closer to. (September 1937, new one).

http://www.picturesh...n=zoom&id=21903

http://www.picturesh...n=zoom&id=22047

Edited by SteveHB
links repaired

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Gotcha ! The new one, that is.

http://www.picturesh...n=zoom&id=36046

Edited by SteveHB
link repaired

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Nice to know the kids had somewhere to go at lunchtime !

John Westbrook, Acadamies, Seminaries and Public Schools, 36 Pea Croft

William Hoole, Old Barrell, 34 Pea Croft

Joseph Swinden, Old Star, 37 Pea Croft

Robert Winter, Paul Pry, 63 Pea Croft

Edward Whiteley, Ball, 8 Pea Croft

John Hall, Brewers, retail, 86 Pea Croft

William Jepson, Gooseberry Inn, Pea Croft

all the above 1828-9, coutesy of SheffieldRecordsOnline.org

... The first building was in Pea Croft, and afterwards larger rooms were taken in Sycamore street.

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These links just take me to blank pages. ??

Are they working on other peoples machines ?

Yes they are now vox.

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Yes they are now vox.

Thank you

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All correct of course :)

A sorry sight now, perhaps not long for this world -

14 Nov 1899 (Independent)

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http://www.picturesheffield.s19505

Have you zoomed into the two little lads sat on the spike railings? and not a Health & Safety man in sight.

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Small Window in a wall, the building that was behind the wall has gone, just a bit of wall left.

2 part mystery, where is it and did the small window have a purpose.

I am sure Steve will get the location

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That looks like a Cellar chute, theres quite a few on Gleadless Road going to Heeley Green.

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That looks like a Cellar chute, theres quite a few on Gleadless Road going to Heeley Green.

In the picture it has been very neatly bricked up.

Stuart indicates it was a "window" while tozzin calls it a "chute".

To me a window would have been glazed, - it is to see through and let light through, - but to block droughts and heat loss. A "hole in the wall" would be a "hatch", - as in a serving hatch between a kitchen and a dining room. A "chute" implies that there would be a vertical drop on the other side for the purposes of delivery (like a coal chute into a cellar) which tozzin clearly indicates in his description.

So is it (was it before being bricked up) a window, a hatch or a chute?

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In the picture it has been very neatly bricked up.

Stuart indicates it was a "window" while tozzin calls it a "chute".

To me a window would have been glazed, - it is to see through and let light through, - but to block droughts and heat loss. A "hole in the wall" would be a "hatch", - as in a serving hatch between a kitchen and a dining room. A "chute" implies that there would be a vertical drop on the other side for the purposes of delivery (like a coal chute into a cellar) which tozzin clearly indicates in his description.

So is it (was it before being bricked up) a window, a hatch or a chute?

I say its a window because it looks like a window, yes Dave a window should have Glass.

Whatever its former use the old boundary wall still exists around a new building, I suppose the "opening" was bricked up when the new building was erected.

It could be a chute as Tozzin suggests, I had not thought about that, or would a coal chute have been lower?

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I say its a window because it looks like a window, yes Dave a window should have Glass.

Whatever its former use the old boundary wall still exists around a new building, I suppose the "opening" was bricked up when the new building was erected.

It could be a chute as Tozzin suggests, I had not thought about that, or would a coal chute have been lower?

Yes a coal chute, or a chute for delivering barrels into a beer cellar would be much lower, at pavement level in fact.

I was rather thinking more, due to its height on the wall, its size and shape that it may be some sort of serving / reception / ticket hatch.

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Yes a coal chute, or a chute for delivering barrels into a beer cellar would be much lower, at pavement level in fact.

I was rather thinking more, due to its height on the wall, its size and shape that it may be some sort of serving / reception / ticket hatch.

Not sure what was on the other side of the wall at this point, The building that was there did not cover the entire site, there were grounds so to speak, though they may have been outbuidings.

need to check a map

Edited by DaveH
multiple quote of same post removed

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Not sure what was on the other side of the wall at this point, The building that was there did not cover the entire site, there were grounds so to speak, though they may have been outbuidings.

need to check a map

Just checked the 50's OS map for the area, not sure I know what was behind the wall now, Steve will know I'm sure

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Removed 2 of your quotes Stuart as all 3 were identical

I know I have a habit of repeating myself

I say I know I have a habit of repeating myself

Did I tell you I have a habit of repeating myself

Sorry, it comes from teaching kids and developing their memories.

You tell them once, then you tell them what you have just told them, - then you tell them again.

When learning someones name, after you have been told it you should repeat it 3 times in your immediate conversation with them so that you can remember it.

"This is Stuart"

"Pleased to meet you Stuart, I'm Dave, would you like a drink Stuart? By the way, it's your round Stuart, mines a pint"

That always helps when trying to learn lots of names quickly.

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