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A couple of close ups of the Handsworth Road fountain

Any date for that please ? What are the names on there ?

Welcome back Dobberd lol

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Hi Richard its good to be back :rolleyes: Well from the source of the pictures which is the Public Art in Sheffield this is the info which

artist not known

Jeffcock Memorial Water Trough and Drinking Fountain, after 1902

Handsworth Road

granite

[Listed Building: Grade II]

Location:

Handsworth Road. (A-Z p.101 4H)

Description:

Column in polished granite, with small basin for drinking fountain, together with large water trough in white granite. The surface of the column has been inscribed with simple decorative patterns.

Inscriptions:

On the pink polished granite column within the inscribed patterns: JEFFCOCK / MEMORIAL // M.J. / MAY 20. 1883. // T.D.J. / SEPT 14. 18?? // T.W.J. / AUGUST 3. 1900.

Commission:

not known

Comment:

The Jeffcocks were a large and prominent local family whose members have been recorded in the area since 1351. The most notable member of the family was William Jeffcock, who was born in Handsworth in 1800 and, in 1843, became the very first Mayor of Sheffield.

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Pc Infield

This is the drinking fountain in High Hazels Park.It is on the 1903 OS map,but hasn't worked for years.The shield on the front is blank,but I wonder if it has a Jeffcock connection with being in the grounds of their ancestral home.

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From Pawson & Brailsford's Illustrated Guide to Sheffield & Neighbourhood, 1862:-

Drinking Fountains

A number of gentlemen have munificently come forward to erect drinking fountains for the use of the town.

There is one in the Wicker, at the entrance to the Midland Railway Station, which is very handsome, and was built by Mr. J. H. Sales, coal merchant,at a cost of about £200.

The Town Trustees have erected one in front of the Town Hall in Castle Street.

There is one within the Free Library building, given by Mr. Alderman Fisher.

There is one at the head of Sheffield-moor, erected by Mr John Brown, of the Atlas Iron & Steel Works.

There is one at the junction of Shalesmoor and Gibraltar Street, erected by Mr Nadin, herbalist, of Shalesmoor...

The teachers and friends of the Redhill Sunday Schools have erected a fountain in that locality;

And there is one given by Mr Henry Levy, outside the Parich churchyard, at the top of High Street.

I am currently studying my family history and wondered if anyone knew anymore about the drinking fountain erected by Mr. Alderman Fisher? He is an anscestor of mine and would be very grateful.

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From Pawson & Brailsford's Illustrated Guide to Sheffield & Neighbourhood, 1862:-

Drinking Fountains

A number of gentlemen have munificently come forward to erect drinking fountains for the use of the town.

There is one within the Free Library building, given by Mr. Alderman Fisher.

Here's a coincidence

I came across this whilst trying to find something to help JSP's request.

On the other side of the world an Alderman Fisher talks about the removal of a fountain.

The Sydney Morning Herald

Friday 4 January 1850

WATER FOUNTAIN IN ELIZABETH STREET.

Alderman Fisher stated, that he deemed it his duty to contradict a statement which had been made in a letter to the Herald, by a person calling himself a Citizen of Bourke Ward, as to removal of the water fountain adjoining St James' watchhouse. It was said that this removal had been directed by the Mayor , but such was not the case, as it had been done under the direction of the Water Committee. It had onginally been erected for the accommodation of the Supremo Court establishment and of the watchhouse, and its removal had been assented to by the Judges on the part of the former, and by the Government on the part of the latter.

And another one.

Brainerd, Minnesota

August 18, 2003

Upon roll call, the following members were noted present:

Aldermen Nesheim, Olson, Scheeler, Bevans, Fisher, Koep and Dehen.

Drinking Fountain at Police Station - Approved.

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THYLACINE

Here's a coincidence

I came across this whilst trying to find something to help JSP's request.

On the other side of the world an Alderman Fisher talks about the removal of a fountain.

The Sydney Morning Herald

Friday 4 January 1850

WATER FOUNTAIN IN ELIZABETH STREET.

Alderman Fisher stated, that he deemed it his duty to contradict a statement which had been made in a letter to the Herald, by a person calling himself a Citizen of Bourke Ward, as to removal of the water fountain adjoining St James' watchhouse. It was said that this removal had been directed by the Mayor , but such was not the case, as it had been done under the direction of the Water Committee. It had onginally been erected for the accommodation of the Supremo Court establishment and of the watchhouse, and its removal had been assented to by the Judges on the part of the former, and by the Government on the part of the latter.

And another one.

Brainerd, Minnesota

August 18, 2003

Upon roll call, the following members were noted present:

Aldermen Nesheim, Olson, Scheeler, Bevans, Fisher, Koep and Dehen.

Drinking Fountain at Police Station - Approved.

Here's another one from the other side of the world! Heard on radio this morning, a girls college in North Sydney has just banned . . not the burka . . . but bottled water. They are restoring the schools' disused water fountains and encouraging the girls to bring in a bottle to refil. I think this is a great idea. The water fountain or bubblers as they call them here are a victim of rampant consumerism and the nanny state complex which deemed them unhygenic. Just like the fully recyclable glass milk bottle that once graced our doorsteps. Is this a sign the world coming to it's senses at last? If so, its very commendable but too late, the disease of a money dependant, politically correct system is too far advanced for us to do anything about.

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Here's another one from the other side of the world! Heard on radio this morning, a girls college in North Sydney has just banned . . not the burka . . . but bottled water. They are restoring the schools' disused water fountains and encouraging the girls to bring in a bottle to refil. I think this is a great idea. The water fountain or bubblers as they call them here are a victim of rampant consumerism and the nanny state complex which deemed them unhygenic. Just like the fully recyclable glass milk bottle that once graced our doorsteps. Is this a sign the world coming to it's senses at last? If so, its very commendable but too late, the disease of a money dependant, politically correct system is too far advanced for us to do anything about.

Bottled water - One of the most brilliant marketing cons ever I think. Convincing people that they need to buy something they have already got and paid for.

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hilldweller

This is the drinking fountain in High Hazels Park.It is on the 1903 OS map,but hasn't worked for years.The shield on the front is blank,but I wonder if it has a Jeffcock connection with being in the grounds of their ancestral home.

This drinking fountain looks very like the one featured in the posts about the WW1 funeral cortege and the follow up in Grapevine Magazine by Jason Heath about a similar fountain now residing in Ecclesall Woods. Perhaps they were mass produced and located in several parks in the area. Unfortunately I seem to have mislaid my copies of the magazines

I was hoping to find out from the Parks Dept where the Ecclesall Woods fountain came from in order to locate the setting for the original photo, but my emails are being passed around (and ignored) by various council depts.

The WW1 thread seems to have disappeared into obscurity.

hilldweller.

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Guest SuzyC

Bottled water - One of the most brilliant marketing cons ever I think. Convincing people that they need to buy something they have already got and paid for.

I totally agree with you there, in England. However, for some people it is not an option. We have well water which is not drinkable so have to buy bottled water, in large 5 or 7 ltr bottles, which, when empty, are very useful for other things, like putting in the ground to use for watering veg etc. However, in our municipality of Loja we have about 100 public drinking fountains, 42 of which are located in the town centre. The are used prolifically by everyone (okay some young girls have to have the designer "bottle of water clutched to their hand") but in the main these fountains are very welcome by everyone. How refreshing to rinse your face, mop your brow and, of course, have a swig. They are never less than immaculately clean, and the water is totally cool and fresh. Most are fed by local springs, some by mains water. I suppose that would be taboo by H&S these days in the UK.

We also have communal potable water, where people reuse their plastic bottles by filling them from these taps for ever and a day. Nothing is thrown away here, at least in our area, I have never encountered such thrifty people. Plus there are loads of recycle places, which really work and the community uses them. All I can say is, we don´t have a hosepipe ban despite no rain for 3 months now!!

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Bottled water - One of the most brilliant marketing cons ever I think. Convincing people that they need to buy something they have already got and paid for.

I tend to agree. However when we've been on holiday in some parts of the UK we've found the local water, although perfectly safe, to taste pretty foul compared with what we're used to here in God's own county. On one occasion when self-catering we even bought large bottles of Buxton water to cook with cos the local stuff tasted so bad!

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I totally agree with you there, in England. However, for some people it is not an option. We have well water which is not drinkable ----------------

I was of course referring to here suzi, It's easy to forget that we have members from other countries.

I realise that there are places around the world not so fortunate as us as far as water is concerned.

------------------

In 2009 1,626 million litres of UK-produced bottled water were consumed here in the UK.

(and that's only UK produced water)

--------------

The Independent

Thursday, 17 June 2010

"Coca-Cola was forced to withdraw its Dasani water in 2004 after derision greeted the news that it was little more than treated mains water from Thames Water in Sidcup."

--------------------

The Times on 10 July 2002

Forget the bottle, for purest water turn on the tap

By Anthony Browne, Environment Editor

IT'S purer. It's gentler. It's Yorkshire.

Water wars have broken out as Yorkshire Water and United Utilities have bottled their tap water to launch themselves as brands to take on Perrier, Evian and Highland Spring.

United Utilities is giving away 100,000 bottles of tap water and Yorkshire is urging customers to ask for its water by name in pubs and restaurants. It is also giving away 100,000 empty branded bottles that customers can fill at a tap "so they can always have Yorkshire water with them".

"Yorkshire Water is softer and gentler than some mineral waters, it's purer than bottled waters, and it's 10,000 times cheaper," said the company's spokesman Richard Emmott.

United Utilities said: "We're doing it so that people realise they don't need to buy expensive brands to get an excellent high quality drink."

The battle between tap and cap ignited as the chief inspector of drinking water, Michael Rouse, announced that British tap water had reached almost perfect purity, and urged water companies to take on the bottles.

" People do not need to buy bottled water," he said. "People generally can't taste the difference."

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Guest SuzyC

I was of course referring to here suzi, It's easy to forget that we have members from other countries.

I realise that there are places around the world not so fortunate as us as far as water is concerned.

------------------

In 2009 1,626 million litres of UK-produced bottled water were consumed here in the UK.

(and that's only UK produced water)

--------------

The Independent

Thursday, 17 June 2010

"Coca-Cola was forced to withdraw its Dasani water in 2004 after derision greeted the news that it was little more than treated mains water from Thames Water in Sidcup."

--------------------

The Times on 10 July 2002

Forget the bottle, for purest water turn on the tap

By Anthony Browne, Environment Editor

IT'S purer. It's gentler. It's Yorkshire.

Water wars have broken out as Yorkshire Water and United Utilities have bottled their tap water to launch themselves as brands to take on Perrier, Evian and Highland Spring.

United Utilities is giving away 100,000 bottles of tap water and Yorkshire is urging customers to ask for its water by name in pubs and restaurants. It is also giving away 100,000 empty branded bottles that customers can fill at a tap "so they can always have Yorkshire water with them".

"Yorkshire Water is softer and gentler than some mineral waters, it's purer than bottled waters, and it's 10,000 times cheaper," said the company's spokesman Richard Emmott.

United Utilities said: "We're doing it so that people realise they don't need to buy expensive brands to get an excellent high quality drink."

The battle between tap and cap ignited as the chief inspector of drinking water, Michael Rouse, announced that British tap water had reached almost perfect purity, and urged water companies to take on the bottles.

" People do not need to buy bottled water," he said. "People generally can't taste the difference."

Those figures are incredible Vox. I must say I used to annoy people in Leeds, when we moved there, by saying how superior Sheffield water was to Leeds :P My husband worked for United Utilities for many years at a Victorian water tower in Cheshire which pumped the water from Lake Vernwy to Liverpool. We lived at a house on the site and originally our water came directly from the tower before treatment and it tasted beautiful. In latter years we had to change to treated water (H&S strikes again :( ) and it wasn´t a patch on the pure stuff!!

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SteveHB

Memorial Drinking Fountain,

Meersbrook Park, S8. (now disused)

This fountain was erected

by the members of The

British United Order Of Oddfellows

to perpetuate the memory of

the late

William Westran

one of its founders and

corresponding secretary for

twenty one years, He died while

still in office April 2nd 1889

In his 66th year.

A J & S Eaton. Sc

529 Intake Rd. Sheff

(Sc - sculpture ?)

Grade 2 listed .. www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk

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RichardB

Memorial Drinking Fountain,

Meersbrook Park, S8. (now disused)

The British United Order Of Oddfellows to perpetuate the memory of the late William Westran

one of its founders and corresponding secretary for twenty one years, He died while

still in office April 2nd 1889 In his 66th year.

The British United Order Of Oddfellows (1904) - "Established over 100 years ago"

Branches, nearly 5,000

Adult Members 265,407

Female Members 37,289

Juvenile Members 14,509

Capital £1,046,650

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History dude

Norfolk Park had one of those metal ones near the upper entrance near the lodges. I don't know if it's still there or working though.

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SteveHB

Norfolk Park had one of those metal ones near the upper entrance near the lodges. I don't know if it's still there or working though.

Yes there was one near to what is now the Guildford Av entrance,

I do not remember it but people who do have told me it had metal drinking cups

attached by chains.

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RichardB

Yes there was one near to what is now the Guildford Av entrance,

I do not remember it but people who do have told me it had metal drinking cups

attached by chains.

Try getting that past Elf & Safety !

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SteveHB

Try getting that past Elf & Safety !

Yes I was thinking the same,

especialy if someone had just washed their sweaty feet in it.

lol

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Guest Alanpban

The one on Broad Lane. Unfortunately not working.

Can anyone help on this one....I have passed this many times and have noticed that in times gone by, there was on the base some sort of writing...does any one have a clue as to what it said or was about as it has long since faded from view...Thanks Al..

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Can anyone help on this one....I have passed this many times and have noticed that in times gone by, there was on the base some sort of writing...does any one have a clue as to what it said or was about as it has long since faded from view...Thanks Al..

I think you will find an answer here ..

See post number 06.

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Can anyone help on this one....I have passed this many times and have noticed that in times gone by, there was on the base some sort of writing...does any one have a clue as to what it said or was about as it has long since faded from view...Thanks Al..

Thought I'd seen this before, go Alan

(Darn it, quick-draw Steve's in town ^_^ )

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Guest Alanpban

Thank you so much to you both, the info supplied has scratched an itch of mine that has lasted for many years...such a shame though wouldn't you agree, that nothing has been done to bring back to life a most valuable piece of our city history...again thanks...Al ;-)

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