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dunsbyowl1867

St Michaels Neepsend & Holy Trinity Wicker

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Where were these churches ? I wish I had a map! Steve?

The last time I looked Holy Trinity was still there on Nursery Street-corner of Johnson Street,

Flash Earth

St. Michaels and All Angels stood on the area between Burton Road and Neepsend Lane,

Flash Earth

St Michaels Vicarage and later hall at Vale Road Parkwood Springs

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A more recent photo of Holy Trinity on Nursery Street with Aizlewoods Mill in the background. The church is now a "gospel" type church and seems to be very well attended. Its now called the "New Testament Church Of God"

.

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St Michael's Church, between Vale Rd & Douglas Rd and a Vicarage at 64 Vale Rd,

1951/52.

Link to Map #32

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St Michael's Church, between Vale Rd & Douglas Rd and a Vicarage at 64 Vale Rd, 1951/52.

Link to Map #32

Thats the one, St Michaels had now become a what looked like sectional building,

the late George Ellis a local used to run film shows on occasions there,

the small building in the same ground was a sort of bandstand come stage.

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Thats the one, St Michaels had now become a what looked like sectional building,

the late George Ellis a local used to run film shows on occasions there,

the small building in the same ground was a sort of bandstand come stage.

Spent many happy winters nights there watching Popeye, Laurel and Hardey etc. Seem to remember it cost 2 oldpence to get in. Also went to Christmas partys there as well.

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A more recent photo of Holy Trinity on Nursery Street with Aizlewoods Mill in the background. The church is now a "gospel" type church and seems to be very well attended. Its now called the "New Testament Church Of God"

.

Didn't Pete Stringfellow have shows in the church hall before he went to St Aiden's City Road?

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A more recent photo of Holy Trinity on Nursery Street with Aizlewoods Mill in the background. The church is now a "gospel" type church and seems to be very well attended. Its now called the "New Testament Church Of God"

.

Searching through a pile of papers the other day, I came across the Centenary Booklet (1848-1948) for this church. As an 11 year old cub, I took part in most of the Centennial services and events. The booklet contained the following historic note, which you may find interesting.

"The rite of Consecrating and Dedicating the Church of Holy Trinity, recently erected at the corner of Johnson Street and Nursery Street, Wicker was performed yesterday (Friday) by his Grace the Archbishop of York. The admission was by ticket, and so great was the interest excited that the applications was double the number the building would accommodate.

The Wicker district, for the dense population of which this Church has been erected, to provide a more ready and convenient access to the public ministrations of the Established Church, is one of the new parishes constituted by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The Edifice, the first stone of which was laid by Joseph Wilson, Esq., on 30th June, 1847, and which, including the site, has cost six thousand pounds has been entirely built by the Christian bounty of the Misses Harrison of Weston, to whose piety and munificence Sheffield and the neighbourhood are indebted for the foundation and advancement of many pious and benevolent works.

The style and architecture is the plain early-English. The exterior is has little of novelty to commend it, the Misses Harrison having dictated to their architects, Messrs Flockton, Lee and Flockton, an exact copy of the church at Attercliffe. The area and galleries will accommodate one thousand persons. The internal dimensions are 65 feet by 47 feet 6 inches, height to the square of the roof 30 feet, from the floor to the roof 45 feet, chancel 20 feet by 10 feet 6 inches, besides staircase, vestry and entrance. The material of which the church is built is Wadsley gritstone for quoins, jambs and arches, filled with coursed wallstone from Green Moor quarries.

The building is endowed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, who have vested the patronage in the hands of the Misses Harrison, the benevolent founders of the church. The living has been bestowed on the Rev. William Bruce, former incumbent of Wadsley, whose talent and zeal peculiarly fit him for the appointment. The books for the reading desk and pulpit were given by the S.P.C.K.

The pews have been extensively taken, and at present few sittings remain unoccupied, except those which are free.

Note for Centennial: All are now free and not always unoccupied€

The Archbishop arrived in Sheffield on Thursday and became the guest of the Misses Harrison, at whose residence at Weston several clergymen and gentry had the honour of dinning with His Grace. The 24th Psalm was repeated as the Archbishop, Archdeacon and Clergy proceeded up the aisle to the communion table. At the conclusion of the Service, an appropriate sermon was preached by Rev. W. Bruce from verses 16 and 17 of Psalm 90. The Service concluded, the Archbishop walked in procession to the grounds attached to the church, which was then consecrated by His Grace.

Afterwards, His Grace partook of some refreshment in the vestry and then walked, in company with the Rev. W. Bruce to the Midland Railway Station where he took his departure for Bishopthorpe Palace.

The morning collection amounted to sixty four pounds, eight shillings and ten pence.

(From the Sheffield & Rotherham Independent, 14th October, 1848)

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Falls,

would there be any mention of Great War memorials in that booklet you have ? I know there was a Book of Remembrance, and where it is now, just wondering if there's anything else.

Dean.

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Falls,

would there be any mention of Great War memorials in that booklet you have ? I know there was a Book of Remembrance, and where it is now, just wondering if there's anything else.

Dean.

Hello,

The booklet has a page entitled "Memorials"; however, its principly those of former vicars who died while serving the parish, plus two parishoners.

The last entry on this page reads:-

The "Chapel of Chivalry" perpetuates the names of those who by bravery have served their fellow men."

Its likely the Parish lost quite a few in WWI and there may be a memorial tablet attached to one of the walls or columns. I can't remember.

I have a personal interest in knowing what happened to some of the items that were on the table in the Chapel. The Parish lost two service men in WWII and their photographs were in a frame on the table. One of these was my Mother's adopted brother.

Regards

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Hello,

The booklet has a page entitled "Memorials"; however, its principly those of former vicars who died while serving the parish, plus two parishoners.

The last entry on this page reads:-

The "Chapel of Chivalry" perpetuates the names of those who by bravery have served their fellow men."

Its likely the Parish lost quite a few in WWI and there may be a memorial tablet attached to one of the walls or columns. I can't remember.

I have a personal interest in knowing what happened to some of the items that were on the table in the Chapel. The Parish lost two service men in WWII and their photographs were in a frame on the table. One of these was my Mother's adopted brother.

Regards

Hi Falls - from our records there were 4 ?

AB Vincent Barlow

Pte James Bradley

Spr William Gibbins

Sgt James Kirkham

also 6 civilians killed in the Blitz

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Hi Falls - from our records there were 4 ?

AB Vincent Barlow

Pte James Bradley

Spr William Gibbins

Sgt James Kirkham

also 6 civilians killed in the Blitz

Hi,

The photographs I knew were for Sgt. James Kirkham and what may have been AB Vincent Barlow (a Naval person anyway). I wasn't aware of the other two casualties, at least I can't remember anything on display on the table.

regards

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