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Exposed

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Exposed, by what?

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Well they must have knocked something down ! Dunno what !

More information on the site :

BOWER SPRING FURNACE

http://www.topforge.co.uk/Magazines/Bower%201.htm

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Inner Ring Road, Shalesmoor

Digging up the past...

http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/Digging-up-the-past.1210792.jp

Most interesting.

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It's behind the boozer ....

http://www2.shu.ac.uk/sfca/claimDetails.cfm?claim=6-5489

Some details from Flood Claims Archive

plus an appendix to the above

http://www2.shu.ac.uk/sfca/claimDetails.cfm?claim=11-5489

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Did you take that picture, are there more ? Look forward to seeing more of this. Thank You.

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This site is the last remains of two Cementation Furnaces built around 1828. They were in the Frankin Works of Thomas Turton. It is thought that the furnaces were used until 1911, by which time the works was owned by Moss & Gamble.

From :

http://www.topforge.co.uk/Other%20Prop.htm

Picture from same source

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Relevant information from :

http://www.hist-met.org/hmsnews61.pdf

Bower Spring Cementation works

Christine Ball

Excavations have been carried out by ARCUS next to the remains of the cementation furnace at Bower Spring, off Russell Street, Sheffield (NGR SK 3527 8790). The cementation furnace, which is owned by the South Yorkshire Industrial History Society (SYIHS) and is a Scheduled Ancient Monument, was once part of the former Franklin Works, part of which is to be removed by the Inner Relief Road. They are the only remains in Sheffield where you can see a cross-section of a furnace.

The works was built c1825 by Turton Bros and sold to Moss & Gamble, who were merchants and makers of steel and files, in 1853. The works was visited in 1858 by Walter White who wrote a lively (and accurate) description of the processes he observed.

The site was damaged by the 1864 Dale Dyke Dam flood and, in the new online Flood Claims database (www2.shu.ac.uk/sfca/databaseLinks.cfm), we have been able to find much detail of layout, room functions, personnel, wages lost and equipment damaged.

ARCUS were digging for three weeks and have uncovered the rest of the works site, including most of the original 20 crucible holes. Sadly, some of these will be lost to the road, but most of the rest, and their cellars, should be able to be preserved. The crucible holes are adjacent to the remains of the westernmost furnace and an extension to the scheduled area will enable their protection. It is proposed to backfill, cover and pave the part of the site between the road and the scheduled area.

We are liaising with the City Council, the South Yorkshire Archaeology Service and with English Heritage to preserve more of the remains and display them to the public. English Heritage has offered to contribute funds for the conservation of the remains and the SYIHS is looking to raise the extra money needed.

Email: c.ball@sheffield.ac.uk

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Extract, Spring 2006

Redevelopment in Sheffield, including a new section of the Inner Relief Road through the Kelham Island and Shalesmoor area, has allowed for the excavation of important sites from the early days of the Sheffield steel industry. The bases of five cementation furnaces were found at the west end of the Millsands site where the Vickers industrial empire began in the 1820s. Another 19th century cementation furnace base at the 18th century Love & Manson site in Snow Hill had been built over an existing cellar and a well preserved crucible furnace was found on the site of the Hope Works, Mowbray Street. The scheduled remains of the 1820s cementation furnaces at Bower Spring owned by the South Yorkshire Industrial History Society are right by the new road. They were part of the Franklin or Spring Works, now demolished. Its foundations were excavated before the road was built, revealing remains of the yard, workshops and warehouses, an arched structure thought to be a boiler water reservoir and some of the crucible furnaces.

http://www.industrialhistory.yas.org.uk/content/news066.html

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A few more pics of the same site.

Looks some really interesting archeology just under the surface

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Excellent, Thanks for posting those.

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Just found a couple more.

and here's one I made earlier.

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Nice repair job on the last one !!! (I know it well ...)

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Sheffield Bower Spring Cementation Furnace

Scheduled Ancient Monument E (B)

Condition Very bad

Trust Remains of two early C19 brick-built cementation furnaces, with parts of the cone-shaped superstructures incorporated in a boundary wall.

Very rare survivals of once common furnaces used for early methods of mass producing steel.

Contact Keith Miller 01904 601990

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/upload/...Humber_2007.pdf

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Just driven past the Bower Spring site, it looks as though someone has gained entry by removing a section of the temporary fence. On another note what a great site

(http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/upload/pdf/BAR_Yorkshire_Humber_2007.pdf), Which one would you rescue if you had the money? or maybe this should be a new thread.

Mark

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I was nearby this site today and popped over to take a photo. Look at the difference over the last 5 years or so - anyone know what is happening there? It is a great location for a site being opened for display and information, and a wasted opportunity.

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considering the site is on an arterial route into the city, the state it is left in is a disgrace and embarrassment to the city and to Kelham island.

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