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mickjj

Fargate

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In the middle of the city centre Fargate is a popular pedestrian area offering a wealth of high street stores with an emphasis on fashion. Fargate is also a popular place for street entertainers, musicians and specialist markets. The Anglican cathedral is at one end and Town Hall square is at the other, linking Fargate with both Barkers Pool, home to the magnificent City Hall and John Lewis department store, and Surrey St – leading to the Winter Garden, Millennium Galleries and the train station. Note Orchard Square with its blend of high street, quality independent stores and popular craft workshops. The focal point is an animated chiming clock offering a reminder of Sheffield’s cutlery heritage.

In his "A DESCRIPTION OF THE TOWN OF SHEFFIELD: the author, Joseph Woolhouse wrote in the year 1832 at the time the Cholera was raging in Sheffield", "In going up Fargate there was houses built on both sides. The Lords House stood a little on the North side of the present Norfolk Row. A very elegant old House, it was inclosed by a Wall in a half Circle and Palisaded. The present Duke of Norfolk was born in this house. This I expect is the reason why it was called the Lord's house, he being I.of the Manor".

The Fargate thoroughfare was closed of an became a pedestrian precinct in 1973.

Fargate, 1930

Fargate 1993

Fargate - copyright Citysnapper

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And here's a really old picture - circa 1900, taken from an old postcard

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http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/uploads/monthly_03_2007/post-1-1173635622.jpghttp://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/uploads/monthly_03_2007/post-1-1173635615.jpg

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When was the large fountain removed from the top of Fargate, I remember it used to be full of empty crisp packets and cans, think this was the reason its gone. But I can not remember how long its been gone.

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When was the large fountain removed from the top of Fargate, I remember it used to be full of empty crisp packets and cans, think this was the reason its gone. But I can not remember how long its been gone.

It was called the Goodwin Fountain and presented to the City by Sir Stuart Goodwin. On Rag Night students poured liquid soap into it. Biggest bubble bath I've ever seen.

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When was the large fountain removed from the top of Fargate, I remember it used to be full of empty crisp packets and cans, think this was the reason its gone. But I can not remember how long its been gone.

about 10 years ago when they refurbed Fargate with all the cobbles and all that

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I used to be a Manager at Jackson the Tailor on Fargate it was taken over by Burtons.

David

A Brit in the USA

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I used to be a Manager at Jackson the Tailor on Fargate it was taken over by Burtons.

David

A Brit in the USA

Link to picturesheffield

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Why is fargate called "FARGATE" was it the furthest gate from the castle, was it a gate to a field or has it any connection to the Exchange GATEway.

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Why is fargate called "FARGATE" was it the furthest gate from the castle, was it a gate to a field or has it any connection to the Exchange GATEway.

Now there's a good question tozzin.

I'm sure you'll get some good answers to this one although I'm not going

to have any wild guesses myself because they would most likely be wrong.

But it does make you think doesn't it?

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Why is fargate called "FARGATE" was it the furthest gate from the castle, was it a gate to a field or has it any connection to the Exchange GATEway.

I would say that your first guess (the furthest "gate" from the castle) would most likely be correct.

Although the castle could be replaced with the entire settlement of Sheffield.

In many British fortified settlements, York and London being prime examples, the entrance and exit points are referred to as "gates", regardless of weather an actual physical gate really existed. York has many street names to this day ending in "gate" eg Cliftongate and minstergate, Lincoln has Eastgate and London has districts like Billingsgate which marked main routes into and out of the fortified City area.

In France there are areas called "portes" and a trip around the Paris outer peripherie ring road will take you through a number of districts called "porte de .." something or other. Literal translation porte = door, so has the same meaning as gate.

So in Sheffield the assumption has to be that an area called gate was an early entrance point into the town or at least its inner fortified section.

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My personal favorites : Bondgate Within and Bondgate Without - Alnwick worth a picture ... maybe.

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Fargate, can a corner really move ?

Just for fun

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timestamp='1327498986' post='101494']

There's a Whip ma whop ma gate in York, that takes some beating!

The text accompanying that image confirms what I posted above,

"The name of the street has nothing to do with a gateway or gate, it is derived from the Viking name for a street, " gata".

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The Info given will be in the Retro "W.T.E.T." on the 11th of February, thanks you will be mentioned.

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Fargate, can a corner really move ?

Just for fun

Got to agree with one thing there, all Fargate is these days is a long line of mobile phone shops.

How many are there/

Some are even next door to each other

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The text accompanying that image confirms what I posted above,

"The name of the street has nothing to do with a gateway or gate, it is derived from the Viking name for a street, " gata".

Read my post again Steve

I said that it was an entrance / exit point to somewhere (a street would satisfy that definition) and that it may not have a physical gate (so it does not have to have a gate as such)

Fargate would have been on the main route into the town from the south west.

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The Info given will be in the Retros "W.T.E.T." on the 11th of February, thanks you will be mentioned.

Tozzin, get the people who run RETRO to get their act together for either the 11th February or the week after (18th).

What we want to see in the RETRO one one of those weeks is a big section called

THE 1962 SHEFFIELD GALE 50th ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL EDITION

With plenty of pictures and stories, - even a reprint of the original 1962 special suppliment.

I know that the RETRO already does a 25 years ago and 50 years ago section but this is usually quite small and of general / National issues rather than just Sheffield.

The '62 gale was a big event for Sheffield, something that many of us that lived through it have never forgotten.

It deserves a special RETRO coverage.

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Tozzin, get the people who run RETRO to get their act together for either the 11th February or the week after (18th).

What we want to see in the RETRO one one of those weeks is a big section called

THE 1962 SHEFFIELD GALE 50th ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL EDITION

With plenty of pictures and stories, - even a reprint of the original 1962 special suppliment.

I know that the RETRO already does a 25 years ago and 50 years ago section but this is usually quite small and of general / National issues rather than just Sheffield.

The '62 gale was a big event for Sheffield, something that many of us that lived through it have never forgotten.

It deserves a special RETRO coverage.

Im sure they covered this a week or so ago, not an indepth report but it was in. If you have any queries at all just e-mail Paul.License@sheffieldnewspapers.co.uk with your suggestions, hes a very amiable man.

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Im sure they covered this a week or so ago, not an indepth report but it was in. If you have any queries at all just e-mail Paul.License@sheffieldnewspapers.co.uk with your suggestions, hes a very amiable man.

It's because they keep mentioning it piecemeal and using the same half dozen pictures of it that it never gets an in depth coverage.

In the topic on here about the 1962 gale someone said they thought there was going to be a book about it for the 50th anniversary, but it turned out that the book is going to be about extreme weather in Sheffield of all types and from all time periods on record.

However, a book exclusively on the Sheffield gale would be good.

But I suppose either -, 1. it will never happen, or 2. It will be a 100th anniversary book so I won't be around to enjoy it or 3. i will end up having to write the book myself.

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