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Ten bob note


RichardB
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You've got £3 4/- and ninepence hapenny

You spend £2 9/- and 11d

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What does the "d" stand for ?

How much is left ?

How much is a pint in 1931 ?

and how much is "half a Dollar" ?

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I discussed this calculation with a Texas Instruments engineer in Texas last time I was over there, he failed but does want some more 3/4 length sports trousers ....

Base 20, Base 12, Base 2 - easy ...

Old people are not allowed to answer, let's say over 37 and you're out, give it to a young 'un, watch 'em struggle

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No internet allowed on this one !!!! When did decimalisation come into force ? What date ?

If you get it right, I'll ask a really hard-question about philately to confirm ....... lol

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Guest crookesmoorlad

No internet allowed on this one !!!! When did decimalisation come into force ? What date ?

If you get it right, I'll ask a really hard-question about philately to confirm ....... lol

February 15th 1971 , I was working nights at Hadfield's East Hecla works ,on Vulcan Rd Sheffield. , but don't know nowt about stamps , only lickin 'em

lol

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Guest crookesmoorlad

"d" stands for old penny

you will have 14shillings and 10 1/2 d left ( fourteen shillings and ten pence hapenny )

don't know how much a pint was in 1931

half a" Dollar" was 2/6 (two shillings and sixpence )

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Im too young to remember Ha Ha............

Ok Im not its the reason I have trouble adding up. The first 6 months I learned pounds shillings and pence with difficulty then they said to forget all that and to learn the decimal system. I think I just forgot everything and used to cry when they said it was maths. Nothing has changed. I still hate arithmatic. Thats why I am in the credit dept. he he

Sue

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February 15th 1971 , I was working nights at Hadfield's East Hecla works ,on Vulcan Rd Sheffield. , but don't know nowt about stamps , only lickin 'em

lol

Good Man, spot on, don't tell anyone else, keep 'em guessing !

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"d" stands for old penny

you will have 14shillings and 10 1/2 d left ( fourteen shillings and ten pence hapenny )

don't know how much a pint was in 1931

half a" Dollar" was 2/6 (two shillings and sixpence )

"D" stands for a word ... Roman word, but a word

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I know what it is but I googled it so Im not saying.

If you dont know the answer cheat. I still know the answer. he he

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Is it dinari, dineri, dinsummat or other I think (maybe) :(:(:(

Exceptionally close ... even I'm not sure how to spell it, and I've banned myself from looking it up !

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Guest plain talker

L S D ( :unsure: not the drug(! :blink: ) it was the Roman for Librae, Sistercii, Dinarius:- Pounds shillings and pence (denarius is the Latin root for the Spanish word "diniero" - money)

Half a dollar is half a crown or 2/6 . In our house, a dollar was (and still is) five bob (A "crown") from when the US dollar was four-to-the pound.

I still call a 50p piece a "ten-bob", and still think in "old" money, I was commenting the other day about a loaf I bought which was £1.93, being nearly 40 bob, and how obscene that price was for a standard loaf..

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Reminds me of a story I think from Tony Capstick of blessed memory.

A man goes into a DIY shop and asks for some 2 inch by 1 inch timber. The shopkeeper says " Nay lad, it's all metric now tha knows". " Alright" says the man," how much is the metric equivalent?" . "Five bob a yard" says the the shopkeeper.

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L S D ( :unsure: not the drug(! :blink: ) it was the Roman for Librae, Sistercii, Dinarius:- Pounds shillings and pence (denarius is the Latin root for the Spanish word "diniero" - money)

Half a dollar is half a crown or 2/6 . In our house, a dollar was (and still is) five bob (A "crown") from when the US dollar was four-to-the pound.

I still call a 50p piece a "ten-bob", and still think in "old" money, I was commenting the other day about a loaf I bought which was £1.93, being nearly 40 bob, and how obscene that price was for a standard loaf..

Of course I am not the one to comment on PT's age but do you know how long it is since the exchange rate was 4 US dollars to the £ ? I reckon it was just at the start of the first world war (1914ish) but I may be wrong on that.

I still convert all prices to £sd to this day and use the same sort of phrase as PT, except instead of being a ten bob NOTE, 50p is refered to as a ten bob BIT. I'm sure I do it deliberately to confuse people and wind them up.

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Guest plain talker

Of course I am not the one to comment on PT's age but do you know how long it is since the exchange rate was 4 US dollars to the £ ? I reckon it was just at the start of the first world war (1914ish) but I may be wrong on that.

I still convert all prices to £sd to this day and use the same sort of phrase as PT, except instead of being a ten bob NOTE, 50p is refered to as a ten bob BIT. I'm sure I do it deliberately to confuse people and wind them up.

Ahh, Daveh, I have always been an "old fashioned" little beggar, as my Granny would have said. but no:- I'm a baby-boomer, not a veteran of WWI (heheheh).

I often get chuckles from the older Star vendors in town when I hand over a 50p and say "There's ten bob.." Even now I talk to my dad about something being "thirty bob".

It's weird, cos when measuring, I can visualise a yard, yet can't visualise the same length in metres, or an inch, but not centimetres. I can look at a block of butter when baking, and see where to cut an ounce, but I can't fathom 25 grammes. it's strange. Decimalisation came in officially in 1971, almost thirty-eight years ago (and we had the coinage from about '68) but I still think in old money.

Speaking of old money... A bit of a funny story here...

When my youngest sister was born, 31 years ago, this month, Dec 77, the midwife came to call to check on her and my mother, and the MW bundled baby up in a nappy, and hung her from the hand-held scales.

"ah, yes," said MW... She's gaining weight nicely. Baby's now two thousand six hundred and fifty grammes"

"Ehhhh?" said my Poppa, banjaxed. :huh::blink: "What's tha mee-an, 2,650 grammes? What's that in owd money?" lol

(She was just shy of 6 lbs, actually, about 5lb 13/5lbs 14)

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Ahh, Daveh, I have always been an "old fashioned" little beggar, as my Granny would have said. but no:- I'm a baby-boomer, not a veteran of WWI (heheheh).

I often get chuckles from the older Star vendors in town when I hand over a 50p and say "There's ten bob.." Even now I talk to my dad about something being "thirty bob".

It's weird, cos when measuring, I can visualise a yard, yet can't visualise the same length in metres, or an inch, but not centimetres. I can look at a block of butter when baking, and see where to cut an ounce, but I can't fathom 25 grammes. it's strange. Decimalisation came in officially in 1971, almost thirty-eight years ago (and we had the coinage from about '68) but I still think in old money.

Speaking of old money... A bit of a funny story here...

When my youngest sister was born, 31 years ago, this month, Dec 77, the midwife came to call to check on her and my mother, and the MW bundled baby up in a nappy, and hung her from the hand-held scales.

"ah, yes," said MW... She's gaining weight nicely. Baby's now two thousand six hundred and fifty grammes"

"Ehhhh?" said my Poppa, banjaxed. :huh::blink: "What's tha mee-an, 2,650 grammes? What's that in owd money?" lol

(She was just shy of 6 lbs, actually, about 5lb 13/5lbs 14)

My background in science and maths means that Imperial or Metric makes little difference to me, - I'm ambidextrous at it and some people would give their right arm for that.

Certain measures are prefered or expected in particular places. To annoy people I quote money in Imperial £/s/d, but to annoy my doctor I always give my weight in kilograms and my height in metres because he expects people to know these in Imperial.

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I still convert all prices to £sd to this day and use the same sort of phrase as PT, except instead of being a ten bob NOTE, 50p is refered to as a ten bob BIT. I'm sure I do it deliberately to confuse people and wind them up.

A ten bob note and a ten bob bit

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HI A pint in 1931 was 4d and 5d mild and bitter up to the first budget 1939 it was 5d and 6d mild and bitter skeets

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HI A pint in 1931 was 4d and 5d mild and bitter up to the first budget 1939 it was 5d and 6d mild and bitter skeets

When I became officially old enough to drink in the early 1970's beer cost 12p a pint and a bus ride anywhere in Sheffield cost 2p.

So a Saturday night out cost

Bus fare out = 2p

8 pints of beer (YES! one GALLON of beer!!) at 12 p a pint = 12 x 8 = 96p

Bus fare home = 2p

Total for night out +2+96+2 =100p =£1

Yes, a full night out boozing and all you needed was a £1 note in your trousers back pocket!

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