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Where were the following districts of Sheffield please


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RichardB

Two fields Near Jeoffrey Croft and Far Jeoffrey Croft, where were they ? what did they become.

(Part of Old Sheffield Town, not some outlying district, mater of fact remarkably central)

These fields pass the "cricket ball test" i.e. if you were stood in the Cathedral grounds you could chuck a cricket ball and hit 'em.

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Guest dargy

High hazels is down as Handsworth Hill estate on the map, alongside High Hazels park. Olivers Mount is part of it.

Parkwood Springs is where the Ski village is and the area that once was the landfill site.

Sue

parkwood is still as landfill, i work for veolia and we still use it

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RichardB

Two fields Near Jeoffrey Croft and Far Jeoffrey Croft, where were they ? what did they become.

(Part of Old Sheffield Town, not some outlying district, mater of fact remarkably central)

Near Campo Lane, very near ...

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RichardB

Paradise square and Heartshead?

Both formed Paradise Square ... prior to Hicks Style Field name.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Guest Coldstreamer

I remember my parents taking me on to Parkwood Springs when I was young. We used to access it from the top of Rutland Road, there were no buildings on it then. There was a stream at one time with fresh water shrimp in it! Every spring time there would be skylarks nesting and if you got too close to a nest the bird would soar straight up into the air singing. Right on the very top were the concrete remains of a war-time anti-aircraft gun battery with the shelters still intact and us kids used to play in them. I believe that Douglas Road ran over the lower part of Parkwood Springs and came out where Shirecliffe dumpit site is now. There were allotments up there but they were moved off when the council decided to use the area as a rubbish tip. Right over the back of it is an old cemetery which is interesting in the fact that there are several graves of soldiers who were stationed in Hillsborough Barracks in the 1800's.

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RichardB

This one is more of a statement than a question, interesting though

1566 Roberte Rogher for his house betwen the waters (a place afterwards called The Isle and sometimes the Isle of Wight)

Approximately the site of the Exchange Brewery.

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THYLACINE

Hollow Meadows was part of the Middlewood hospital complex and had various uses over the years. In the Sheffield Archive there are records of patients from 28.04.1924 to 12.05.1976 under ref NHS3/6/2.

Please see attached some photos I took recently looking down onto the site which is now converted into very nice flats. Happy for anyone to use them, I took them as one of my father in laws rellies was in there in the 1940/50's and I added to my family tree photo archive.

Enjoy !

Had many fond memories of Hollow Meadows, great to see your photo's of what it looks like now. No, I wasn't an inmate, my best mate used to live at Crawshaw Head House which is on the road that runs parallel to Manchester Road on the high side. It was a beaut big old stone house with a MASSIVE stone wall out the front, his dad used to rent the house for one pound a week, I spent a lot of time there in the late 1960's. The house looked down on the Hollow Meadows Hospital, it was a bit spooky to see lights burning late at night out on the moors. We used to ride our motorbikes past the hospital on the way to the Norfolk Arms and there would always be someone to wave at us. Very sad, at the time it was used as a mental hospital, or as we called it, a looney bin.

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Guest Gramps

This one is more of a statement than a question, interesting though

1566 Roberte Rogher for his house betwen the waters (a place afterwards called The Isle and sometimes the Isle of Wight)

Approximately the site of the Exchange Brewery.

Presumably because it was surrounded by water. There were several 'islands' in Sheffield....Bacon Island, Kelham Island, Sheaf Island and Long Island.....any more ?

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THYLACINE

Hollow Meadows was part of the Middlewood hospital complex and had various uses over the years. In the Sheffield Archive there are records of patients from 28.04.1924 to 12.05.1976 under ref NHS3/6/2.

Please see attached some photos I took recently looking down onto the site which is now converted into very nice flats. Happy for anyone to use them, I took them as one of my father in laws rellies was in there in the 1940/50's and I added to my family tree photo archive.

Enjoy !

I have fond memories of Hollow Meadows, not that I was ever a patient there but my best mate used to live at Crawshaw Head House, a big old stone house on the road that runs parallel with Manchester Road on the high side. His parents used to rent it for one pound a week, I spent many nights there in the late 1960's. Crawshaw Head overlooked Hollow Meadows Hospital, it was very spooky at times to see the lights of the hospital burning late at night out on the moors. We would ride our motorbikes past the hospital on our way to the Norfolk Arms and there was an old man who used to wave at us as we went past. It was very sad because it was used as a mental hospital then, or a looney bin as we used to call it. Thanks for the pictures, I wouldn't have recognised it, it must have been totally rebuilt.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 5 weeks later...

Dog Kennel

Tremendous, I know the names of two residents (so far) of Dog Kennel (1820's) so its not just a place name ... but where was it ?

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The following piece appeared in The Sheffield and Rotherham Independent for Saturday 21st December 1872

---- The shooters took their recreation in the neighbouring country, where there was any game which might have a chance of bagging; and if a gun could be procured the young aspirants went into the fields to have a shot at small birds or crows, or anything else that were of the feathered tribe, and sometimes accidents occurred for want of a proper knowledge of the use of fire arms. The regular professed shooters were fond of displaying the success they had had amongst each other where they knew they were safe from informers, and their place of rendezvous was at Pinchacroft lane, which, from the quantity of dogs that were generally in the house, got termed the Dog Kennel.

(I don't know where Pinchacroft Lane is/was though.)

=====================

There was one in Chesterfield as well

One such area in Chesterfield was known as 'Dog Kennels'. Early 19th century maps of Chesterfield show a 'Subscription Dog Kennel' on a footpath near the River Hipper between the Silk Mill and Wheeldon Lane. Was this the forerunner of today's Animal Shelter? Images of the Dog Pound in Disney, or 'Tom and Jerry' Cartoons also spring to mind! Later in the 19th century, after this building had disappeared, the old yards in this area lying between Low Pavement and the River became known as the Dog Kennels. Some of the houses in the area were centuries old, circa 1750 being amongst the most recent. In later years they housed mainly the Irish population of the town, becoming overcrowded and insanitary dwellings.

====================

And Elsecar

From Elsecar we head through Kings Wood and pass Wentworth Woodhouse crossing between Dog Kennel and Morley ponds and up through Trowels Wood towards Wentworth church, passing the Almshouses and onto Mill Lane with it’s converted windmill and follow the edge of Elsecar Reservoir back to Elsecar.

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The following piece appeared in The Sheffield and Rotherham Independent for Saturday 21st December 1872

---- The shooters took their recreation in the neighbouring country, where there was any game which might have a chance of bagging; and if a gun could be procured the young aspirants went into the fields to have a shot at small birds or crows, or anything else that were of the feathered tribe, and sometimes accidents occurred for want of a proper knowledge of the use of fire arms. The regular professed shooters were fond of displaying the success they had had amongst each other where they knew they were safe from informers, and their place of rendezvous was at Pinchacroft lane, which, from the quantity of dogs that were generally in the house, got termed the Dog Kennel.

(I don't know where Pinchacroft Lane is/was though.)

Nice find !

and you've raised a question as well !

Consider for a moment my original posting relates to the 1820's, your reply to 50 years later - might have an influence on the answers to the two questions - just a thought. My answer is definately "Old Sheffield Town", there is a strong possibility the answer to yours is part of a newer part of Old Sheffield, to me Crofts is out Scotland Street/Broad Lane way (and thats NOT the answer to my original post.

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I have a Thomas Tingle listed under "Steel Refiner & Converters" at Dog Kennel, The Wicker, Sheffield

I think the year is 1822 but I'm not sure.

I'll keep trying to work it out.

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I have a Thomas Tingle listed under "Steel Refiner & Converters" at Dog Kennel, The Wicker, Sheffield

I think the year is 1822 but I'm not sure.

I'll keep trying to work it out.

I'd say you've cracked it ! Well done that man.

The document I have says simply

Thomas Tingle, Steel refiner & convertor, Wicker and is definately 1822.

In addition :

John Yates, boot & shoe maker, 3 Dog Kennel, Wicker

William Aldham, boot & shoe maker, 4 Dog Kennel, Wicker

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Thought I'd found another

Hilsbury

1829 Mrs Mary Rimington, Hilsbury

but

1833 Mary Rimington, Gentlewoman, Hillsbro' House

-----------------------------------------

Hillsbro' House ??

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Here are a few from 1829, I've given you all the information I have - I've never heard of any of these and I do read a lot of Directories ...

Eliza. Fisher, Dress Maker, Heppleston Row

John Unwin, Packing box and case makers/Opticians, Amos-green Square

John Cockhill, Joiners tool makers, Amos Green Square

James Booker, Shopkeepers & Dealers in Groceries and Sundries, Vickers' Grove

David Walton, Shopkeepers & Dealers in Groceries and Sundries, Bread Street

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Struggler's Grinding Wheel (1820's)

Never heard of it.

Pigot's Directory of 1829.

Bone Merchants,

(See also Horn Merchants.)

Hodgson George, (strugglers' grinding wheel) Norris fields.

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Here are a few from 1829, I've given you all the information I have - I've never heard of any of these and I do read a lot of Directories ...

Eliza. Fisher, Dress Maker, Heppleston Row

John Unwin, Packing box and case makers/Opticians, Amos-green Square

John Cockhill, Joiners tool makers, Amos Green Square

James Booker, Shopkeepers & Dealers in Groceries and Sundries, Vickers' Grove

David Walton, Shopkeepers & Dealers in Groceries and Sundries, Bread Street

Vickers Grove - Hillfoot (1837)

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  • 4 weeks later...

Handley Hill ?

A DESCRIPTION OF THE TOWN OF SHEFFIELD

in my remembrance wrote in the year 1832 at the time the

Cholera was raging in Sheffield..

BY JOSEPH WOOLHOUSE.

.

"By Handley Hill, Spital Hill is meant. The house of the Handley family,

Hall Carr, was near where the Victoria Corn Mills now stand in Carlisle

Street."

Jehu Lane was always a very narrow, dirty street. The reason as I have

read of the name of Jehu being given to this lane was when Mary

Queen of Scots (who was a prisoner nearly 16 years at the Castle and

Manor House in the Park under the guardianship of the Earl of

Shrewsbury) was going from the Castle to the Manor House through

this lane was then the road. The Coachman in driving thro' this lane

used to make use of this expression to his horses "Jehu," which from

that circumstance derived the name of Jehu Lane, and continues so

to be called to this Day.{33} From here going down Bull Stake on the

right hand was all very low ancient houses with most of them courts

before them and steps to descend from the Street into them, as far

as Dixon Lane. Lower down stood the Castle Laiths. These they

pull'd down to build the Tontine Inn. I can only just remember these.{34}

Where the Town Hall stands was some old Houses, built with

no regularity, from this corner to the corner of Castle Green. Castle

Street was called True Love Gutter, but from what I can't tell.{35}

Down Wain gate was a very hilly Street and a many old houses

irregularly built, no Killing Shambles, we cross over the Bridge

into the Wicker. There was very few houses on the left hand side

from the Bridge to Bridgehouses; on the right hand was all Gardens.

The houses on the right hand going down the Wicker was in no

form; an old house or two stood in the middle of the now Turnpike

road, the Sign of the Cock, which was a calling-house for all the

Grimesthorpe people. It was then a very narrow road to Handly Hill.

Handley Hill was a deal higher than now-.{36}

The Turnpike road went under this hill and came with a bow to

the Sign of the 12 o'Clock. The road came in just at this side of the

12 o'Clock. The present Turnpike road was all Gardens and the foot

road was close by the houses, on the right hand going on this road

was called the Pickle. {37} the Turnpike road from top of Handley Hill

to Grimesthorpe was a very narrow deep lane and the foot road was

along the fields on the right hand side until you came to the narrow

================

Also:

From:- The Royal Exile -Poetical epistles of Mary Queen of Scots. (1822?)

" A LEVEL space of jrronnd extending from the foot of Spital-hill, or

as it is sometimes called Handley-hill, to tlie Lady's bridge is called

the Wicker. It was once a green, and, like the villajie-greens in the

merry times before inclosure-bills were known, this was the place

for the sports, the pastimes, and athletic exercises of the inhabi-

tants of the town.

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"By Handley Hill, Spital Hill is meant. The house of the Handley family,

Hall Carr, was near where the Victoria Corn Mills now stand in Carlisle

Street."

A very fine answer.

What did one Mr. T. Handley do for forty-five of his ninety years ?

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