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Where were the following districts of Sheffield please


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Well I don't know where somewhere "Specifically" called Glebe Land is, but I think I'm right in saying that Glebe Land is land that belongs to a church that's rented "or given maybe" for other purposes. Eg. farming.

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Guest plain talker

Well I don't know where somewhere "Specifically" called Glebe Land is, but I think I'm right in saying that Glebe Land is land that belongs to a church that's rented "or given maybe" for other purposes. Eg. farming.

There is a Glebelands Road in Stocksbridge.

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Upper Slack ?

Slack Laith ?

Lamb Hill ?

Dunno about Lamb Hill although I probably could find it. Upper Slack and Nether Slack were water wheels on the Loxley just before it joins the Don and you can see Slack Laith Turnpike on the map below. Slack is also a Sheffield surname that goes back a long way and probably derives from this place; many of that name were 'victuallers' - I knew one myself.

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Well I don't know where somewhere "Specifically" called Glebe Land is, but I think I'm right in saying that Glebe Land is land that belongs to a church that's rented "or given maybe" for other purposes. Eg. farming.

I think that's about right. Glebe was the term for land or property donated to or acquired by the church to provide some income for the incumbent minister.

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Well I don't know where somewhere "Specifically" called Glebe Land is, but I think I'm right in saying that Glebe Land is land that belongs to a church that's rented "or given maybe" for other purposes. Eg. farming.

I think we can safely say "where Glebe Land WAS ..."; actually falls within the bounds of Old Sheffield Town, pretty much as central as you can get, there WAS a Church there at one time, so that should dramatically reduce the possible places.

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'GOOSE TURD GREENE' a green in Sheffield.

Children used to gather this material.

It was used by old wives in washing to soften the water.

The place is now called ' Goose Green '

" Is this so called 'material' what I think it is?" :unsure:

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I think we can safely say "where Glebe Land WAS ..."; actually falls within the bounds of Old Sheffield Town, pretty much as central as you can get, there WAS a Church there at one time, so that should dramatically reduce the possible places.

In that case I'd guess it was somewhere within Vicarage Croft, perhaps the site of St. James church ?

I'm interested in where you have found this reference because 'Glebe Land' seems a stranger to Sheffield. I can't see a single reference to it in Harrison's Survey; he uses the term 'Church Lands' throughout , with some 40 references in the index. And there is no mention of 'Glebe' in George Tolley's A History of the Sheffield Church Burgesses.

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'GOOSE TURD GREENE' a green in Sheffield.

Children used to gather this material.

It was used by old wives in washing to soften the water.

The place is now called ' Goose Green '

" Is this so called 'material' what I think it is?" :unsure:

They used to call a spade a spade so I imagine a turd would be a turd. he he

There were two 'Goose Greens' in the area. One in Highfields - the Royal Hotel now stands on part of it. The other was the green in Attercliffe, the triangle of land bounded by Leeds road, Worksop road and Attercliffe road.

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In that case I'd guess it was somewhere within Vicarage Croft, perhaps the site of St. James church ?

I'm interested in where you have found this reference because 'Glebe Land' seems a stranger to Sheffield. I can't see a single reference to it in Harrison's Survey; he uses the term 'Church Lands' throughout , with some 40 references in the index. And there is no mention of 'Glebe' in George Tolley's A History of the Sheffield Church Burgesses.

Indeed, I originally got it from an 1837 Directory listing but I've lost that. Here's another source :

Extract :

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 15. 2½.; net income, £500; patrons, P. Gell and A. Lawson, Esqrs. The tithes were commuted for land and annual payments in 1791. The vicarage-house is at the corner of St. James' street, and the glebe-land in its vicinity is covered with buildings. Three stipendiary clergymen, with an income of £400 per annum each, are appointed to assist the vicar, by a body called the "Twelve Capital Burgesses:" this body was incorporated by charter of Queen Mary, and holds certain lands and estates in trust, for the payment of the assistant ministers, the repairs of the church, and the relief of the needy poor. The church was erected in the reign of Henry I., and is a spacious cruciform structure, with a central tower and spire; but the edifice has been so altered by repairs, that, with the exception of part of the tower and spire, and a few small portions of the interior, very little of its original character can be distinguished. The chancel contains the first production from the chisel of Chantrey, a mural tablet with a bust of the Rev. James Wilkinson, late vicar, canopied with drapery, in Carrara marble, erected at the public expense. Many illustrious persons have been interred in the church, including Mary, Countess of Northumberland; Elizabeth, Countess of Lennox, mother of the unfortunate Lady Arabella Stuart; Lady Elizabeth Butler; four earls of Shrewsbury; and Peter Roflet, French secretary of Mary, Queen of Scots.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51267

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Harping back to Parkwood Springs. - If, as the name implies, there are springs there, I wonder what happens to the water (obviously contaminated by the land fill) Does it run into the river Don? And why on earth did they put the landfill on them anyway?

Springs doesn't necessarily imply watercourses. It may refer to a wood exploited by coppicing to produce rods, switches, sapplings.

From the OED:

Spring

"A copse, grove, or wood consisting of young trees springing up naturally from the stools of old ones; a plantation of young trees, esp. one inclosed and used for rearing or harbouring game; a spinney. Now dial."

I believe that the name Rawson Spring Wood is an example of this usage.

Hugh

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132 hits for 'Glebe' in Sheffield Archives Catalogue at A2A - Access to Archives (includes references to places outside Sheffield)

A small sample:

Bargain and sale TT/95/4 2 Jun 1750

Richard Smith, of Sheffield, bookseller, to Joseph Ibberson, of Sheffield, yeoman. A cottage on the W. side of the old churchyard in Sheffield, lately rebuilt upon part of the glebe, now in the tenure of John Chadburn and formerly in the possession of Miss Greaves. For £40. Ground rent of 1s. to the vicar of Sheffield.

Lease TT/137/1 10 Apr 1787

The Rev. James Wilkinson, vicar of Sheffield, clerk, to Joseph Thickett, of Sheffield, skinner. 222 sq. yds. land on the N. side of Church Lane, being part of the glebe land of the parish church of Sheffield. For a term of 99 years. Annual rent of £2 10s. Lessee to build within 3 years one or more houses worth £200, according to a plan and elevation by Joseph Badger, of Sheffield, carpenter.

Assignment of a lease TT/95/7 3 May 1802

Daniel Brammall as TT/95/6, to Henry Jackson, of Sheffield, surgeon. 262½ sq. yds. ground with a messuage thereon in Church St., being part of the glebe of Sheffield, which land was leased by James Wilkinson, vicar of Sheffield, to Joseph Ibberson, of Sheffield, merchant, for a term of 99 years by a deed of 1787. For £735.

Hugh

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Springs doesn't necessarily imply watercourses. It may refer to a wood exploited by coppicing to produce rods, switches, sapplings.

From the OED:

Spring

"A copse, grove, or wood consisting of young trees springing up naturally from the stools of old ones; a plantation of young trees, esp. one inclosed and used for rearing or harbouring game; a spinney. Now dial."

I believe that the name Rawson Spring Wood is an example of this usage.

Hugh

Learning all the time!

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In that case I'd guess it was somewhere within Vicarage Croft, perhaps the site of St. James church ?

I'm interested in where you have found this reference because 'Glebe Land' seems a stranger to Sheffield. I can't see a single reference to it in Harrison's Survey; he uses the term 'Church Lands' throughout , with some 40 references in the index. And there is no mention of 'Glebe' in George Tolley's A History of the Sheffield Church Burgesses.

Well there's a Norton Church Glebe so Glebe is not that unusual in Sheffield.

Between Bunting Nook and Norton Lane'ish

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Springs doesn't necessarily imply watercourses. It may refer to a wood exploited by coppicing to produce rods, switches, sapplings.

From the OED:

Spring

"A copse, grove, or wood consisting of young trees springing up naturally from the stools of old ones; a plantation of young trees, esp. one inclosed and used for rearing or harbouring game; a spinney. Now dial."

I believe that the name Rawson Spring Wood is an example of this usage.

Hugh

I think Parkwood was a spring wood as described, however it was full of natural water springs some of them I've put on this map never dried up even in a hot summer, one that ran under the gas board tip which was on fire and came out at the side of the railway as hot water,

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In that case I'd guess it was somewhere within Vicarage Croft, perhaps the site of St. James church ?

I'm interested in where you have found this reference because 'Glebe Land' seems a stranger to Sheffield. I can't see a single reference to it in Harrison's Survey; he uses the term 'Church Lands' throughout , with some 40 references in the index. And there is no mention of 'Glebe' in George Tolley's A History of the Sheffield Church Burgesses.

I have now unlost the original 1837 Directory, here is the page ...

glebe.pdf

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  • 1 month later...

Springs doesn't necessarily imply watercourses. It may refer to a wood exploited by coppicing to produce rods, switches, sapplings.

From the OED:

Spring

"A copse, grove, or wood consisting of young trees springing up naturally from the stools of old ones; a plantation of young trees, esp. one inclosed and used for rearing or harbouring game; a spinney. Now dial."

I believe that the name Rawson Spring Wood is an example of this usage.

Hugh

Not sure about your example Hugh, Rawson Spring is an actual water source, so in this case perhaps it simply refers to the wood where the spring is?

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Third time I've posted this answer ... Grrrrr

1891

The procession went to a natural amphitheatre neaar Broad Lane, known as #the Brocco' with the platform for speakers erected in Allen Street.

(Arty 1849 map shows Brocco Street in about the correct spot).

A bit more...

"Prior to 1290, Walter the baker of Sheffield conveyed a half-acre plot of land lying upon Brocholecliff to Henry Doget of Sheffield.

In another grant between 1290 and 1305, Stephen Young of Sheffield conveyed another half-acre plot lying upon Brocholecliff tp Simon Halday of Sheffield.

And again in 1305, Robert de Bernis conveyed a third half-acre plot described as in the field of Sheffield and lying upon Brochlecliff to Simon the tailor of Sheffield.

It may be assumed from these that at the close of the 13th century Brocholecliff was part of a common field, which was held and farmed by tenants in half-acre plots.

The name means the hill where the badgers have their setts, but it is unlikely that the setts would be tolerated by the tenants in a field which they farmed, so the name must, even in 1290, have been a survival from earlier times.

Six centuries later, the name remains as The Brocco, which lay between West Bar Green and Jericho."

From "Descriptive Catalogue of Early Charters relating to lands in & near Sheffield" compiled by T. Walter Hall.

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Guest Falls

Millsands runs from Bridge street where the old Whitbreads Brewery was, all new development now including Irwin Mitchell Solicitors.

Bridghouses is behind Nursery Street and West of the old Victoria Station. There was a large Goods Shed at one time.

Hello,

Bridgehouses was the area at the end of Nursery Street on the left bank of the Don and close to the Old Iron Bridge. It took its name from the Bridge House, home to the Clay family. The house itself was destroyed by the MSA/MSL railway company when it built the Bridgehouses Station, that later became the Bridgehouses Goods Yard.

The Brightside Bierlow Township stocks were also located in the same area.

For more details, See Eric Youle's info/history "Reminscenes of Old Sheffield, Chapter IX - The Old Haymarket -The Wicker -The Nursery Bridgehouses."

Regards

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Guest Falls

It was here....

As an aside - I remember, when passing on the tram, seeing those quaint little 3 wheeler tractor/trailer units buzzing around that yard.

They used to call them "Mechanical Horses". With only three wheels on the tractor part and a very short wheel base, they could easily manoeuvered in confined business premises. They first appeared I think, early in the 20th century. The LMS and LNER owned the majority althought other businesses had them. British Rail had the later versions. I only travelled in the later version, but it was still a pretty rough ride.

Regards

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They used to call them "Mechanical Horses". With only three wheels on the tractor part and a very short wheel base, they could easily manoeuvered in confined business premises. They first appeared I think, early in the 20th century. The LMS and LNER owned the majority althought other businesses had them. British Rail had the later versions. I only travelled in the later version, but it was still a pretty rough ride.

Regards

Was it the Mechanical Horse or was it the Scammel Scarab?

British Rail seemed to use a lot of Scammels on jobs like this and they would appear to have a similar construction, something like this one at the 2005 Sheffield Steam rally

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  • 2 weeks later...
RichardB

Cadman's in the fields

Having asked for the four streets surrounding "Brickholes" for this one you have to name one specific building. (1790's)

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