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RichardB

Where were the following districts of Sheffield please

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Iv'e an ancester who lived at Bullstake?? Any takers?

The above passage needs some elucidation to make it intelligible to the modern

reader, especially now that the fussy meddlesomeness of our municipal ~vise-

acres has flouted immemorial usage by merging what was the Fruit Market

in High Street. If, in the year 1784, you had stood near the bottom of Pudding

Lane (King Street) with your back to the Bull Stake (Old Haymarket),

http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry..._circa_1800.txt

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Port Mahon

Something to do with the celebration of the British re-taking the port in Menorca

Port Mahon encompassed the area around the bottom of St Philips Road/ Netherthorpe Road (Pooort Mee-on) about opposite where the petrol station is now

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You just popped out and took these with a big flash gun thingie ?

Nice pictures lol

Funny that! If the photo had been taken sixtyfive years ago in the same spot, that would have read a big gun flash thingie. That was where the ack-ack guns were sighted, and from the photo you can see why.

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Pickle Residents

James Makin and Son table fork and bayonet manufacturer Pickle (Holden's 1811)

George Allen, fork manufacturer, Pickle, Gell & Bennett (1821)

Samuel Harmar & Co., iron founders 34 Pickle (Baine's 1822)

George Makin bill distributer &c. Pickle (White's 1833)

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I LIVED IN SHEFFIELD FOR 80 YRS AND NEVER HEARD OF A PLACE NAMED PICKLE

It was before your time youngster lol

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Add Roscoe Field and Doctor Field and for that Matter Lathe Field.

Roscoe is also well represented out Stannington way.

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It was before your time youngster lol

I believe Pickle was the area from the entrance to the old Midland Station at the bottom of Spital Hill to the 12 O'clock (junction of Saville Street East and Attercliffe Road).

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I believe Pickle was the area from the entrance to the old Midland Station at the bottom of Spital Hill to the 12 O'clock (junction of Saville Street East and Attercliffe Road).

That's what R E Leader says....almost verbatim :)

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That's what R E Leader says....almost verbatim :)

All good then :blink:

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There was an incendiary explosion at the home of J. Fisher, scythe maker, of Pinglehead 1st April 1854.

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Not an April Fools - where was Pinglehead ???

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There was an incendiary explosion at the home of J. Fisher, scythe maker, of Pinglehead 1st April 1854.

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Not an April Fools - where was Pinglehead ???

Pinglehead is off Millhouses Ln, left hand side going up from Abbeydale Rd, Just before Whirlowdale Cres

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Great work ! Thanks.

How how Donkeydangler Drive ?

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How how Donkeydangler Drive ?
Be serious? have you had a drink or two he he

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Pinglehead is off Millhouses Ln, left hand side going up from Abbeydale Rd, Just before Whirlowdale Cres

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I agree with you here Stuart.

Many years ago when I did my teacher training to be a secondary school teacher we had to do so many weeks in both infant and junior schools first with the younger kids.

Sheffield Polytechnic (as it was then) education department sent me to PINGLE ROAD INFANT & JUNIOR SCHOOL

To get there, without my own transport at the time you had to get a bus (number 17 I think but bus man will know) to Millhouses Park / Millhouses Terminus and then just walk a short distance up Pingle Road to the school, exactly the location you have pinpointed.

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Be serious? have you had a drink or two he he

Not when posted, but, I bet you stopped and thought about - just for a second ... lol

I'm way too historically serious most of the time, just letting the remnants of my hair down ...

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Pinglehead is off Millhouses Ln, left hand side going up from Abbeydale Rd, Just before Whirlowdale Cres

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gramps will be along in a minute with one of his old maps he he

Looks like it was an old farm, - peculiar name though....wonder what the history is ?

Update: According to A.H. Smith, pingel='enclosure' and the first recorded instance for this location was in 1612.

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Port Mahon encompassed the area around the bottom of St Philips Road/ Netherthorpe Road (Pooort Mee-on) about opposite where the petrol station is now

Quite right. Here's an extract from an article I wrote for The Sheffield Philatelist:

The name Portmahon (also found as Port Mahon or Port-Mahon) does not appear on modern maps of Sheffield, and few people are familiar with it as a locality. The name applied to a small area in the Netherthorpe district, behind the old Royal Infirmary near St Philip's Road, and it can be found on older Sheffield street maps. There was a Baptist chapel known as Portmahon Chapel, built in 1839, which stood near the present Medico-Legal Centre in Watery Street, and which was demolished in the 1960s. The name 'Watery Street' refers to the stream (once spanned by the long-gone Portmahon Bridge) which came down the valley from Crookes, but which since the early 1800s has run through an underground culvert before emptying into the River Don.

Originally, Portmahon was the name of a short street which ran in a westward curve from the junction of St Philip's Road and Upperthorpe Road. It apparently acquired its unusual name in the 18th century, when on two occasions the British fleet captured Mahon, the largest town on the island of Menorca. The street was evidently first laid out during a wave of patriotism that swept the country after one of these naval victories**. Portmahon was later extended south-westwards, but the extension had the name Watery Lane ... Sometime in the 1890s the name Watery Lane began to apply to the whole street, and so the name Portmahon disappeared as a street name, but it was still used for the adjacent district. The whole area was redeveloped in the 1960s, when Watery Lane disappeared completely, its site now being part of a recreation ground. It is interesting to note what was told me by an old friend, whose grandmother lived in the Netherthorpe area. She always pronounced the place-name 'Poort may-ON', with the emphasis on the last syllable. This is similar to the Spanish pronunciation of 'Ma-HON', unlike, for example, the Irish surname 'MAH-on'.

** See the book Crossin' O'er by the late S. Roy Davey

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gramps will be along in a minute with one of his old maps he he

Looks like it was an old farm, - peculiar name though....wonder what the history is ?

Update: According to A.H. Smith, pingel='enclosure' and the first recorded instance for this location was in 1612.

Pingle was quite a common field name . There are or were 4 in the upper part of the Porter Valley.

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Pingle was quite a common field name . There are or were 4 in the upper part of the Porter Valley.

But in one case two adjacent fields with the same name so probably a field divided. Apart from that cluster in the Porter valley there are only three other instances in Harrison's Survey, - in Birley Carr, Grenoside and Wooley Grange; and the name isn't common in the field name listings in A.H Smith's Place Names of the West Riding.

Anyway - I was hoping somebody might have an idea about the origin/significance of name. Why would you call a field, or a homestead, 'Pingle' ?

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Brocco ?

I know where this was, does anyone else ?

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Brocco ?

I know where this was, does anyone else ?

Somewhere near Hunters Bar ?

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But in one case two adjacent fields with the same name so probably a field divided. Apart from that cluster in the Porter valley there are only three other instances in Harrison's Survey, - in Birley Carr, Grenoside and Wooley Grange; and the name isn't common in the field name listings in A.H Smith's Place Names of the West Riding.

Anyway - I was hoping somebody might have an idea about the origin/significance of name. Why would you call a field, or a homestead, 'Pingle' ?

According to John Field in his dictionary of English field names, it means a small piece of land, from the Middle English pingel, and he quotes 29 examples, many in Cheshire but others from all over England.

While Harrison's survey is a fabulous resource, it does only cover the estates of one landowner, albeit extensive, and is by no means comprehensive.

Likewise Smith's list is confined to the West Riding. Perhaps I should have said 'a common name in England' Gramps!

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Somewhere near Hunters Bar ?

Fraid not.

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