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Where were the following districts of Sheffield please


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SteveHB

Are you working from memory or Google Earth evidence Steve? If the latter I see what you mean, small estate built on what could very well be a large carpark, with one older stone built building?

A slight memory blockage, due to being under the influence back in the 70's :)

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RichardB

Yellow Lion bows out with a roar.

If you've got to go - how better to make your exit ... sadly, many more to disappear ere long ...

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ukelele lady

Yellow Lion bows out with a roar.

http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/yellow_lion_bows_out_with_a_roar_1_316779

Thank you syrup. . . So now we know.

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No, neither Apperknowle nor Unstone are in Sheffield.

Both are only just outside, south of Sheffield, in Derbyshire and both carry Sheffield postcode addresses (S18)

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RichardB

No, neither Apperknowle nor Unstone are in Sheffield.

I started this Pub-thing off and even I don't know what should and should not be included. It used to be Derbyshire ! It's S18, what about S57 ? I don't even know how high "S" postcodes go, Brighton for all I know - it was a "stab in the dark" - publish and see what happens - constructive critisism hopefully -there was also the date issue, Sheffield in 1823 was a bit different to Sheffie;d in 1937 ...

Not a critisism, just a comment from the originator of this thread; I've never heard of some of these places ...

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ukelele lady

I started this Pub-thing off and even I don't know what should and should not be included. It used to be Derbyshire ! It's S18, what about S57 ? I don't even know how high "S" postcodes go, Brighton for all I know - it was a "stab in the dark" - publish and see what happens - constructive critisism hopefully -there was also the date issue, Sheffield in 1823 was a bit different to Sheffie;d in 1937 ...

Not a critisism, just a comment from the originator of this thread; I've never heard of some of these places ...

Don't fret Richard, there 's a list of names coming up for the Yellow Lion of . . . . where?er must keep of that wine.

Oh. . Apperknowle Unstone or something. :blink:

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A new name from Sheffield Indexers

Ward, Godfrey ( Yellow Lion).

Residing at Apperknowle, in 1871.

Recorded in: Whites Sheffield & District Directory - 1871.

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RichardB

Bottoms

Alfred Unwin, Tilter &c., Bottoms, Upper Hallam (1849)

all the information I have.

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SteveHB

Where abouts on't 'cliffe was southern st anyone?

Attercliffe Common to 350 Bright Street.

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Guest MikeB

Hollow Meadows - this one has me beat :( mind you, High Hazels had me bamboozled also !

I know of High Hazels and your and your friend defines it as I knew it .

Parkwood Springs was always recognised as being bordered by Wallace road ; Parkwood road and Douglas road .

Bardwell road and Parkwood road were outside the area . Indeed , the old Manchester line down by the railway bridge to

Parkwood road was the old Neepsend railway station - hence the " station steps " and not the railway steps . The old landfill site was known as the Shirecliffe tip . The land between Douglas road and Rutland road was known simply as Parkwood .

The " Springs " as they were known was because of the freshwater springs which ran from Parkwoods and formed ponds at the side of Douglas road which were abound with water life . Most of the year water ran down Douglas road , but more so during rainy

weather .

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Guest MikeB

A memory jogger, entrance to Parkwood Springs

mikeb 08.05.11

I can remember this view as I passed it regularly . I can assure you that it never looked as - one can only say - as beautiful as that . I remember it as a black , dirty , grime ridden bridge with water running down the middle of the road regularly .

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ukelele lady

mikeb 08.05.11

I can remember this view as I passed it regularly . I can assure you that it never looked as - one can only say - as beautiful as that . I remember it as a black , dirty , grime ridden bridge with water running down the middle of the road regularly .

It doesn't look like that anymore, I drove through it on Monday and it looks very grotty.

Each time I drive through there I think " camera ", I must remember it next time.

Each time I go up there I try to picture how it was but it is very difficult because everything is so over grown.

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Guest MikeB

Question - Jews Lane - I havn't lived in Sheffield for over 30 years . Don't know if it is still there - was just off the Moor below Debenhams .

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James Makin and Son, Table fork and bayonet manufacturer, Pickle (1811)

Samuel Harmar & Co., Iron Founders, 34 Pickle (1822)

George Makin, Bill distributer &c., Pickle (1833)

Pickle...

Wicker/Spital Hill area (in 1822) :)

more than that I cannot say

Hugh

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Jerusalem ?

Those who maintain the truth of the tradition on which this legend is founded, have not succeeded in advancing such grounds for their belief as are altogether satisfactory or convincing.*. Of course the route taken by the retreating army is well known, and it is necessary, therefore, in order to give any colour of likelihood to the assertions that are made, to suppose that the Prince came incognito.

But then the question arises with what object could he come here at such a time ? It is said that he was entertained at the house of Mr. Heaton, in what was long afterwards known as " The Pickle"-a name applied to the district in Saville street, between the entrance to the Midland Station and the Twelve o'Clock bar.

A little on the town side of the Twelve o'Clock was " Jerusalem. "

Pickle House, where Mr. Heaton lived, still stood within the memory of persons now living. It was on the site now occupied by the steel works of Mr. Hobson.

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Nice one Syrup, I'd forget my own head etc etc ...

http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/index.php?/topic/6962-sheffield-in-the-mid-1700s-a-glimpse/page__hl__jerusalem

Those who maintain the truth of the tradition on which this legend is founded, have not succeeded in advancing such grounds for their belief as are altogether satisfactory or convincing.*. Of course the route taken by the retreating army is well known, and it is necessary, therefore, in order to give any colour of likelihood to the assertions that are made, to suppose that the Prince came incognito.

But then the question arises with what object could he come here at such a time ? It is said that he was entertained at the house of Mr. Heaton, in what was long afterwards known as " The Pickle"-a name applied to the district in Saville street, between the entrance to the Midland Station and the Twelve o'Clock bar.

A little on the town side of the Twelve o'Clock was " Jerusalem. "

Pickle House, where Mr. Heaton lived, still stood within the memory of persons now living. It was on the site now occupied by the steel works of Mr. Hobson.

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Jerusalem ?

Jerusalem in Sheffield?

Interesting one!

If "those feet in ancient times walked upon ENGLANDS pastures green" according to the song "Jerusalem", as opposed to a place in the Middle East / Judea / Palestine / Israel / the Holy Land then where exactly in England were they?

Could it have been Sheffield?

Even without a hole in the road are we the holiest of holy Cities?

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