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Where were the following districts of Sheffield please


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Another yard to locate; I can't picture the location myself and I know the answer !!!

Moderators, please PM me your answer; I know you can find 'em, just setting a poser for people.

Onion's Yard (1820's)

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Trippet's Yard (1820's)

I knew this one !

Just so no-one shoots themselves in the foot - it is NOT on Trippet Lane.

This one passes the cricket ball test - even the wife could hit this place from the Cathedral, sorry, Parish Church.

Bonus kipper flavoured ice-cream if you can tell me where is was (obviously) AND what new name it took.

---------------

Moderators please PM answer.

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Tim's Yard/Timm's Yard

I've got two "Street" names for this one (1830's) but basically the same place.

"Street" written in that way is meant to be something of a clue ... a visitor to Sheffield these days would consider this to be very central indeed, not quite a cricket ball throw from the Parish Church but ... even I could walk from the Church to here in under 3 minutes (make that an hour if the wife is on my arm ...)

Moderators please PM answers.

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I don't have and answer to this one (or indeed a clue) therefore, I'm providing all the information I know.

Ralph Brown, Gardener, Strawberry Hall, Hop Yard (White's 1833)

Could be outlying/Rotherham/The Moon for all I know.

Open to all, since I don't know the answer.

It is/was in Sheffield

Sheffield F.C.'s first ground was at Strawberry Hall Lane, Park

---------------

Depledge William, gardener, Strawberry hall lane

(A directory of the borough and parish of sheffield, 1852)

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It is/was in Sheffield

Sheffield F.C.'s first ground was at Strawberry Hall Lane, Park

---------------

Depledge William, gardener, Strawberry hall lane

(A directory of the borough and parish of sheffield, 1852)

You are a better man than me, Gungadin !

--------------------

Me Dad used to say that; what's all that about then ?

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You are a better man than me, Gungadin !

--------------------

Me Dad used to say that; what's all that about then ?

Gunga Din, Rudyard Kiplin

See last line

You may talk o' gin and beer

When you're quartered safe out 'ere,

An' you're sent to penny-fights an' Aldershot it;

But when it comes to slaughter

You will do your work on water,

An' you'll lick the bloomin' boots of 'im that's got it.

Now in Injia's sunny clime,

Where I used to spend my time

A-servin' of 'Er Majesty the Queen,

Of all them blackfaced crew

The finest man I knew

Was our regimental bhisti, Gunga Din.

He was "Din! Din! Din!

You limpin' lump o' brick-dust, Gunga Din!

Hi! slippery "hitherao"!

Water, get it! "Panee lao"! [bring water swiftly.]

You squidgy-nosed old idol, Gunga Din."

The uniform 'e wore

Was nothin' much before,

An' rather less than 'arf o' that be'ind,

For a piece o' twisty rag

An' a goatskin water-bag

Was all the field-equipment 'e could find.

When the sweatin' troop-train lay

In a sidin' through the day,

Where the 'eat would make your bloomin' eyebrows crawl,

We shouted "Harry By!" [Mr. Atkins's equivalent for "O brother."]

Till our throats were bricky-dry,

Then we wopped 'im 'cause 'e couldn't serve us all.

It was "Din! Din! Din!

You 'eathen, where the mischief 'ave you been?

You put some "juldee" in it [be quick.]

Or I'll "marrow" you this minute [Hit you.]

If you don't fill up my helmet, Gunga Din!"

'E would dot an' carry one

Till the longest day was done;

An' 'e didn't seem to know the use o' fear.

If we charged or broke or cut,

You could bet your bloomin' nut,

'E'd be waitin' fifty paces right flank rear.

With 'is "mussick" on 'is back, [Water-skin.]

'E would skip with our attack,

An' watch us till the bugles made "Retire",

An' for all 'is dirty 'ide

'E was white, clear white, inside

When 'e went to tend the wounded under fire!

It was "Din! Din! Din!"

With the bullets kickin' dust-spots on the green.

When the cartridges ran out,

You could hear the front-files shout,

"Hi! ammunition-mules an' Gunga Din!"

I shan't forgit the night

When I dropped be'ind the fight

With a bullet where my belt-plate should 'a' been.

I was chokin' mad with thirst,

An' the man that spied me first

Was our good old grinnin', gruntin' Gunga Din.

'E lifted up my 'ead,

An' he plugged me where I bled,

An' 'e guv me 'arf-a-pint o' water-green:

It was crawlin' and it stunk,

But of all the drinks I've drunk,

I'm gratefullest to one from Gunga Din.

It was "Din! Din! Din!

'Ere's a beggar with a bullet through 'is spleen;

'E's chawin' up the ground,

An' 'e's kickin' all around:

For Gawd's sake git the water, Gunga Din!"

'E carried me away

To where a dooli lay,

An' a bullet come an' drilled the beggar clean.

'E put me safe inside,

An' just before 'e died,

"I 'ope you liked your drink", sez Gunga Din.

So I'll meet 'im later on

At the place where 'e is gone --

Where it's always double drill and no canteen;

'E'll be squattin' on the coals

Givin' drink to poor damned souls,

An' I'll get a swig in hell from Gunga Din!

Yes, Din! Din! Din!

You Lazarushian-leather Gunga Din!

Though I've belted you and flayed you,

By the livin' Gawd that made you,

You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!

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Strawberry Hall Lane,

Queens Rd to Duchess Road.

Cheers Steve and Thank you. Still never heard of it, I'll hide behind the "it's not my end of town" statement.

Nice to learn a bit though.

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Tim's Yard/Timm's Yard

I've got two "Street" names for this one (1830's) but basically the same place.

"Street" written in that way is meant to be something of a clue ... a visitor to Sheffield these days would consider this to be very central indeed, not quite a cricket ball throw from the Parish Church but ... even I could walk from the Church to here in under 3 minutes (make that an hour if the wife is on my arm ...)

Moderators please PM answers.

Vox PM'd an answer - different to mine, very different and four years apart from my answer = could be the same person moving from ? to Lee Croft ... gave me a chance to ring Vox and wind him up a bit he he

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1895

Arthur Abson, glass cutter.

Court 4, 2 Strawberry Hall Lane &

Cyprus Works, Mary Street, Sheffield.

--------------------------------------------------

White's 1901

40 Thomas Johnson, labourer.

42 Arthur Dickenson, waiter.

Hy Matthews, timber merchant.

Court 2, 2 William Slack, shopkeeper.

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It is/was in Sheffield

Sheffield F.C.'s first ground was at Strawberry Hall Lane, Park

---------------

Depledge William, gardener, Strawberry hall lane

(A directory of the borough and parish of sheffield, 1852)

Vox...do you have a date for that reference to the football ground ? Strawberry Hall lane would have been roughly on the line of Olive Grove road, which is just in the making on the 1905 map.

On Fairbank's 1795 map and the 1850 OS map it was just a track into the fields which became a footpath up to Heeley Green. No buildings shown on Fairbank's map and only those at the junction with Duchess (formerly Lead Mill) road appear on Tayler's map of 1832 and the 1850 map (as per the photo posted by Steve...great find BTW !!) There seem to be extensive gardens around these buildings so perhaps 'Ralph Brown, Gardener' and successors were famous for their strawberries.

The Strawberry Gardens mentioned elswewhere in the thread were in Ecclesall Bierlow but the eastern boundary for that was Bramall lane - I suspect these were in the Millhouses area.

Srawberry Hall lane 1850s

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Vox...do you have a date for that reference to the football ground ? Strawberry Hall lane would have been roughly on the line of Olive Grove road, which is just in the making on the 1905 map.

On Fairbank's 1795 map and the 1850 OS map it was just a track into the fields which became a footpath up to Heeley Green. No buildings shown on Fairbank's map and only those at the junction with Duchess (formerly Lead Mill) road appear on Tayler's map of 1832 and the 1850 map (as per the photo posted by Steve...great find BTW !!) There seem to be extensive gardens around these buildings so perhaps 'Ralph Brown, Gardener' and successors were famous for their strawberries.

The Strawberry Gardens mentioned elswewhere in the thread were in Ecclesall Bierlow but the eastern boundary for that was Bramall lane - I suspect these were in the Millhouses area.

Srawberry Hall lane 1850s

Here you are Gramps

The info is from Wiki

These are two extracts with the relevant bits in Bold type .

In 1855, members of a Sheffield cricket club organised informal kick-abouts without any official rules. Nathaniel Creswick and William Prest formed the Sheffield Football Club.

The inaugural meeting of Sheffield F.C. took place on 24 October 1857 at Parkfield House in the suburb of Highfield. The original headquarters was a greenhouse on East Bank Road lent by Thomas Asline Ward, father of the first club president Frederick Ward, and the adjacent field was used as their first playing ground. ----------------------

----------------------- Sheffield club have played at a number of grounds around Sheffield. Initially they played at Strawberry Hall Lane Park. However, like all of the early grounds they played at, it wasn't owned by the club. In the following years they would play at Newhall Athletic ground, Old Forge ground and a ground near Hunters Bar on Ecclesall Road --------------

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Open to all because I don't know the answer.

1822, Richard Brown, Cow keeper, Nicholson's Yard, Crook's Loft.

No ideas - anyone ?

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Did you know the Broomhead Hall was taken down piece by piece

and shipped to America to be rebuilt?

Do you have any details regarding the demolition and shipping to America of Broomhead Hall? Was it rebuilt, if so, where?

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Do you have any details regarding the demolition and shipping to America of Broomhead Hall? Was it rebuilt, if so, where?

Someone else wondered that as well.

Before I left England (to settle in the USA in 1991) I took some of my

children to see the family mansion, Broomhead Hall about 20 miles west

of Sheffield, Yorkshire. This was a beautiful old building (and land) that

had been in the family since the year 1200, built and rebuilt as the

whims of the occupants, natural disasters and weather took their toll.

I had seen it and have some photos of it somewhere. Much to my surprise

it had disappeared and only the foundation remained. I was somewhat

amused to find out from a local farmer that it had been taken down brick by

brick and shipped to the (yes you guessed it) USA. So somewhere in the USA is

the Rimington Mansion - Broomhead Hall! If anyone knows where it is now,

I would love to know!

Source

Search is on then.

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Do you have any details regarding the demolition and shipping to America of Broomhead Hall? Was it rebuilt, if so, where?

Welcome to Sheffield History "SeeAll"

Hope you enjoy the site and I am sure that some information will be forthcoming with your request for details of Broomhead Hall.

In fact it looks like vox is already onto it.

Do you have a couple of mates called "HearAll" and "SayNowt"? lol

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Nettlesthorp

1818, very central, not a district; more than likely an off-shoot of a "place", lane, row etc etc.

(Passes the cricket ball test, i.e. you could throw a cricket ball at the Parish Church if it wasn't for the buildings inbetween).

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