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Stuart0742

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Its a bit specialised then, the experts know the answer us normal guys are struggling

Speak for yourself Stuart, I'm far from normal

lol

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But...Rotherham trams finished in 1949, the through route being severed in 1948 when the rebuilding of a bridge at Tinsley led to the tracks being taken up and not being replaced, before the Roberts cars were built...

Didn't Rotherham replace their trams with trolley buses for a time to run along the Sheffield Rotherham route, taking their power on the "trolley" from the normal tram lines but having to be modified to use the tram rail as a "return" connection (as trams do) rather than the more usual system for trolley buses of using twin overhead wires (supply and return)?

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Its a bit specialised then, the experts know the answer us normal guys are struggling

1 Tram finished in 1949

1 Tram was new in 1952

Sheffield & Rotherham, its got to be Tinsley then :)

501 was the prototype for the Roberts class (502-536), and was built at Queens Road in 1946. It's first trial run was on 11th July 1946, before the separation of the Sheffield and Rotherham systems.

The picture is taken at the Templeborough reversing triangle at Temple Street, which was specially constructed so the single ended Rotherham cars could turn here and operate short workings. The photo was taken on 22nd September 1946 (two months after 501 first ran) and it was a Light Rail Transit League tour, cost 3 shillings. The tour started at the LMS Station and ran to Handsworth, then back to Attercliffe and Templeborough, where a change was made to the Rotherham car for a trip to Rotherham and back, Sheffield 501 taking the tour party to many parts of the tram network before returning to the LMS Station.

Too much detail, methinks

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501 was the prototype for the Roberts class (502-536), and was built at Queens Road in 1946. It's first trial run was on 11th July 1946, before the separation of the Sheffield and Rotherham systems.

The picture is taken at the Templeborough reversing triangle at Temple Street, which was specially constructed so the single ended Rotherham cars could turn here and operate short workings. The photo was taken on 22nd September 1946 (two months after 501 first ran) and it was a Light Rail Transit League tour, cost 3 shillings. The tour started at the LMS Station and ran to Handsworth, then back to Attercliffe and Templeborough, where a change was made to the Rotherham car for a trip to Rotherham and back, Sheffield 501 taking the tour party to many parts of the tram network before returning to the LMS Station.

Too much detail, methinks

Not at all. Well done !

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Didn't Rotherham replace their trams with trolley buses for a time to run along the Sheffield Rotherham route, taking their power on the "trolley" from the normal tram lines but having to be modified to use the tram rail as a "return" connection (as trams do) rather than the more usual system for trolley buses of using twin overhead wires (supply and return)?

I don't think Rotherham ever operated trolleybuses beyond Templeborough, although the trailing metal "skate" for use as a return was often used in areas where both trams and trolleybuses ran. It is possible that trials using this method took place, but I have never read of any regular use fo trolleybuses on the route to Sheffield.

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Fantastic, Thanks for that.

In case anyone wonders, I am not old enough to have been on this tour lol.

Although the location was known to me, it just happens that I have a copy of Tramway Review magazine No 207 (September 2006) which contains an article about car 501 and a detailed description of the tour by one of the participants, Mr J C Gillham, a historian and cartographer of high renown in the areas of tramway and railway history.

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This one should be easy.

The crossover at the very top of Parkside Road, almost at the junction with Middlewood Road. The gradient looks a bit steep, which confused me at first. What a fine sight it must have been on match days at Hillsborough, with a long line of trams lined up in Parkide Road! Who cares about the football when there are Sheffield Trams to be seen.

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The crossover at the very top of Parkside Road, almost at the junction with Middlewood Road. The gradient looks a bit steep, which confused me at first. What a fine sight it must have been on match days at Hillsborough, with a long line of trams lined up in Parkide Road! Who cares about the football when there are Sheffield Trams to be seen.

It was the gradient that confused me.

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It was the gradient that confused me.

My recollection of Parkside Road is largely the other end, where the Football Special buses used to run from many years ago. I made it to the other end of Parkside Road less frequently but remembered the school buildings, and my very hazy memory is of a flattish road with a bit of a steep rise at the very end as it joins Middlewood Road. But then memory is a strange thing at times, and it was the school on the left which made me think Parkside Road, confirmed by map 246.

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The crossover at the very top of Parkside Road, almost at the junction with Middlewood Road. The gradient looks a bit steep, which confused me at first. What a fine sight it must have been on match days at Hillsborough, with a long line of trams lined up in Parkide Road! Who cares about the football when there are Sheffield Trams to be seen.

This location is no longer a mystery,

but what's the mini tram thing that seems to be having problems?

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This location is no longer a mystery,

but what's the mini tram thing that seems to be having problems?

Fantastic photograph. Tram 354 is a snowplough - which is why it is out in that weather. I wonder if it has fallen foul of the snow or the pointwork - this junction wasn't used a great deal. It was originally single deck car 46, built in 1899, and converted to a snowplough in 1921. It survived until 1960 and is now at Crich, restored to it's original condition. http://www.tramway.co.uk/images/Tram%20Fleet/46.jpg

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Fantastic photograph. Tram 354 is a snowplough - which is why it is out in that weather. I wonder if it has fallen foul of the snow or the pointwork - this junction wasn't used a great deal. It was originally single deck car 46, built in 1899, and converted to a snowplough in 1921. It survived until 1960 and is now at Crich, restored to it's original condition.

Thank you for explaining MA,

the tram being a snowplough had never crossed my mind.

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I don't think Rotherham ever operated trolleybuses beyond Templeborough, although the trailing metal "skate" for use as a return was often used in areas where both trams and trolleybuses ran. It is possible that trials using this method took place, but I have never read of any regular use fo trolleybuses on the route to Sheffield.

Probably was just to Templeborough then.

Seem to remember it was the "skate" they used for the return. Must have been interesting if this ever derailed as it would leave the skate connected directly to the overhead live, and at ground level where it could come into contact with things / people, although I suppose it could easily be isolated just by the driver switching off current to the motor.

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Probably was just to Templeborough then.

Seem to remember it was the "skate" they used for the return. Must have been interesting if this ever derailed as it would leave the skate connected directly to the overhead live, and at ground level where it could come into contact with things / people, although I suppose it could easily be isolated just by the driver switching off current to the motor.

I think the trailing skate was only ever used for trial purposes such as demonstrating the benefits of trolleybuses to sceptical transport committees, or fior testing new trolleybuses arrived in a town before the twin wire overhead was installed or completed. Even in those days regular operation with the skate would be a definite no-no.

Rotherham installed trolleybus wiring to Templeborough in 1940 so through routes could be run to and from Rotherham suburbs to the steel works. I don't seem to be able to pin down the date that the trolleybuses to Templeborough finished, however.

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I think the trailing skate was only ever used for trial purposes such as demonstrating the benefits of trolleybuses to sceptical transport committees, or fior testing new trolleybuses arrived in a town before the twin wire overhead was installed or completed. Even in those days regular operation with the skate would be a definite no-no.

Health and Safety Nazis would have a field day lol

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Where this one?

This one has me puzzzled: tight right hand turn on a falling gradient with a road going striahgt on. If I am seeing it correctly, the stop sign says "Cars to City stop here", but I can think of nowhere with this particular combination. My initial thought was somewhere on the Crookes route, but nothing matches (as far as i can tell), or Handsworth (junction of Richmond Road), but looking at the maps I don't think the road layout is quite right. More searching required, obviously.

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This one has me puzzzled: tight right hand turn on a falling gradient with a road going striahgt on. If I am seeing it correctly, the stop sign says "Cars to City stop here", but I can think of nowhere with this particular combination. My initial thought was somewhere on the Crookes route, but nothing matches (as far as i can tell), or Handsworth (junction of Richmond Road), but looking at the maps I don't think the road layout is quite right. More searching required, obviously.

Barking up the wrong tree, perhaps.

I now think it is Western Bank, looking towards the City. The road heading straight on down the hill is Brook Hill, the tram is about to turn into Hounsfield Road. The single storey buildings in the background and the building on the corner look the same as those seen here:

Top of Hounsfield Road 1

Top of Hounsfield Road 2

Edited by madannie77
fixed broken Picture Sheffield links

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Barking up the wrong tree, perhaps.

I now think it is Western Bank, looking towards the City. The road heading straight on down the hill is Brook Hill, the tram is about to turn into Hounsfield Road. The single storey buildings in the background and the building on the corner look the same as those seen here:

http://www.picturesheffield.com/jpgh/s13838.jpg

http://www.picturesheffield.com/jpgh/y01251.jpg

That looks right, its the same location again that is confusing me

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That looks right, its the same location again that is confusing me

What was confusing me was not being able to see the tram tracks which went along Winter Street - off to the left in this picture, so I was not lokoing for a junction. I have never seen a tram photo taken from this viewpoint before, which didn't help.

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Top of Hounsfield Road, with Western Bank and the line to Broomhill and Crookes going off to the left, lots of trams on the Walkley route and a man who looks like a pointsman walking back to his little shelter. Doesn't look like this anymore!

A bit like 20 questions

Am I right in thinking this will Western Bank just before the Winter St Hounsfield Rd junction

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A bit like 20 questions

Am I right in thinking this will Western Bank just before the Winter St Hounsfield Rd junction

I can't imagine it is anywhere else, this time looking up Western Bank from the Hounsfield Road junction, as you say.

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I can't imagine it is anywhere else, this time looking up Western Bank from the Hounsfield Road junction, as you say.

The buildings behind the tram look quite smart, a pity they were demolished

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