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Stuart0742

Tram Locations

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Poor old vox, he`s obviously not as old as he makes out to be [lucky ###]. The road between Greenhow Street and Highton Street was widened in the 50s. This involved taking away most of the frontage of the church and I think so much of the ajoining houses front gardens. W/E.

So what I want now is the width of tram lines please so I can work out how much wider it is. Unless you know that as well W.E.

I just caused a stir on South Road by measuring the road and pavements. I parked the van up, opened the back doors, looked official, and everything stopped for me. lol

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So what I want now is the width of tram lines please so I can work out how much wider it is. Unless you know that as well W.E.

I just caused a stir on South Road by measuring the road and pavements. I parked the van up, opened the back doors, looked official, and everything stopped for me. lol

Sheffield's tramways ran on standard gauge i.e 4 feet 8 and a half inches.

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Sheffield's tramways ran on standard gauge i.e 4 feet 8 and a half inches.

It's about 6 ft wider then. :)

PS. 4ft 81/2" - Now there's a nice "round number" How on earth did anybody come up with that idea? :o

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It's about 6 ft wider then. :)

PS. 4ft 81/2" - Now there's a nice "round number" How on earth did anybody come up with that idea? :o

I was lead to believe it was the width of standard Roman Chariot wheels, don't know if that is true

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I was lead to believe it was the width of standard Roman Chariot wheels, don't know if that is true

Probably an urban myth, Georger Stephenson when building the Stockton and Darlington Railway copied the gauge of a local colliery line at 4'8" then everybody else copied him, later widened by half an inch.

Well not everybody, IKB had his own ideas

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---- copied the gauge of a local colliery line at 4'8" then everybody else copied him, later widened by half an inch.

Conversation.

A/ Why on earth do our trains keep falling over?

B/ The rails aren't wide enough apart. 4' 8" is too narrow.

A/ We'd better make them all wider then.

B/ O.K. - 1/2" should do it.

:)

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Conversation.

A/ Why on earth do our trains keep falling over?

B/ The rails aren't wide enough apart. 4' 8" is too narrow.

A/ We'd better make them all wider then.

B/ O.K. - 1/2" should do it.

:)

I think on the GWR Brunel had the same conversation with his team of engineers , but in their case they decided that 7 foot should do it.

It worked, but it was no longer compatible with any other line anywhere in the world.

Brunel had invented the rail equivalent of the betamax video tape! lol

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I think on the GWR Brunel had the same conversation with his team of engineers , but in their case they decided that 7 foot should do it.

It worked, but it was no longer compatible with any other line anywhere in the world.

Brunel had invented the rail equivalent of the betamax video tape! lol

Seven foot gauge sounds quite sensible and easy to work with. It is therefore a pity that the gauge used by the Great Western and it's allies was actually 7 foot and 1/4 inch! Like the Betamax, it was probably better than the opposition but lost out by being outnumbered.

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Seven foot gauge sounds quite sensible and easy to work with. It is therefore a pity that the gauge used by the Great Western and it's allies was actually 7 foot and 1/4 inch! Like the Betamax, it was probably better than the opposition but lost out by being outnumbered.

Well it worked on the GWR, Brunel was a brilliant engineer and there are those who say that the GWR (Gods Wonderful Railway) was the best by far of any railway in Britain.

Perhaps the problem was getting other railway companies to convert to 7 foot gauge?

After all it would involve a major financial outlay and they already had the standard gauge in place which did after all work perfectly well.

It's perhaps the same argument as to why Britain won't convert roads to driving on the right like the rest of Europe and most of the World and has its own system (a British driver would doubtless say BETTER system) of driving on the left

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Back to Tram pictures :)

What do we know about this one, if a photo of South Rd Walkley leads to Brunels Broad Gauge, what will this on bring

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Back to Tram pictures :)

What do we know about this one, if a photo of South Rd Walkley leads to Brunels Broad Gauge, what will this on bring

Penistone Road/ Infirmary Road junction, looking down Shalesmoor towards the City. Standard gauge.

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Penistone Road/ Infirmary Road junction, looking down Shalesmoor towards the City. Standard gauge.

A bit more information: Must have been taken before 27th March 1954 when the line to Middlewood closed. The property on the left, 328 Shalesmoor with signs for J Kitchen, is listed in the 1919 White's directory as being the Midland Railway Goods Office! The Ship Inn, one of the few buildings remaining in the area, is directly behind the tram (all this assumes my location is correct)

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A bit more information: Must have been taken before 27th March 1954 when the line to Middlewood closed. The property on the left, 328 Shalesmoor with signs for J Kitchen, is listed in the 1919 White's directory as being the Midland Railway Goods Office! The Ship Inn, one of the few buildings remaining in the area, is directly behind the tram (all this assumes my location is correct)

I think that The Ship Inn is just off the picture to the left. Just off the picture to the right is The Nags Head and a little further down the road towards the city centre on the left is The Acorn.

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I think that The Ship Inn is just off the picture to the left. Just off the picture to the right is The Nags Head and a little further down the road towards the city centre on the left is The Acorn.

Here's one with The Ship Inn on it,

is that Hoyle St on the right?

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Here's one with The Ship Inn on it,

is that Hoyle St on the right?

Have cleaned mi specs, can see better nah!!!

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I think that The Ship Inn is just off the picture to the left. Just off the picture to the right is The Nags Head and a little further down the road towards the city centre on the left is The Acorn.

Comparing the photo with Map 29 suggests the Ship Inn is behind the tram. The tram is right on the junction of the Penistone Road and Infiirmary Road routes, which means the road to the left is Dun Street and the building on the corner is no 328 Shalesmoor. The Ship Inn is at the other end of the block (no 312 Shalesmoor by this time, according to the Pubs list), and it seems likely that the corner of this building can be seen behind the tram.

EDIT

Looks like SteveHB got there before me, obviously whilst I was typing (slowly) my reply.

Edited by madannie77

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Here's one with The Ship Inn on it,

is that Hoyle St on the right?

Thats a fine shot, with the tram, bus and coach, as well as the adverts - might look good on the transport calendar.

Certainly is Hoyle Street on the right.

Edited by madannie77

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Thats a fine shot, with the tram, bus and coach,a s well as the adverts - might look good on the transport calendar.

Certainly is Hoyle Street on the right.

Thank's MA,

it's a pitty but that image isn't a high enough resolution for the calendar

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Thank's MA,

it's a pitty but that image isn't a high enough resolution for the calendar

Never mind - at least I can enjoy looking at it & all the other splendid photos on the Forum.

We are (as far as I am aware) still stumped by the location of the picture posted here. Time to bring it back for another look, perhaps?

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Never mind - at least I can enjoy looking at it & all the other splendid photos on the Forum.

We are (as far as I am aware) still stumped by the location of the picture posted here. Time to bring it back for another look, perhaps?

Here you go a bit more modern

As if by magic it appears, no fairies involved lol

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Not my picture but one of a tram on Abbeydale Road with the Abbeydale Cinema in background in the centre.Maybe someone has a modern day shot to add to it.

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Not my picture but one of a tram on Abbeydale Road with the Abbeydale Cinema in background in the centre.Maybe someone has a modern day shot to add to it.

Hi abcman

Good location for a then & now, do you have a better quality copy of this photo?

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Here you go a bit more modern

As if by magic it appears, no fairies involved

Got it!

Attercliffe Road between the junctions with Old Hall Road and Kirkbridge Road. The building in the background is the B & C Co-op at the top of Kirkbridge Road. Map 176 has it all. I would think the picture is taken from the junction of Attercliffe Road and Clay Street.

The Co-op can be seen in the background of this picture from Picture Sheffield.

Edited by madannie77
repaired broken Picture Sheffield link

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Having just had a look on Google Street View, it should make a very interesting then and now.

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