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Dickdioxide

Crookes Valley Road- The embankment.

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Are these maps of any interest?

I'd forgotten that I had them although they are not of good quality.

All 1889. . .and too big

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They certainly show the rounded ends of Harcourt Road just as Andy said.

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They certainly show the rounded ends of Harcourt Road just as Andy said.

The other end of Harcourt Road, i think now Harcourt Crescent, still has the arch shape which it makes sense would have been replicated at the other end. I come from Brighton which has many 'Crescents' dating from the early to mid 19th century and appear to have been fashionable at that time. I agree with my friend Mr.1702 that it does appear to have originated in that shape. The whole area is interesting!

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They certainly show the rounded ends of Harcourt Road just as Andy said.

And Great Dam Road right along the side of the lake before the high embankment was put in.

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On the other map I saw the north east end of Harcourt Road was a perfect semi-circle, just like the South West end. Ie it wasn't shaped to go around the extension to the church. So I'm wondering if something odd happened at the church end?

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Harcourt Road 1888-92

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My late grandfather said he had a yard on Mushroom Lane when he started out as a plumber @1929.There doesn't appear to be any dwellings on said road...

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My late grandfather said he had a yard on Mushroom Lane when he started out as a plumber @1929.There doesn't appear to be any dwellings on said road...

Mushroom Lane is very old (older than most of it's surroundings) so there may have been many changes over the years.

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Mushroom Lane is very old (older than most of it's surroundings) so there may have been many changes over the years.

1925 directory.

Mushroom Lane from St. Stephen's Road (Fawcett Street), to Summer Street & Winter Street,

numbers 25 - 105.

Even numbers: St. Stephen's Road >> 24 - 368, with 368 being near to Western Bank.

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Mushroom Lane is very old (older than most of it's surroundings) so there may have been many changes over the years.

I should have realised it crossed over Crookes Valley Road.

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Godfrey Dam was certainly still there in the late fifties, early sixties because I always made a point of having a look through the railings after a visit to the Charles Clifford Clinic (nasty) or a trip around the museum (nice in those days but one visit was more than enough now it's been "modernised").

As I remember it, the Godfrey dam was surrounded by thick vegetation and looked very forbidding, the water level was very low.

Looking on O.S. maps both dams were still there in 1967, but the playing fields are shown on the 1976 map.

We went to live in Crookes in 1973 and I can remember that by that time the playing fields were under construction.

HD

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Interesting thread. I remember my grandfather (born 1892) telling me that the embankment was being built when he was at school, and that all the dustcarts went there to dump their rubbish, thus gradually building up the embankment. If this were to enable trams to run to Walkley, then it would have been completed by 1899 which is when the service began. The thought occurred to me that anyone digging deep into the embankment now might find some highly collectible Victorian bottles etc!

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1900 - ‎Snippet view only

Since my last Report the tipping of Street Sweepings has practically ceased at Crookes Valley Road. This place has been our best means of disposal for many years past, and the loss of it was keenly felt. It was necessary that some other place ...

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Brace yourselves, bit of Transport information incoming from the most unlikely of sources, me !

The tram was the number 17.

Remarkable stuff.

Interesting thread. I remember my grandfather (born 1892) telling me that the embankment was being built when he was at school, and that all the dustcarts went there to dump their rubbish, thus gradually building up the embankment. If this were to enable trams to run to Walkley, then it would have been completed by 1899 which is when the service began. The thought occurred to me that anyone digging deep into the embankment now might find some highly collectible Victorian bottles etc!

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Route from 1897 - it says.

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1900 - ‎Snippet view only

Since my last Report the tipping of Street Sweepings has practically ceased at Crookes Valley Road. This place has been our best means of disposal for many years past, and the loss of it was keenly felt. It was necessary that some other place ...

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Potential electric eel incident in 1898.

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£12,000 was sanctioned in 1893 for the works at Crookes Valley Road; they were back for more in 1891.

Pointless link

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Brace yourselves, bit of Transport information incoming from the most unlikely of sources, me !

The tram was the number 17.

Remarkable stuff.

Route from 1897 - it says.

The number 17 being the number of the proposed tramway in the Sheffield Corporation Act 1897.

From the London Gazette of 24th November 1896, page 6540:

"Tramway No. 17, commencing in Leavygreave (as proposed to be widened), by a junction with Tramway No. 13 at a point 1 1/2 chains or thereabouts south of Western Bank, and passing thence into and along Western Bank, Winter Street, Mushroom Lane, Crookes Valley Road, Crookesmoor Road,

Barber Road, Commonside, Spring Vale Road, Howard Hill, Howard Road, Hadfield Street, and South Road, and terminating in South Road at a point 1/2 a chain or thereabouts south of Walkley Road."

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Some snippets from local newspapers

Tip opened 2nd June 1885

11th January 1886 The Improvements Committee decide to call the road between Winter Street and Crookesmoor side "Crookes Valley road"

Sheffield Daily Telegraph 10th August 1886

Advert:

" Free Tip

New Crookes Valley Road

Tip now open at Canada Road

The Corporation of Sheffield GIVE NOTICE that

they are still prepared to receive Good, Hard, Dry RUBBISH (not

being of inflammable or offensive nature), for the Formation

of the above Road.

The "Tip" can now be approached by the way of Canada

road (off St Stephen's Road) as well as at Harcourt Road"

The same advert appears a month earlier but access is from Harcourt Road, Bromley Street, Fawcett Street and Winter Street

Sheffield Independent 13th October 1887

by 13th October 1887 135 000 loads of rubbish deposited there

220 000 cubic yards

1891 widened from 40' to 45' costing £5000

26th July 1911 Tramways Committee consider deputation who suggest Hoyle Street, Meadow Street, Portmahon, Upperthorpe Road, Oxford Street, Crookes Valley Road as a route.

11th September 1911 Tramways Committee consider an alternative Upperthorpe Tram route considered from Infirmary Road, Albert Terrace Road, Oxford Street into Crookes Valley Road opposite Harcourt Road

10th November 1913 Tramways Committee again considering but reply that a bus now operates ( since 26th October 1913)

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Seems like the name " tip " stuck for a very long time.

We kids always called it the tip, O tha playing ont tip.

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