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Sheffield Victoria Train Station


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I am wondering if they had to apply for planning permission to demolish what was left of the station? The reason being there's nothing on the planning register of Sheffield Council about it. The buildings were cleared away in the 1980's, so presumably there would have been some debate on it?

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As this was railway property on railway land there was probably no need. The building if the hotel extension over the cleared area might have been different though.

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3 hours ago, Lemmy117 said:

As this was railway property on railway land there was probably no need. The building if the hotel extension over the cleared area might have been different though.

The hotel extension is on the Planning register along with the car parking and several other bits connected with the approach road. Still I am surprised that Network Rail could have gotten away with demolishing the buildings without someone saying something.

Has anyone seen any newspaper reports on the final demolition?

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I would assume that the only time any discussions on demolition would be required would be if the building was listed, and as far as I am aware Victoria was not. I must say I only used it a few times, usually for day excursions when I was a kid, but I always found it dark and dreary, and there didn't seem much to warrant it's retention.

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I know that years ago Government could do whatever they wanted with their property. Out of "courtesy" they would sometimes inform the local planning authorities.

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Sheffield City Council produced several long term strategic plans during the 1930s, and several of these make reference to the construction of a single, joint railway station, which would have been built roughly where the Corn Exchange did stand, and the Parkway roundabout does stand.

The exact location did seem to change a little bit between plans, but it seems that the general intention was to relocate to somewhere roughly equidistant between the Midland and Victoria Stations.

I have never seen any cost projections for this ambitious project, and I have no information as to why it was never progressed, although I suspect that the commencement of WWII must have been one reason. Funding, post depression, may also have been a contributory factor.

That said, I can't see that Sheffield City Council would have produced such comprehensive plans without some measure of consultation with both, the L. M. &. S. R. and the L. &. N. E. R.

 

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The late, at some time Councillor. Geoff Chapman was producing a comprehensive account of planning proposals for the City that never materialised....from a floating heliport  to a new railway station. Its title would have been..."Sheffield ...the City that never was". Sadly, Geoff died before his "tome" could be published but I recall reading a draft which detailed the station proposal. After his death his work in progress seems to have vanished.

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4 hours ago, lysandernovo said:

The late, at some time Councillor. Geoff Chapman was producing a comprehensive account of planning proposals for the City that never materialised....from a floating heliport  to a new railway station. Its title would have been..."Sheffield ...the City that never was". Sadly, Geoff died before his "tome" could be published but I recall reading a draft which detailed the station proposal. After his death his work in progress seems to have vanished.

Copies of these published Sheffield City Council planning proposals used to be available, on shelf, in the Local Studies Library, where ever that happens to be located these days.

It's where I first came across them.

Most contained actual plans of the proposed new station, how it connected into the existing network, and artists impressions of the new facilities. 

I assume that these still exist.

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Railway ticket front and back that I got off E-Bay recently. Looks like the date issued was 18 November 1952.

 

Victoria to Darnall Ticket.jpg

Victoria to Darnall Ticket rear.jpg

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19 hours ago, History dude said:

Railway ticket front and back that I got off E-Bay recently. Looks like the date issued was 18 November 1952.

 

Victoria to Darnall Ticket.jpg

 

Not been clipped. You should try and get a refund.

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4 hours ago, Unitedite Returns said:

Not been clipped. You should try and get a refund.

lol

Yes, just take it along to the Vic. booking office.

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9 hours ago, Athy said:

lol

Yes, just take it along to the Vic. booking office.

I think I might hold onto it. You never know I could get a train one day to Victoria. There is a bit of platform left there, I saw it on those walk videos.

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Well, Darnall station is apparently still open, though as Wiki says it's the least used station in South Yorkshire, its future may be in doubt.

   Oh, to walk round the nearby engine shed and see all those grimy, monstrous O4s again.....

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Where did you find that picture? Plus is their a date for it?

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1 hour ago, History dude said:

Where did you find that picture? Plus is their a date for it?

 


It was on Twitter today

Sadly no date for it

I'm honestly obsessed by this train station - don't know why either I just love it!

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At a guess, I would date that around the 1960's.

That's judging from the taxi and the shape of the car roofs.

I miss it too and was a regular visitor in the 1950's and a bit less so in the 60's.

The dinners in the staff canteen were delicious, priced at one shilling (5p) and pudding for sixpence.

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On 24/05/2022 at 08:26, Organgrinder said:

At a guess, I would date that around the 1960's.

That's judging from the taxi and the shape of the car roofs.

 

 

Yes, the taxi is an Austin FX4, which was introduced in either 1959 or 1960. It's an early example: note the indicators mounted on the roof like ears. These were soon replaced by indicators built into the front and rear wings.

When did British Railways become British Rail?

I wonder what Turton and Sons got up to in their murky premises.

 

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I don't suppose that the station signs were replaced immediately, but that narrows the probable date down from about 1960 to about 1966.

 

Something else I've just noticed: what was the purpose of the walkway or platform which goes alongside thje arched wall?

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18 hours ago, Athy said:

I don't suppose that the station signs were replaced immediately, but that narrows the probable date down from about 1960 to about 1966.

 

Something else I've just noticed: what was the purpose of the walkway or platform which goes alongside the arched wall?

I have a picture from 1969 in colour of the front and the sign was never replaced.

On the arched wall thing do you mean the long one that runs the entire length of the wall?  If you do I don't think it was something you could walk on, just the end of the arch section. Then the wall of the slope rests on it. I suppose it acts as a foundation base for the wall. Rather than build direct to the stone of the arches.

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On 25/05/2022 at 16:52, Athy said:

Something else I've just noticed: what was the purpose of the walkway or platform which goes alongside thje arched wall?

It's a sailing course or oversailing course. The projecting stonework with a mortar fillet on top provides an inclined surface to help throw water clear of the wall face.

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Those "Green" street lights shown on Furnival Road where they designed for the old tram system? If anyone knows anything about them, who made them, any plans showing dimensions I would be very interested to know. 

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The trams never went down Furnival Road, so those lamp posts are not tram traction poles. They were steel poles that were much thinner but were fed by overhead wires like on the tram routes. I seem to remember them being removed in the early 1970's.

 I don't know exactly who made Sheffield's traction poles, but I remember an advert for Stewart's and Lloyd's which included mention of tramway poles. As regards plans, you could try the National Tramway museum at Crich, they have an extensive library and probably have manufacturers details.

I do know they were a b****r to remove when we came to replace them. In the tramway days some had so much load on them because of the overhead that they were strengthend by filling them with concrete. Most had to be burned off just below ground level, they were planted in some seriously strong concrete!

Nigel L

 

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