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Sheffield Victoria Train Station

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Old rider

The electrification of the Woodhead line was proposed by Sir Nigel Gresley before WW2 but was delayed by the war. Sir Nigel Gresley built the first electric engine in 1939 ready for the electrification and as a result it was used on the Dutch railways after the liberation of Holland as Dutch railways were electrified at 1500 volt D.C. On its return to the UK it was named Tommy to comemerate the engine's war service.

As a point of interest the Great Central line was built to the continental Berne loading gauge that is wider and higher than the British loading gauge. If Beeching had not closed the Great Central continental wagons of goods could reach as far north as Yorkshire via the Channel Tunnel without transhipment and our exports could travel to anywhere in Europe by rail. Some years ago it was proposed to re-open the Great Central for this reason but it was decided to be too expensive.

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History dude

Picture 1 is the approach to the station taken in 1937. 

2 is the top end from 1948 and picture 3.

Picture 4 shows the turntable also 1948

Victoria station approach from air 1937.jpg

Victoria 1948.jpg

Sheffield Victoria 1948.jpg

Sheffield Victoria 1 1948.jpg

 

By the way the white lines are crop marks for photo editing purposes.

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southside

During the lockdown i'm using up the time by reading once again my collection of books about Sheffield.

In the Pevsner Architectural guide to Sheffield by Ruth Harman and John Minnie, it tells me the Wicker arch is 72ft wide and the viaduct has forty archers and is 660 yards long(a fact i didn't know).  From where does the first arch start and the last one finnish?

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tozzin
15 hours ago, southside said:

During the lockdown i'm using up the time by reading once again my collection of books about Sheffield.

In the Pevsner Architectural guide to Sheffield by Ruth Harman and John Minnie, it tells me the Wicker arch is 72ft wide and the viaduct has forty archers and is 660 yards long(a fact i didn't know).  From where does the first arch start and the last one finnish?

And supposedly bales of wool were placed at the base of the arches to absorb the vibrations of the trains, true or false I can’t be sure.

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lysandernovo

The "arches" start immediately east of the old Bridgehouses station .

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southside

This William Ibbitt panorama painted in 1855! looking over the City towards Victoria Station, clearly shows some of the railway arches and also those on the approach up to the Station. The painting is titled South East View of Sheffield from Park Hill, is that assumption correct? 

 

Looking Towards Victoria Station.jpg

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lysandernovo

It seems to be in the right direction and I imagine Mr Ibbit knew what he was painting.

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History dude

That view would be from Sky Edge would it not?

Some the chimneys look a bit too tall to me. Especially the one on the far right edge, plus the one back of the embankment to the station. 

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Sheffield History

Screenshot 2020-04-17 at 22.02.08.jpg

There are some interesting features when zoomed in

I'd love to know what that structure is on the right hand side that looks like some kind of giant fencing held up by struts?

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Edmund

I think that the structure you're looking at is the pit head tower for the Sheffield Colliery. Below is a higher resolution version of the picture. It was completed in 1855 and there was another picture "taken" from the same spot 20 years later - St Johns churchyard, Park Hill.

1251578139_SheffieldfromSouthEast_large.thumb.png.aad1f5df95de6b89b00e3f862ee75bd4.png

 

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southside
3 hours ago, Edmund said:

I think that the structure you're looking at is the pit head tower for the Sheffield Colliery. Below is a higher resolution version of the picture. It was completed in 1855 and there was another picture "taken" from the same spot 20 years later - St Johns churchyard, Park Hill.

1251578139_SheffieldfromSouthEast_large.thumb.png.aad1f5df95de6b89b00e3f862ee75bd4.png

 

Here's the now Edmund, Looking over towards Victoria Station from St John's from Bing Maps.

Victoria Station Bing.jpg

Victoria Station Bing 2.jpg

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MartinR

I've been looking at a blow up of the picture.  The structure has small wheels at the top and if you look over at the two stacks slightly right there is another gantry carrying a wheel.  I think Edmund is right, this is the top of the downcast shaft used for haulage.  Of the two stacks across the horse tramway the left hand one appears to be on its own, I suspect that was the upcast shaft and the gantry will be emergency access.  The right hand stack of the two has a building attached and that may be where the winding engine was housed.  At this date the normal way to ventilate a colliery was by having a furnace at the bottom of a shaft which heated the air and caused an updraught.  Not suprisingly this was called the "upcast" pit or shaft.  The let air into the colliery a downcast shaft was required.  Men and materials travelled through the downcast in the fresh air, not in the hot, poisonous gasses of the upcast.

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History dude

I think there is something wrong with the colour of the 1855 picture. I suspect that the blue colour the artist as used has deteriorated over time, given it a sand colour. I can't really believe that the entire sky was the same colour as the ground. And the water in the canal is also sand. Where buildings really salmon pink? The fields over the other side might have been a brighter green originally. Those smoky tall chimneys might have stood out a bit more with a some blue sky around them too.   

So Sheffield might not have been as grotty as the painting suggest.

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Voldy

This was the list of exhibits at a one day event celebrating the Centenary of the Manchester, Ashton under Lyne and Sheffield Railway at Sheffield Victoria Station on 21st December 1945.  With the end of WW2 the LNER were already building new locomotives to restore their plans for electrification of the line and replace a very run-down fleet as a result of the war. I remember travelling during the war from Sheffield to Darlington by train changing at Doncaster to join a 17 coach long A4 hauled train which had to draw-up twice, it was packed with servicemen.

The only photo which might be relevant to the display at Sheffield is the one by A G Ellis in the livery it carried in December 1945. The other picture is presumably the 1946 re-paint in LNER green. Film was difficult to obtain in those days !

hpqscan0003.thumb.jpg.3032ea9f22953b8be29f6bc949440c00.jpg828106657_Scan_20200419(2).thumb.jpg.6a489491c5cb55c4f172826d3eaae0f0.jpg2131899135_Scan_20200419(3).thumb.jpg.df2bc047a7f6e4522eda0cbd0350bbc1.jpg

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lysandernovo

Thanks for the list...As an old "spotter"( in more ways than one)  I have to say in the early/mid 1950s I never saw a class L1 at Victoria although B1s were "ten a penny"...especially "Chamois" as were the CoCo electrics after the opening of the electrified line to Manchester.

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Sheffield History

 

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Sheffield History

9EEEAAED-7D41-4B2A-A0C8-3DF4FF454D8A.png.3a9e06bdcb69a5437935a813d4b84d27.png

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Sheffield History

Screenshot 2020-05-13 at 14.34.54.jpg
The Wicker entrance to Sheffield Victoria Train Station

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Sheffield History

Screenshot 2020-05-14 at 09.09.25.jpg

Closing Day 5th January 1970, Engine Driver W. Hibberd of Rotherwood Electric Depot on Victoria Station Platform.

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Sheffield History

Screenshot 2020-05-19 at 08.39.35.jpg

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Sheffield History

100470958_3611705762189300_2167075068306259968_n.jpg

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SteveHB

royal vic_bus.jpg

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Sheffield History


I wish I was a dab hand at creating 3d models
I'd definitely do the Victoria Train station

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SteveHB
6 hours ago, Sheffield History said:


I wish I was a dab hand at creating 3d models
I'd definitely do the Victoria Train station

The first tutorial is 45 minutes long lol

 

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History dude
13 hours ago, Sheffield History said:


I wish I was a dab hand at creating 3d models
I'd definitely do the Victoria Train station

I am working on that too.

Some of the things I have put together are on Pinterest

Sheffield Victoria Model and design

I was also able to get some plans of the building. But I can't post them as they were drafted by someone on a Model Railway forum and when I bought them from him there was a condition not to post them online. 

 

Some people find blender easy to use. However I find the software very hard, especially if you are use to Desk Top Publishing or 2d drawing software. Blender does things just the opposite to these software packages.

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