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Firth Park Grammar School...


Guest kubernaut

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Guest kubernaut

I joined this excellent Web site last night and have already spent several interesting hours perusing the many topics on Sheffield's recent history. It's been a fascinating look back and I thank Neil for administering the wealth of information on the site.

As an ex-pupil of Sheffield's Firth Park Grammar School (pupil from 1965 - 1970) I set up a school site some years back. We've been slowly building up details of the building, teachers, pupils and school life over about five years and are always glad to receive information and photos from anyone who was once a pupil at the Grammar School or the later Firth Park School from 1970 onwards.

Contact details are at: https://firthparkgrammarschool.wordpress.com/. for anyone has anything to submit or if you just want to have a little look around to see what went on there all those decades back!

We're always happy to hear from you - Steve

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Welcome to the site Kubernaaut and hope you will be a regular visitor. I went to Firth Park via the amalgamation with Hatfield Comprhensive and was at the "Brushes" between 1970 -72 so we probably crossed paths at some point. I have visited your site and was very impressed with it. Keep up the good work.

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Guest kubernaut

Welcome to the site Kubernaaut and hope you will be a regular visitor. I went to Firth Park via the amalgamation with Hatfield Comprhensive and was at the "Brushes" between 1970 -72 so we probably crossed paths at some point. I have visited your site and was very impressed with it. Keep up the good work.

Many thanks, Mick. The intake of pupils after the Brushes ceased to be is rather loathed to write anything about Firth Park School after it ceased to be a grammar school. I'd be glad to add something on the FPGS site if you'd care to write something.

As far as our paths crossing, I guess that you started school in September 1970 just as I was starting working for a living... in the Sheffield Trustee Savings Bank, 102 Surrey Strret. It was more like a glorified post office in those days... I think that the building (listed, I believe) is still in existence although I'm not sure whether it is still a bank. Perhaps someone could confirm this, and maybe even send me a photo of it as it is today. However, not to worry as I'll probably look the place over (as I shall the City Centre) on one of my infrequent trips to the UK and to the Shiny Sheff. My next planned visit is for mid-November this year.

Steve

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  • 6 months later...
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My older brother went to FPGS from about 1950. We lived about 100 metres from the school gates in Horninglow Road and he was always late for school! His nemesis was Mr Chapman, the Headmaster, a real martinet by all accounts.

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My older brother went to FPGS from about 1950. We lived about 100 metres from the school gates in Horninglow Road and he was always late for school! His nemesis was Mr Chapman, the Headmaster, a real martinet by all accounts.

I always thought Chapman was OK, although I think he left in my second year. His successor was Mr Wilson. Now there was a brute!

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Waterside Echo

Welcome to the forum! I was a pupil at FPGS from 1957 to 1964.

Did you know Andrew Taylor? He was a pupil there from 1955, his dad was the manager of Sheffield Wednesday. W/E.

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Did you know Andrew Taylor? He was a pupil there from 1955, his dad was the manager of Sheffield Wednesday. W/E.

I don't think so. There were a couple of Taylors in my year but Andrew doesn't ring a bell. But then, it was a long time ago!

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dunsbyowl1867

Did you know Andrew Taylor? He was a pupil there from 1955, his dad was the manager of Sheffield Wednesday. W/E.

Was that as in Eric Taylor W/E?

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I was at Firth Park Grammar from 1954 until 1959...Eric Taylor's son was a year or so younger than I... but, because of his father, well known...if not a little notorious. I was also a member of the Old Boys Association for a few years...We were known not as 'Firth Parkers' but rather as ' Firparnians'...which was also the title of the school magazine..on which I had occasion to do some research a few years ago.

A splendid school with several very notable old boys...one of whom ( Gerald Brooke) was caught by the Russians spying and exchanged for a real Russian spy! :)

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A splendid school with several very notable old boys...one of whom ( Gerald Brooke) was caught by the Russians spying and exchanged for a real Russian spy! :)

I always understood that FPGS was one of only a handful of schools at the time that taught Russian. I wonder how it came about?

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Boris Haywood was the Russian Master and during the chilliest parts of the Cold War delegations of Russians were shown around the school...As a young '***' in the 'Special Choir' I remember singing a selection of English songs to a bunch of hard looking Russians ...who returned the favour by singing ( in Russian) the Volga Boat Song. I have no idea how it became the only school outside of London to teach the language.

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Boris Haywood was the Russian Master and during the chilliest parts of the Cold War delegations of Russians were shown around the school...As a young 'fag' in the 'Special Choir' I remember singing a selection of English songs to a bunch of hard looking Russians ...who returned the favour by singing ( in Russian) the Volga Boat Song. I have no idea how it became the only school outside of London to teach the language.

Anyone got a copy of Spike Johnson's book about the history of the place? I wonder if it's in there?

Don't know if you've seen this, 1926, FPGS at extreme left. Almost didn't recognise it, no Art block!Is that part of the garden or the footings for the labs?

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Yes, I have a copy of Spike's little book and, No, it isn't mentioned as far as I can recollect. The aerial shot is of the development of the Brushes and allied Council estates and shows the 'Oval' quite nicely. FPSS( it became FPGS somewhat later) moved from its first home in Abbeyfield to the Brushes which had been the German steel entrepreneur ,Kayser's, home. It was he who had the tower built ( to remind him of home) and it was he who said, when asked why a German had made his home in Sheffield..." Home is where one does well"...and he did really well!

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Continuing malicious attacks on FPGS sites lead to Kubernaut's  discontinuation of his sterling work on making this the success it deserved to be. There were many photographs and articles which I have been unable to locate again, in addition the advancing years sadly means fewer 'Old Boys' are posting. If it helps to generate interest here is a Form 1K photo taken in 1947.

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lysandernovo

Interesting how back in 1947 1 Kings had lads in open necked shirts and how some of them were wearing sports coats ( with one having a badge sewn on) and long trousers!....Presumably, this was on account of immediate post War austerity. Back in 1954 when I was a "*ag" in 1 Foch full uniforms were compulsory( as was wearing short trousers) and Prefects were on hand looking for infringements (  not wearing the silly cap was one favourite) By then, our Council were making financial grants toward the uniform and such items as aprons and PT gear.

Sorry to hear that the FPGS dedicated site has been "vandalised"

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1946/47 was the first year of the 'House' forms which related to 1st and 2nd year, thereafter forms kept the more familiar A, B, C, D titles. Walt Padfield was the Headmaster, he retired at the end of that school year. Dr Chapman followed and as soon as clothes rationing ended in 1949 he set out rules concerning uniforms which included caps (up to and including 4th year pupils), these took effect from September 1949. Unfortunately Wartime austerities were to continue, food rationing until the Spring of 1952. 

The last NUJMB School Certificate Examinations were held in 1950, the 'O' and 'A' level grade examinations commenced the following year.

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