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Bricklayers Labourer in steel works?


liqnov
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Hi Everyone,

With the release of the 1921 Census I have discovered that my GG Grandfather worked at Cammell Laird, Grimesthorpe as a 'Bricklayers Labourer'. As this was primerily a steel producing factory and munitions during WW1, I am a little perplexed why they would need bricklayers? Can anyone help please Also, where exactly would the factory be today.

 

1921 Employment.jpg

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6 hours ago, liqnov said:

Hi Everyone,

With the release of the 1921 Census I have discovered that my GG Grandfather worked at Cammell Laird, Grimesthorpe as a 'Bricklayers Labourer'. As this was primerily a steel producing factory and munitions during WW1, I am a little perplexed why they would need bricklayers? Can anyone help please Also, where exactly would the factory be today.

 

 

To the best of my knowledge, the munitions factory was in the area of Petre Street (Adsetts Street), Upwell Street and Carlisle Street East. Named here as Cyclops Works (sping & buffer dept).

Edit: 'munitions' added.

Cy_wks.jpg

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=17&lat=53.40615&lon=-1.43541&layers=168&right=BingHyb

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Camel Laird became post WW1 a constituent part of English Steel Corporation. …Both my grandfather and great grandfather worked there. Both were highly skilled pattern makers . Grandfather was a trade unionist and found himself ,more often than not ,being the first to be discharged and last to be employed….such were the vagaries of employment during the dreadful years of depression.

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My Great Uncle, James May worked as a Machine File Cutter for  Cammell Laird (also courtesy of the 1921 Census) so thank you for the factory location information.

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1 minute ago, AnnB said:

My Great Uncle, James May worked as a Machine File Cutter for  Cammell Laird (also courtesy of the 1921 Census) so thank you for the factory location information.

I think Cammell Laird had a number of departments in Sheffield, other than the shell department mentioned in this topic.

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Yes they did. …armour plate, files, forging, castings, springs, rails, railway axles, railway tyres etc.They also had a steelworks in Penistone and they also built ships at Birkenhead.

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Cammell Laird & Co. Limited, steel manufrs., (East forge), Savile Street East. 1911 & 1925
Cammell Laird & Co. Limited, steel manufrs., Carlisle Street. 1911 & 1925

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The sad thing about our heritage is that Sheffield’s steel barons left so little for the City in the way of civic buildings…unlike those in Liverpool, Manchester and, sad to say, Leeds. They made their money here…spent as little as they could locally and then vanished, by and large, to more pleasant climes….or am I being a tad cynical?😋

 

 

 

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Thank you to everyone who replied. I never thought of the fact that they used furnaces so as such would need bricklayers, but makes perfect sense. Sadly the archive for Cammell Laird held in Wirral Archive holds very little information concerning Sheffield men & women who worked there. Lots of info to be going on with. Many thanks

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One of the reasons for Sheffield becoming a centre for steel making was the availability, locally, of clays suitable for turning into refractory bricks ….as used in furnaces…..Another loss of employment following the demise of steel were the specialised companies making refractory bricks, cements etc…..including one small outfit for which I was a director.

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Back in the 1960's whilst at University I had a summer job with a contractor working as a brickies labourer relining the furnaces, mainly at Steel Peech and Tozer. The furnaces were shut off for Works Week and we started work the following day. The reheating furnaces were still hot enough to melt rubber soled boots and we worked in pairs and could only stay in for a very short time before being pulled out and another pair sent in. Our job was to knock the bricks lining the walls onto the floor and the they were subsequently tossed out.  Once cleared our job was to keep the brickies supplied with bricks. We worked 12 hour shifts but the rate of pay was top dollar and three weeks work would keep me all summer. No Health and Safety in those days.!! The worst job was relining the Electric Arc Furnaces. Prior to the bricks being lined, a bed of dolomite powder was prepared. This came as a fine powder and had to be packed using a cube of concrete on a rod. Every time the block came down the dust would puther up in your face - no face masks only handkerchiefs. As the Ganger in charge of us would frequently tell us "This is the University of Life"

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