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Head Squares and Pinnys


tozzin
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I will always remember seeing my mother wearing a “ pinny “ when she was at home, she wore always a wrap round pinafore doing the washing, cleaning, cooking and baking, all of the women I knew as a child wore the same type of pinny, this was from my earliest recollections from the late forties up to the sixties, my mother continued to wear one right up to her death in the seventies and when she went shopping her pinny was left at home but she and other women married or unmarried always wore a head scarf , an important piece of fashion at the time and again this item has been consigned to the memories I still rely on, these head squares / scarves could be cheap or expensive only my mothers purse decided whether hers were cotton or silk, god bless her.

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Head scarves ,often worn as a “turban” ,together with  a “pinny” were the daily garb of Mum and Granny in the 1940/50s.Mum wore hers less as we went into the 60s….I suppose this was on account of improving standards of living..

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This time of year brings back fond memories of going caroling with my mate on Christmas Eve, coming home to the smell of bakeing, seeing mum standing at the kitchen table in her pinny rolling out pastry for the mince pies she was making, dad would always retreat to the White Swan for a pint on Christmas Eve.

Didn't have a pinny!  though my wife did buy me an apron for our first Christmas in 71, with the wording I'm the best cook in this house and I've got my wife's permission to say so,  didn't have a turban but i did have a flat cap!😊

 

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Greetings tozzin. Yes! unless we had 'Guests', Mum always had her pinny on. She had several

folded up in the linen cupboard, always printed floral cotton ones, with a little pocket she

had a hanky in. She had a selection of Head Scarves, though usually worn round her neck, but

pulled off and put on her head if it became windy or was raining.

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Happy memories Heartshome, I don’t think I ever saw my mother without her pinny in the house, I seem to recall the other mums near me wore either a wrap round or an tie back apron, seems they had to protect their clothes from the daily splashes from their home running life, todays lifestyle enables women not to bother about whatever residue and splashes landed on them, get changed and throw them in the washer that’s now the order of the day, my mothers wash day was Saturday as that was the only day she didn’t work.

Times certainly have changed, washing done any day of the week by using the timer programme on the washers.

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Talking of clothing, old street/town photos always show people looking really smart with gents wearing suits and bowler hats, and the women wearing dresses and frilly hats etc. Even the typical working men always seem to wear shirts.

Did they dress this way all the time, or just when they went out? Was it a sense of wanting to impress others and feeling proud, or were there simply no other types of clothes to wear? When and why did standards change to where we are today where folk wear anything they want? 

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34 minutes ago, LeadFarmer said:

Talking of clothing, old street/town photos always show people looking really smart with gents wearing suits and bowler hats, and the women wearing dresses and frilly hats etc. Even the typical working men always seem to wear shirts.

Did they dress this way all the time, or just when they went out? Was it a sense of wanting to impress others and feeling proud, or were there simply no other types of clothes to wear? When and why did standards change to where we are today where folk wear anything they want? 

I remember Gran & Grandad always 'Dressing Up' nice, even to go to the old folks concert night at the school. Got photos

of them on OAP Club Coach Trips, where they were ALL dressed up. The gentlemen in Suits, and the Ladies in nice coats and

hats. Think it was the 'thing' back then, if you went out somewhere you scrubbed up well and wore your Sunday Best.

Grandad had several suits, never remember him going out without a shirt & tie on. Gran had several ladies suits, and lots of

pretty floral dresses she wore in the summer, always had a brooch on as well. NEVER saw her in a Head Scarfe only hats. 

I think when they went 'out' you dressed to be proud of who you were, outside of the working environment or an OAP.  

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Many steelworkers wore their best, neatly ironed, bleached white ,sweat towel around their necks …like a cravat when they went to t’club.

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The two gentlemen in the photo I posted always wore a tie to work, the chap on the left was Mr Cyril "Curly" Longmore and the small chap on the right was Mr Harold "Snuffy" Sommers sadly Harold was found drowned in the canal basin a few years ago.

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