Jump to content

Watch this - how much has Shalesmoor changed just in your lifetime?


Sheffield History
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, LeadFarmer said:

Anyone know how the little lane called Copula got it's name?

No idea, but Cupola Street on Shalesmoor appears to date back to around 1825.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, tozzin said:

Could be that it had a couple of bell shaped kilns there, like the one on Doncaster Street.

You could be right, the dictionary says..

Cupola

(also cupola furnace) a cylindrical furnace for refining metals, with openings at the bottom for blowing in air and originally with a dome leading to a chimney above.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the business supplies firms that we used to go to when doing the community newspaper Manor Mercury in the early 1980's is still operating, which surprised me. But other places have gone. The Tropical Marine Fish place has gone, plus I couldn't see the small Hobbies shop that was up there. 

Curious that the old conical chimney is gated and locked up. Another of those historical things that Sheffield Council pretends to care about, but doesn't do anything with.

Will those empty spaces become even more student accommodation I wonder?   

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, History dude said:

One of the business supplies firms that we used to go to when doing the community newspaper Manor Mercury in the early 1980's is still operating, which surprised me. But other places have gone. The Tropical Marine Fish place has gone, plus I couldn't see the small Hobbies shop that was up there. 

Curious that the old conical chimney is gated and locked up. Another of those historical things that Sheffield Council pretends to care about, but doesn't do anything with.

Will those empty spaces become even more student accommodation I wonder?   

I used to visit the Aquarist when I had tropical fish, so many different species of fish, tropical, marine and cold water, I also have fond memories of the Hobby shop that relocated there from St Paul’s Parade, seems popular shops were being pushed further from the city centre, the old music hall albeit non functioning for years but the building had a historical importance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, History dude said:

One of the business supplies firms that we used to go to when doing the community newspaper Manor Mercury in the early 1980's is still operating, which surprised me. But other places have gone. The Tropical Marine Fish place has gone, plus I couldn't see the small Hobbies shop that was up there. 

Curious that the old conical chimney is gated and locked up. Another of those historical things that Sheffield Council pretends to care about, but doesn't do anything with.

Will those empty spaces become even more student accommodation I wonder?   

This was cleaned up by Wilson's demolition back in the 70's, looks like it hasn't been looked after since, it had dozens of old jack knives dumped in it bigger than normal perhaps a failed project for the army they were too big to fit in any pocket.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, neddy said:

This was cleaned up by Wilson's demolition back in the 70's, looks like it hasn't been looked after since, it had dozens of old jack knives dumped in it bigger than normal perhaps a failed project for the army they were too big to fit in any pocket.

Apparently looked after by Kelham Island museum now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Lemmy117 said:

Apparently looked after by Kelham Island museum now.

Yes there was a notice that said that on the video. You can get the key to look around it from there too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have watched several Sheffield videos and am always amazed at the lack of civic pride. Look at the rubbish strew in the gutters, look at the graffiti on 50% of the buildings, look at the chewing gum on the footpaths indeed look at the footpaths and the general state of disrepair.  Surely a building slated for demolition should be demolished not boarded up and left as a blackboard for graffiti artists for want of a better word.

I have friends in Sheffield (where In was born) who now wont even go into town because of the state of things, the only semblance of cleanliness and pride in this video seems to be outside student housing.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Sportsman on Cambridge Street is now under threat by the council, this old pub shouldn’t be under debate as to whether it should be demolished or preserved, the idiots in the Town Hall have no pride in the history of our buildings whatsoever, all they think about is how much they can make for themselves.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, newdale said:

I have watched several Sheffield videos and am always amazed at the lack of civic pride. Look at the rubbish strew in the gutters, look at the graffiti on 50% of the buildings, look at the chewing gum on the footpaths indeed look at the footpaths and the general state of disrepair.   

 


 

 

 



Everyone - watch this - see if you agree with the post above or not

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sheffield has suffered from many things over the years but I would suggest” a lack of civic pride” is,far off the mark .Sheffield ,according to some authorities, is a green city, a city which figures in the top ten areas in the country in which to live,,, a friendly city and a safe city. It also has one of the lowest disposable incomes per capita…..a legacy of de-industrialisation

What Newdale comments upon can be found in very many  other UK cities….not least being boarded up shops or properties awaiting demolition also being boarded up ….until such time as the developer has finance and tenants lined up.

Stop knocking our City and give some praise /credit where it is due…our roads and paths in the centre are regularly cleaned and litter dropping is NOT unique to Sheffielders….the dirtiest place I have visited in the last 5 years is ,without doubt, our capital…and that is only in parts!😳

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are not going to see rubbish everywhere in a video filmed during the lockdown.  To me the Sheffield City Centre is not a place to go to. It has nothing to offer me. New hotels and restaurants and places for students to hang around is NOT the Sheffield I knew. That had a wide variety of shops, selling loads of different things. Even if I couldn't afford what was in the shop I stilled loved looking around them. There were model shops, record shops, hi-fi and TV stores, DIY shops, loads of butcher's. Plus a verity of stores. I loved going around the Co-Op main site. The Castle Market was super. The meat and fish market was always packed on Saturday. You would come for to a "hammer tea" a large crab that you need a hammer to break up. The spit roast joints in the Market and Co-Op food hall, were not cheap, but a treat. 

The bloke who made the video doesn't get that, perhaps he's a student type that has stayed here, rather than going were there's more work.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How many other uk cities have retained the range of shops and outlets that were familiar to some of us back in the 1940/50s?I suspect very few…if any!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, History dude said:

You are not going to see rubbish everywhere in a video filmed during the lockdown.  To me the Sheffield City Centre is not a place to go to. It has nothing to offer me. New hotels and restaurants and places for students to hang around is NOT the Sheffield I knew. That had a wide variety of shops, selling loads of different things. Even if I couldn't afford what was in the shop I stilled loved looking around them. There were model shops, record shops, hi-fi and TV stores, DIY shops, loads of butcher's. Plus a verity of stores. I loved going around the Co-Op main site. The Castle Market was super. The meat and fish market was always packed on Saturday. You would come for to a "hammer tea" a large crab that you need a hammer to break up. The spit roast joints in the Market and Co-Op food hall, were not cheap, but a treat. 

The bloke who made the video doesn't get that, perhaps he's a student type that has stayed here, rather than going were there's more work.  

100% true, that’s just what I remember and some people seem to think Sheffield ends around a quarter of a mile from the city centre - it doesn’t  the rot continues on the estates but it’s the city centre that get criticised and quite rightly too, but the estates are truly shocking.

As to why the council ignore the beggars, druggies and alcoholics that frequent their doorstep, for get about their “ human rights “ are they human? but what about the rest of us who have the right to wend our merry way without being begged at and swore at. My message to the council is “ Get your finger out “

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even in that video there was man laying down in the street who was homeless.

Unfortunately the social security system creates the problems of homelessness and begging. It doesn't take much to put someone on the street, debt loans, loss of a job, zero hours contracts. The alcoholics on the streets are just the extreme cases. Some of us might work for a boss that is an alcoholic, without even knowing it. The rest of the population of alcoholics are very good at concealing it. As for the drugs that is caused by the eduction culture. It started when the education for young people expanded past the age of 13. At first it was the wealthy children who began suffering from it as they were kept at school longer than 13. But in the 1960's with the school leaving age at 14, it began to grow. New drugs prescribed by the NHS called amphetamines were used to treat weight gain in women. Actually caused by eating too much bread! But the young kids noticed that "mum" was acting like superwoman running around the house like she was on fire. So such drugs were picked up and used for keeping awake at night by the young for dancing. As more drugs were created, people with money were able to exploit the growing youth market which needed them to cope with life. As the school leaving age was increased to 16, even more stress was created from dealing with staying in education and the tests and branding people a failure if they can't get a GSCE.  Stopping young people earning money (after 13) from wages, also meant less jobs. Since young people spend on things that adults don't buy. All the things that make the economies of nations grow.  As the adults are too busy paying the bills. With less jobs the young people found that employers were faced with 200 applicants for each job instead of five. So they needed to see an even higher level of qualifications (exam results), to sort out each of the 200.  That meant that exams were even more important than before. Suddenly it was even necessary to go to college or university to get a job, especially a decent one. And to cope with that kind of pressure young people were needing drugs more and more.  

If you keep young people together after the age at 13. Which is precisely what happens at schools. They feed off one another during a critical time of developments in the personality during the "puberty" process. They learn from each other values and experiences. Not what is being taught by the school, but what the other kids know. The only thing is these are not adult values. So the one thing you don't want them learning is from each other. Now some people blame the parents. But at 13 the human body passes a chemical to the mind of each kid to ignore any authoritative figures IE: the parents who brought them up. The same can apply to a teacher, who in the past has been like a parent to any child.  However with a classroom of 30 to 50 kids and one teacher, the chances are the kids will learn more from the kids than the teacher. The teacher might learn them fractions, but they don't teach about life itself. Even if they do or could it would fall on deaf ears to 90% of the kids. Due to MASSIVE amounts of hormones produced between 13 and 21 this can make young people mentally vulnerable. The school then imposes even more stress on young people, with exams, so when drugs are around these take off the stress along with drink too.  Thus creating a drug and alcohol problem in our modern world. 

To deal with it we need more GP's, but ironically despite all the education and students in Sheffield, there's a MASSIVE shortage of GP's and it will only get worse.      

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What a depressing picture you paint! Fortunately ,the drug culture is still a minority although a growing one.

As a child ,living in a period of strict post war austerity and rationing ,I went to a working class primary-junior school where classes of over 40 was the norm. I believe we were educated in an atmosphere of respect for rules ,for our elders and for our teacher. Certainly bad behaviour wasn’t tolerated. Post 11 I went to a grammar school and ,according to my children and grandchildren ,received a far better education than did they. By the way ,the school leaving age in 1960 was 15 whilst  we grammar school kids left at 16.

In those far off days we all walked into jobs….perhaps our recent culture of joblessness has something to do with the social malaise you perceive.?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I left school at 14 because my birthday fell in the six weeks holiday, September 5th, so the day school resumed I started work, my school was where you started at five years of age and left at fifteen, not unless you passed the 11 + exam, which I didn’t, in fact I or my parents never received notification as to how I had done in the exam.

I would say without fear of contradiction that 80% of the beggars are doing it as a job and have some kind of domicile, some the real homeless are just in need of a good wash and look like they are homeless but after saying that I wouldn’t give them anything, they have families somewhere and they can’t be at odds with them all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I must admit that I wish I had a better education even though when I gained more years on my back, everything seemed so easy for me to understand and remember especially history, I know I could have gained a degree in that subject, not only that but I could watch someone doing a very complicated manual job and I could pick it up in twenty minutes and do it as though I’d been doing it for years.

I can remember laying in my bed at night when I was around ten or eleven staring at the moon and stars and thinking “ I wish mi dad would fix that hole in the roof”.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think people misunderstand what I mean about education culture. It's nothing whatever to do with subjects taught in school. In fact you can learn them at any time in life. What's it's to do with is school life itself. When most people left school at 14 the main part of puberty had not kicked it. It needs a really good diet to work for one thing and in 1950's and 1960's Britain that was not the case with many kids. However a kid leaving school back then would then go through puberty mixing with a broad selection of the population of all ages. However any kid going through puberty at school will not. For most of the day they will be with people of their own age. That's the problem - they do not know anything about life at all. 

And that is the root cause of all the world's troubles. Everything is affected. Marriage, child rearing, moral behaviours, drugs. Questioning everything without the least bit of common sense.  Now don't get me wrong it has some positive effects. Young people have fought those in power on issues like rights, such as black and homosexual ones. Young women wouldn't listen to teachers and said we want to do the same thing as males do. And these days their telling MP's to do something about the environment. This is not coming from the people who sit in the house of lords.

Most of us see puberty as sexual development thing. And while it is that, it's much more about how we develop as people and turn into adults. As I said you can't just learn from your parents. Most of that you do from 0 to 13. But anyone who has anyone aged over 13 living with them will know that they are different from being a child. Plus you cannot tell them what to do. 

The whole thing has affected our cities in the same way. That's why Sheffield is nothing like it was in the 60's and 70's. 

People blame this change on everything other than sending kids to school past 13.  They blamed the war years first. But in the USA they had no bombed out buildings and cities were not touched, yet the speed of change resulting from education culture was faster there. Then they blame TV, but in reality TV was simply reflecting the changes not causing them.  Ultimately they blame the school system. Not sticking to standards and falling grades and bad teachers. And of course parents. 

But the teachers are in many cases not much older than the kids being taught and many go from school to college or university without any real experience of life itself. 

And I would be surprised if you have ever seen any research done on the education culture itself inside any academic institution. After all they are not going to blame what keeps them going for things wrong in the world and tell governments to end compulsory education and introduce a system that feeds all 13+ kids back into the community so that future generations will develop in the right way.  It's like this when man developed from Hunter/Gathers ages ago. Much of the human body became fixed into chemical and hormone reactions that suited the hunter/gathers lifestyle. That included the puberty process. In some cultures the start of it is even marked or celebrated in some way.  But modern humans ignore such things. And out modern lifestyle can control such things. Well it can't!!!

For example if girls hang around males at 14 in school classrooms. The males are producing high levels of Testosterone at this point. So "some" females will become addicted to the stuff. So we see football's wives. But that the good side. The bad side is the violent partner who beats the female.  That's just an example of how the body cannot be controlled by our modern lifestyle. 

 

Anyway I will stick more to what the thread is about from now on. Now you are at least aware of it.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For example if girls hang around males at 14 in school classrooms. The males are producing high levels of Testosterone at this point. So "some" females will become addicted to the stuff. So we see football's wives. But that the good side. The bad side is the violent partner who beats the female.  That's just an example of how the body cannot be controlled by our modern lifestyle. 
 

I always thought the footballers wives was down to money and wealth and that was the only attraction, nothing to do with testosterone, it more like the “ look what I’ve got syndrome “

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a sometime lecturer and father of 2 kids …both of whom are involved in education and themselves married to teachers I find much of what history dude writes contradicts my experience and also that, I suspect, of my offspring and their partners.That said ,everyone in a sensible society has a right to an opinion..and we are “chatting”.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...