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Watson Walk


RichardB
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31 minutes ago, boginspro said:

According to the Street Names of Central Sheffield     "Watson's Walk was called after John Watson of Watson Pass and Company, Silversmiths, who had a workshop in the passage from 1810 to 1825."    ( Before I am corrected please note that I use Watson's here only as a quote from that study guide)

I have the same book but I cant find any reference to Watson, Pass and company or for Mr Pass for that matter, John Watson did have works on Fargate, but the Tontine is much closer to Watson Walk than John Watsons company and looking at the map I would have thought that anyone staying at the Tontine looking for the Washington Works its only natural that James Watson would point them in the right direction and possibly this little passage way could have ended up being called Watsons Walk as it did by-pass the dirty busy High Street. This is all mereley speculation on my part but I think I have a good case.

 

Tontine.jpg

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42 minutes ago, tozzin said:

I have the same book but I cant find any reference to Watson, Pass and company or for Mr Pass for that matter, John Watson did have works on Fargate, but the Tontine is much closer to Watson Walk than John Watsons company and looking at the map I would have thought that anyone staying at the Tontine looking for the Washington Works its only natural that James Watson would point them in the right direction and possibly this little passage way could have ended up being called Watsons Walk as it did by-pass the dirty busy High Street. This is all mereley speculation on my part but I think I have a good case.

 

Tontine.jpg

img114.jpg

I think you're trying to force evidence into a highly questionable conclusion. That is not a shortcut for the suggested route. That is an old, narrow, inconvenient passage. It would be the direction you sent people for brass or to get robbed.

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10 minutes ago, leksand said:

I think your trying to force evidence into a highly questionable conclusion rather. That is not a shortcut for the route you suggest, that is an old, narrow, inconvenient passage. It would be the direction you sent people for brass or to get robbed.

I’m not trying to force anything, I didn’t say it was a shortcut, I said it was a by-pass and as we all know a by-pass usually takes the long way round, but you are suggesting it was a narrow passage , do you know for sure. I hope someone else can come up with Watson & Pass to disprove my theory and that’s all it is Leksand a theory you can believe it or ignore it.

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2 hours ago, tozzin said:

I’m not trying to force anything, I didn’t say it was a shortcut, I said it was a by-pass and as we all know a by-pass usually takes the long way round, but you are suggesting it was a narrow passage , do you know for sure. I hope someone else can come up with Watson & Pass to disprove my theory and that’s all it is Leksand a theory you can believe it or ignore it.

tozzin, I did not suggest that you did claim that it was a shortcut, but the fact that it is not (and indeed would have been highly inconvenient) is perfectly legitimate counter-evidence to your suggestion. In addition, taking that route would be heading straight into the heart of Sheffield's most disreputable areas of the time - surely you are aware of that, aren't you? If you doubt it was narrow, look at the map you have used to support your argument or any number of others (it is the passage to the north of that you have marked). The eastern entry was particularly narrow, whilst the Turf Tavern was a bottleneck and I know that publicans there were called up for permitting/encouraging practice that obstructed the thoroughfare.

If you care to check Baine's 1822 directory of the county of York (it is freely available and readily accessible) then you will find listed the following entry:

Watson John, Pass and Co. - silversmiths and platers, Hartshead.

Now I do not think it unreasonable to conjecture that said property might have had an entry on the passage which subsequently became known as Watson's Walk, do you?

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From here :    http://homepage.eircom.net/~lawed/SILVERSMITHSPART2.htm

On 24th September 1795 on his own account. A larger mark in the same format was registered 17th June 1822 by John Watson & Son.  ln between those dates John Watson senior had been the principal partner in the firm of Watson Pass & Co., his partners in 1818 being Robert Moss, William Pass, John Hancock, William Harwood, Lewis Thomas, Francis Dunn and the executors of John Pass, deceased. There was a partnership change in 1818 and the remaining partners at the dissolution in 1822 were John Watson, John Hancock, William Harwood, Lewis Thomas and the executors of Paul Harwood, deceased.

Watson, Pass & Co. did not enter any silver mark and it may be that the firm was essentially a manufacturer of plated wares. Initially at least that was the case with Watson & Co. There is an undated order of about 1796 to Watson & Co. from their London agent calling for a wide range of mainly plated goods, per catalogue numbers. The silver items in the order were fish trowels, tea pots, caddies, sugar basins and cream ewers. They had established export markets at an early date; in 1798 they were enquiring for shipping dates for goods which they had to forward to Kingston, Jamaica. Other markets were Baltimore, Quebec and Bermuda.

The partnership of John Watson & Co. which succeeded Watson, Pass & Co. may have been the same as John Watson & Son, the partners in 1828 being John Watson, John Watson junior and Thomas Watson. John Watson senior died in 1835 and output of silver does not appear to have continued for very long after that date.

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And from  http://www.silvercollection.it/OLDSHEFFIELDHALLMARKSDH.html

H #59 Watson, Pass & Co (late J.Watson), Hartshead, Sheffield 1811 - Birmingham

 

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I don’t have access to the 1822 directory all I know is there’s no mention of the partnership in the Sheffield 1825 directory. But I still have to ask why should it be named after this Particular Mr Watson and as for the walk on the map leading to the disreputable area, nearly all the areas around Campo Lane were the same and the crofts which was a cauldron of unrest was some distance away, High Street before widening would only allow just two carriages to pass each other with care but I’m still not convinced on the walk. What an experience to be able to go back to live the area and visit the town generally.

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