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On this day.....


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Alan Crutch

On 16th April 1792 a crowd, larger than United's or Wednesday's turned up on Atterciffe Common to enjoy an attraction that would continue to provide enjoyment to Sheffielders for weeks.

More than 40,000 turned up to savour the party atmosphere.

The cause of the celebration? A notorious highwayman Spense Broughton had been hanged at York a couple of days before. He had been convicted of robbing the Sheffield to Rotherham Mail Coach, after staying overnight in Sheffield. His body was brought to the Common where it was hung in a gibbet of chains and remained there until the 1820's. It seems to have been suspended somewhere in the vicinity of Sheffield Arena.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spence_Broughton for more of the story

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Athy

Well, there was nowt worth watching on t'telly at the time.

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DaveJC
19 hours ago, Alan Crutch said:

On 16th April 1792 a crowd, larger than United's or Wednesday's turned up on Atterciffe Common to enjoy an attraction that would continue to provide enjoyment to Sheffielders for weeks.

More than 40,000 turned up to savour the party atmosphere.

The cause of the celebration? A notorious highwayman Spense Broughton had been hanged at York a couple of days before. He had been convicted of robbing the Sheffield to Rotherham Mail Coach, after staying overnight in Sheffield. His body was brought to the Common where it was hung in a gibbet of chains and remained there until the 1820's. It seems to have been suspended somewhere in the vicinity of Sheffield Arena.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spence_Broughton for more of the story

And he had to pay a ten shillings fine.

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Richard Ineson

An interesting incident involving Broughton's skeleton which hung in the gibbet for many years is that some potters who were employed at the famous Rockingham Works at Swinton (1745 -1842) were on their way home after a night drinking in Attercliffe passed by the gibbet and broke off one of Broughton's skeletal hands  which they later used (bone ash is used in the manufacture of porcelain) to make some item of chinaware. This particular piece of china has not been identified as yet but it might still be in existence and the owner may not realise its significance. It would interesting to see it. It may bear an inscription recording the event and Broughton's name and the relevant dates.

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Athy
30 minutes ago, Richard Ineson said:

An interesting incident involving Broughton's skeleton which hung in the gibbet for many years is that some potters who were employed at the famous Rockingham Works at Swinton (1745 -1842) were on their way home after a night drinking in Attercliffe passed by the gibbet and broke off one of Broughton's skeletal hands  which they later used (bone ash is used in the manufacture of porcelain) to make some item of chinaware. This particular piece of china has not been identified as yet but it might still be in existence and the owner may not realise its significance. It would interesting to see it. It may bear an inscription recording the event and Broughton's name and the relevant dates.

Now I know why it's called hand made pottery.

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Alan Crutch
1 hour ago, Athy said:

Now I know why it's called hand made pottery.

Might also explain the expression "Gone to pot"!

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