Jump to content

Local sayings from yesteryear!


Recommended Posts

peterinfrance

Hi Athy

I think you are right about "Loov or Luv) but wasn't "Duck" as in "Eh up duck" used as frequently?

Here are a few more:-

Coil Oil - Coal House

Pull thi sox up - Sharpen/smarten up

Middle fer diddle - Bulls Eye at darts

Link to post
Share on other sites
Edmund

"get thi rags on" = get ready to go out ie clothing.  I believe it comes from the steel works when they were ready for teeming - they wrapped their legs with wet rags.

Link to post
Share on other sites
MartinR

On board the old sailing ships in the mess decks were provided rings or similar into which the hook of a hammock could be inserted.  You still occasionally hear the phrase "sling your hammock" meaning "stow your gear below".  Of course if you didn't like someone you might tell them to "go sling your hook elsewhere", which became shortened to "sling thi' hook".  See Mayne's "The Language of Sailing".

Link to post
Share on other sites
lysandernovo

Another possibility for this, obviously not local , saying dates back to the days of casual labour in our docks when bails of cotton were imported in vast quantities and every dock worker had a hook with which to handle this cargo....When all the jobs for the day were filled the remaining queueing men would be told to "sling your hooks"!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Edmund

An explanation given in Newcastle in 1894 for "sling your hook" was that it was a seafaring phrase derived from the fact that when a block has been slung (ie fastened), it is ready to be hoisted aloft.

A 1948 explanation says that "slinging the hooks" was an expression for lashing the anchors to the cat-heads (protruding beams for raising the anchor and keeping it away from the sides of the ship).  With the anchor (hook) lashed to the cat-head it could be a danger to other ships, so a master taking his vessel into a harbour with the anchor lashed could be fined.  Therefore the anchor would only be lashed (the hook slung) after putting to sea - ie leaving.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/02/2021 at 18:28, peterinfrance said:

Hi Athy

I think you are right about "Loov or Luv) but wasn't "Duck" as in "Eh up duck" used as frequently?

Here are a few more:-

Coil Oil - Coal House

Pull thi sox up - Sharpen/smarten up

Middle fer diddle - Bulls Eye at darts

I think "Dook" was (and is) more Derbyshire.

I remember the others apart from the last one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
lysandernovo

I was born in Sheffield, raised in these parts but spent time in NE Derbyshire....I have always used "duck" whether here or across the border. I think two world wars with MASSIVE military service and much more regional travel has helped mix our local expressions...One from Kent I adopted was...."It's like plaiting fog trying to reason with you"...and that was very true as far as the lady in question was concerned!!😄

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/02/2021 at 16:08, lysandernovo said:

One from Kent I adopted was...."It's like plaiting fog trying to reason with you"...and that was very true as far as the lady in question was concerned!!😄

"Like knitting sand" was a variant, dunno where from though - I have seen it on a canal boat and asked the owner what it meant, and it was similar to what you've said.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Worrall

894309149_WinWordsmith.thumb.jpg.fca3ee147b13e85638ddb8680f995263.jpgHi Athy,

I've not heard 'Like Knitting Sand' or 'Plaiting Fog...' before. When I worked for Derbyhire CC in the early 90's one of my colleagues used to say 'It's Like Knitting Fog!' She was usually referring to the complete nonsense which senior people came out with in meetings. Another expression which came out of those meetings was 'Purposeful Dithering'. I little later on another 'bright spark' came up with 'Bullshit Bingo'. Everytime somebody came out with a nonsense expression in a meeting he would tick a card and then when he had a straight line shout 'House'. Unfortunately none of this stopped the constant flow of 'hot air'!!!

Wazzie Worrall.....1692904955_BullshitPhrases.thumb.jpg.3ac88d6f9d3a47168ee42e1c2631ea82.jpg

Bullshit Bingo Horiz..jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveJC

There appears to be two ways of spelling ‘plaiting/platting’. however with my track record in the area of spelling I have no idea which is correct, I would have chosen the latter, which doesn’t say much for it’s chances. 😉

Link to post
Share on other sites
MartinR

According to the OED, "plait" has the principle meaning of "A single length of hair, straw, rope, etc., made up of three or more interlaced strands" and comes from the Norman-French "pleit" meaning a fold or twisting.  "Plat" on the other hand comes from the Middle English "platte" and has meaning 2 as "To braid, to intertwine; to plait".  "Plat" is however marked as "English regional (northern and midlands)" from around 1800 and then as "English regional (Yorkshire)".  It all seems to come down to whether you pronounce it with a southern long "a", or a northern short "a".

Link to post
Share on other sites
lysandernovo

The lady in question who introduced me to "plaiting fog" was a Maid of Kent!

Link to post
Share on other sites
MartinR

That would make sense, a southern long "a".  I should know, I've been living in exile amongst the heathen men of Kent for over 35 years.  The funny thing is that my son (who was born and brought up east of the Medway) will change his pronunciation of words like "castle" according to whether he is talking to me or his mother!

Link to post
Share on other sites
peterinfrance

Here are more:-

Mardy arse

Wash behind thi lug oils

Daft apeth

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Worrall

Hi Peter, Thanks for those x3 expressions, more stuff for the list!

My Grandmothers who both died in the 60's had loads of expressions, but I can't remember which one said what.

'You're like the Chapus who fell out of the balloon' - You're not in it, part of it... I'd never heard 'Chapus' before or since!

'Never cast a clout until May is out' - Don't get rid of your winter clothes until the beginning of June! When We were kids a clout was pants or knickers, under clothes...

Cheers,

Wazzie Worrall.....

Link to post
Share on other sites
peterinfrance

.......................and some more

 

Flitting    -  moving house

Siling it down  -  raining hard

any more out there?

Link to post
Share on other sites
lysandernovo

"Doing a  moonlight flit"....Leaving without paying rent!

"As thick as pig sh*t!"

Link to post
Share on other sites
lysandernovo

"Never cast a clout 'till May is out" refers to the May blossom and not the month...so I was told by an old, erudite gardner many years ago!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Athy
3 minutes ago, lysandernovo said:

"Never cast a clout 'till May is out" refers to the May blossom and not the month...so I was told by an old, erudite gardner many years ago!

Both interpretations (May blossom is out/ the month of May is over) have their staunch supporters.

Link to post
Share on other sites
SteveHB

Can we keep this clean please!

Two replies removed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
lysandernovo

When looking at the weather...."It's black oer ar Bill's"

Link to post
Share on other sites
History dude
5 hours ago, lysandernovo said:

When looking at the weather...."It's black oer ar Bill's"

My Aunt used to add "mother" at the end of that line. This was odd to me, because her husband was called "Bill" so I used to think it was where his mother lived!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Worrall

My partner's Grandad who orginally came from Staveley had loads of expressions and stories. My favourite expression was to call somebody a 'Warsop'. I Warsop was a person who left doors open. Warsop is also a village in North Nottinghamshire. Having heard him call people a 'Warsop' I imagined a village with no doors on the houses!

I never got to the bottom of the connection between leaving Open Doors and a village Nr Worksop, has anybody else ever heard this expression?

Wazzie Worrall. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...