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Local sayings from yesteryear!


peterinfrance

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13 hours ago, tozzin said:

No I doubt that, I never heard anyone else say it only in my family, my mother told me she did get it fro:her Irish mother in law.

My mam says it . No Irish connection 

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10 hours ago, hackey lad said:

My mam says it . No Irish connection 

Well that’s interesting, in over seventy years I’ve never heard of anyone else using it.

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I say it, I'm from Sheffield but I don't know where I heard it from. I've heard it in Whitby and Edinburgh and my friend said she read it in the James Herriot books so it seems to be a North Yorks and upwards thing...  I live in London now and I never hear it here, I always have to explain it (you'd think I'd stop saying it really). 

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6 hours ago, JoJo said:

I say it, I'm from Sheffield but I don't know where I heard it from. I've heard it in Whitby and Edinburgh and my friend said she read it in the James Herriot books so it seems to be a North Yorks and upwards thing...  I live in London now and I never hear it here, I always have to explain it (you'd think I'd stop saying it really). 

JoJo never stop using it, it will keep it alive.

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This is another one bandied around at home when I was a child, it means a person has that many options that they have no idea what to do, the saying was “ he’s like a fart in a colander he can’t get out for holes”

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If I ever made an assumption that was wrong my granny would say....

"You know what thought did.......it followed a muck cart and thought is was a wedding"

I have no idea where that came from and have never heard anyone else say it.

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9 hours ago, winco1960 said:

If I ever made an assumption that was wrong my granny would say....

"You know what thought did.......it followed a muck cart and thought is was a wedding"

I have no idea where that came from and have never heard anyone else say it.

That was another one that slipped my mind, my parents quoted that on a regular basis.

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A fart in a colander reminds me of the expression….”like a fart in a trance”….regularly use by a Maid of Kent I used to know!

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3 hours ago, tozzin said:

That was another one that slipped my mind, my parents quoted that on a regular basis.

My Mum too, though said "dustcart" rather than "muck cart".

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On 06/12/2021 at 15:26, Lysanderix said:

I n my school days I was taught both French and Spanish . After leaving school I became involved in export and found my attempts in using , especially French ,swiftly put in place with comments such as….”your accent is terrible and I want to improve my English….so would you mind if we spoke your language”….. so I can’t say I found schoolboy French especially useful!😊

Your story sounds similar to mine; I did French & Spanish at school and found a job in export after leaving. However, I found French very useful at work and visited France many times and always got understood (that was A level French & Spanish). The problem was, when they talk back to you at 90mph, it's difficult to understand!

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I don't think that the French really speak faster than we do, it just seems that way if you don't understand what they're saying. "Jabbering" is the commonly used term, but to an uncomprehending foreigner we probably sound as if we're jabbering too.

 

Off topic: this is the first time I've ben able to visit SH in nearly a week; previous attempts resulted in just a blank page on my screen. Was the forum off the air, or was my computer at fault?

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I had the same problem…didn’t realise just how much I enjoyed the chat!

 

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On 17/02/2022 at 16:37, peterinfrance said:

Another one to add to the collection.

 

"It's nowt nor summat"

I know it as "Neither nowt nor summat", which is more grammatically correct. Sort of.

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