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Guest tsavo

Why not join us, it's painless, and better still it's free. The posts may be interesting but are so much better when you can see the pictures used to illustrate them. We'll also do our best to answer any questions about Sheffield and it's history. If we don't know, we'll find out!

So, why not join?

lollollol lol

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  • 1 month later...
Guest carlie167

OK, Heres a question. Does anyone know anything about a school, usually referred to as "The Open Air School". All I know is it was somewhere off Gloucester Crescent, just down from Glossop Rd. My mum was a pupil there, but I dont remember her saying much about it, (this would probably be back in the 30s) Any info would be interesting to me. Can anyone help? :unsure: :unsure:

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OK, Heres a question. Does anyone know anything about a school, usually referred to as "The Open Air School". All I know is it was somewhere off Gloucester Crescent, just down from Glossop Rd. My mum was a pupil there, but I dont remember her saying much about it, (this would probably be back in the 30s) Any info would be interesting to me. Can anyone help? :unsure::unsure:

Hi Carlie,

no luck with the Gloucester Crescent School yet, but found an arlicle about the idea behind the schools which mentions another school at Whitby street, off Main Road Darnall.

Will keep looking.

The open-air school movement

Natural conditions in the classroom have long been regarded as beneficial to student learning. Early in the twentieth century the UK built a number of open-air schools which it was believed benefited the health, well-being and learning of children, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds. The first such was established in 1907 by the LCC at Bostall Wood near Woolwich and it was followed by similar schools mainly for 9-13 year olds in Bradford, Halifax, Sheffield and Norwich (Turner, 1972, p. 58). The openair school movement had originated in Germany and was thought to enhance the educational, health and welfare role of schools by the provision of high levels of sunlight and natural ventilation and through a regime of physical exercise. Typical was Whitby Road Infants' School in Sheffield, built in 1914, which on the suggestion of the City Medical Officer incorporated a plan to maximise access to sunshine and cross-ventilation (Turner, 1972, p. 59).

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Hi Carlie,

no luck with the Gloucester Crescent School yet, but found an arlicle about the idea behind the schools which mentions another school at Whitby street, off Main Road Darnall.

Will keep looking.

The open-air school movement

Natural conditions in the classroom have long been regarded as beneficial to student learning. Early in the twentieth century the UK built a number of open-air schools which it was believed benefited the health, well-being and learning of children, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds. The first such was established in 1907 by the LCC at Bostall Wood near Woolwich and it was followed by similar schools mainly for 9-13 year olds in Bradford, Halifax, Sheffield and Norwich (Turner, 1972, p. 58). The openair school movement had originated in Germany and was thought to enhance the educational, health and welfare role of schools by the provision of high levels of sunlight and natural ventilation and through a regime of physical exercise. Typical was Whitby Road Infants' School in Sheffield, built in 1914, which on the suggestion of the City Medical Officer incorporated a plan to maximise access to sunshine and cross-ventilation (Turner, 1972, p. 59).

Hi There is a Gloucester College shown on the 1855 sheffield map ???

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Guest carlie167

Hi Carlie, Kellys 1954 directory - No2 Gloucester Crescent, Knighton Rt, Springvale House Open Air School

Thanks very much to you and tsavo for your help. At least I know a bit more about it, and knowing the name gives me something more to use when researching, I was beginning to think I was imagining it!! The last time I was in that area the school had gone and houses were in its place. :o

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  • 3 years later...

Thanks very much to you and tsavo for your help. At least I know a bit more about it, and knowing the name gives me something more to use when researching, I was beginning to think I was imagining it!! The last time I was in that area the school had gone and houses were in its place. :o

I went down there yesterday with my sister who was anxious to retrace her roots at Springvale Open Air School.

We trawled the area for some time until we went into Fairmount Nursery on Clarkehouse Road and were told that in their opinion the school had now been demolished some time ago and was indeed replaced by a block of relatively new houses.

My sister was to to receive a photograph from local studies sometime today.

She left Springvale in 1955 and would appreciate a line from anyone whom she would have known.

My email is bmallinder@gmx.co.uk

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