Jump to content

GREAVE of FEOFFEES


Recommended Posts

rover1949

I am reading a book where one of the characters is to be appointed Greave of Feoffees. Not heard of it before so I checked on t'internet.

To my surprise it is a real thing from the middle ages and still exists today. There are Feoffees in Ecclesfield and Rotherham.

Does anyone know of others in the area and how they work?  Perhaps they have ceremonies and regalia?

Oh, and how do you pronounce Feoffee?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Heartshome

Hi rover1949, Northern ones mentioned that I found were, BRADFIELD, BRIDLINGTON, ECCLESFIELD, ROTHERHAM, and YORK

but sure there will be more around.

Link to post
Share on other sites
MartinR

A feofee is trustee who holds a feof or fief.  A greave is more commonly written grieve and is a govenor.  The "Greave of Feoffees" is therefore the chief executive of a charity.

Under the feudal system various taxes "fees" were payable on certain events, particularly the death of the holder of land.  However if the land was enfeoffed to a group of feoffees (trustees), then the man would die holding no lands and therefore not be liable to taxes, closely related to creating family trusts today.  Some of the enfeoffed lands were used for charitable purposes rather than as a family trust.  The Feoffees of the Common Lands of Rotherham hold both the common land and other properties in the area.  The money raised is used for charitable purposes, historically the relief of poverty and education.  The Ecclesfield, feoffees contribute to looking after the fabric of the church, Church of St Mary, Ecclesfield and also make other donations for the benefit of the local population.

Link to post
Share on other sites
rover1949

If we follow the fief root does that make pronunciation Fife-EE. - rhymes with trustee?

I sense this is not a national organisation, so probably no ceremonies or regalia?

Link to post
Share on other sites
rover1949

So FEE-OFF-EE to rhyme with toffee?

I used to live in Ecclesfield so knew Feoffees Road and Feoffees Hall but assumed it was a family name. There is also a Greaves Road.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...