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Brightside Lane - houses


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John Cartwright

I have traced my Great Grandfather living at 5 Brightside Lane in 1871. i have an early map which does not show house numbers but on the assumption that road number start nearest the city centre i have estimated number 5 as being at the intersection with Newhall road to the left of the pub on the corner (see attached map). Does anyone have a map showing house numbers or any photographs of housing on Brightside Lane around this time?

5 Brightside Lane est. Map.jpg

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madannie77

The oldest directory I have access to which includes Brightside Lane is 1879. There are no odd-numbered properties on Brightside Lane.

However, on maps from the 1850s and 1860s what is now Brightside Lane is named as Bent Lane, and there is a Brightside Lane which heads north-east from Brightside village alongside the river. This later became Meadow Hall Road.

brightside lane 1850s.jpg

https://maps.nls.uk/view/102345199#zoom=5&lat=1356&lon=2504&layers=BT

Pure guesswork, but i wonder if 5 Brightside Lane in the early 1870s was somewhere near Brightside Bridge, perhaps one of the row of houses seen in the map extract below next to Naseby Street. Later maps show this row as 1-11 Meadow Hall Road - were they 1-11 Brightside Lane before the roads were renamed?

image.png

https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/438496/390523/12/100392

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John Cartwright

Thanks for the information, I think you may be on to something here, he moved to Brightside Lane from Barnsley aged 16 with his widowed mother, sister and two male lodgers whom I think were relatives of his mother. It would make sense if he was looking for work after the death of his father, the breadwinner of the family. Also later in life he lived and brought up his family at various locations around Carbrook and ended up owning the Industry Inn on Dunlop Street. Thank you again for your research, I only have to track down the tale that my father told me about him going to Alaska to find gold and coming back penniless after having to work as 'bouncer' in a drinking house in New York to earn money for his passage back to England.

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John Cartwright

madannie77, just noticed the T W Ward Albion Works plaque as your logo. By coincidence I worked at Albion Works from 1967-abt.1971 when we were moved to Broomhall Road. My office window looked out onto the clock.

 

 

 

 

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syrup

Mr Charles Edward Cartwright, 68, R.I.P.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph 17 October 1922


Sheffield Independent 17 October 1922
 

Sheffield 1.JPG

Sheffield 2.JPG

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leksand
On 04/08/2020 at 10:48, John Cartwright said:

I have traced my Great Grandfather living at 5 Brightside Lane in 1871. i have an early map which does not show house numbers but on the assumption that road number start nearest the city centre i have estimated number 5 as being at the intersection with Newhall road to the left of the pub on the corner (see attached map). Does anyone have a map showing house numbers or any photographs of housing on Brightside Lane around this time?

5 Brightside Lane est. Map.jpg

Is this Brightside Lane, Brightside Bierlow or Brightside Lane, Attercliffe cum Darnall (ie. Carbrook)?

I've recently had a devil of a time trying to pinpoint properties on Brightside Lane, Brightside Bierlow in the 1871 census. There seems to be a disparity of ~380 in the numbers designated between then and the 1950's surveys but as Madannie77 mentions, they're all evens.

Although I don't think it appears on OS maps, what is now known as Weedon Street was called Brightside Lane. I've encountered it frequently in architects plans, police reports, press and the like. There were definitely odd numbers on that (the left hand side when heading towards Brightside from the point where Attercliffe Common meets Sheffield Road). The very top end of this road on the Attercliffe side of the Don actually falls within the old Brightside Bierlow township but I don't remember spotting any numbers when investigating the area. The Bridge Inn, Brightside is listed as Brightside Lane in the 1871 census, though I think most of the buildings beyond appear as "Rose Hill".

 

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leksand

In relation to Syrup's post, Charles Edward Cartwright was licensee at the Industry, Carbrook from the 18th of April 1894 to the 21st April 1915 (though would have been resident a little before the first date and have left a little before the latter). He was also recorded as the registered owner.

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John Cartwright

Leaksand- Have search on Pictures Sheffield for Brightside Bridge. There is a photo looking through the railway bridge at Nos 1-11 Meadowhall Road that was formerly Brightside Lane.

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leksand
51 minutes ago, John Cartwright said:

Leaksand- Have search on Pictures Sheffield for Brightside Bridge. There is a photo looking through the railway bridge at Nos 1-11 Meadowhall Road that was formerly Brightside Lane.

Thanks - not sure which photo you mean as I get 200 coming up on that search! Sadly not really of use to me anyway as my area of interest is Brightside Lane "proper" - the even numbered properties around Newhall - and the Holmes farm area on Brightside Lane "Attercliffe" (though actually in Brightside Bierlow) where 1871 census data doesn't offer sufficient detail to "route trace" and the resident I required to prove the broader property location had, seemingly, left in the preceding year.

The point of my original post, perhaps missed, was that if Weedon Street was numbered at the time then #5 (presumably not far up the road behind the Travellers' Rest) would have been known as #5 Brightside Lane. Whether it appears on the census or not as such I haven't had the opportunity to check, but that area of Carbrook & Tinsley was known as Brightside Lane End. However, if your census return is for Attercliffe cum Darnall and not Brightside Bierlow, then there can be little conjecture as to where the property was - it was Weedon Street,

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southside

John this is the enumerators route from the 1871 census, it might give you a better idea as to where your ancestor was living.

No5 Brightside Lane was on the last census page right at the end of his route, I've also included the next route he walked after leaving Brightside Lane.

 

Brightside Enumerators Route(1).jpg

Brightside Enumerators Route (2).jpg

Brightside Enumerators Route(3).jpg

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leksand

Having now checked it would appear you were correct in the first place. The property appears to have been near the top of Newhall Road - the Steam Clock being #2 Newhall Road. Seems that the seven properties you highlighted were numbered in sequence 1-7, SW to NE,leading up to the junction of Newhall & Brightside. No need to trust the idle speculation thrown up here!

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John Cartwright

Having looked at several maps in date order I reckon that:-

1854 Bents Lane (now called Brightside Lane) ran from Savile Street East along the top of Newhall Road to Brightside Bridge where there was a junction where the Bridge Inn used to be. Brightside Lane (now called Meadowhall Road) ran NE along the northern bank of the river to Brightside Mill. Mill Lane (now called Weedon Street) ran from Attercliffe Road to the junction at the Bridge Inn.

1890 Mill Lane is now called Weedon Street. Bents Lane is now called Brightside Lane and ends at the tram terminus at the side of the Bridge Inn. What used to be called Brightside Lane going NE alongside the river is now renamed Meadowhall Road.

When all this happened I would guess around 1870 as the information from the 1871 census puts No. 5 Brightside Lane somewhere at the top of Newhall Road.

 

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leksand
2 hours ago, John Cartwright said:

Having looked at several maps in date order I reckon that:-

1854 Bents Lane (now called Brightside Lane) ran from Savile Street East along the top of Newhall Road to Brightside Bridge where there was a junction where the Bridge Inn used to be. Brightside Lane (now called Meadowhall Road) ran NE along the northern bank of the river to Brightside Mill. Mill Lane (now called Weedon Street) ran from Attercliffe Road to the junction at the Bridge Inn.

1890 Mill Lane is now called Weedon Street. Bents Lane is now called Brightside Lane and ends at the tram terminus at the side of the Bridge Inn. What used to be called Brightside Lane going NE alongside the river is now renamed Meadowhall Road.

When all this happened I would guess around 1870 as the information from the 1871 census puts No. 5 Brightside Lane somewhere at the top of Newhall Road.

 

Sorry to labour the point, particularly as it is now evident that it is not relevant to your original enquiry, but this is not a matter of conjecture. Weedon Street, the street running from Carbrook & Tinsley to Brightside, was known as Brightside Lane in the late 1860s & early 1870s. It may not appear on preceding or subsequent OS Maps as such but it does on architects plans for official submission for developments in that part of Carbrook as well as magistrates' records precisely of that period. It was known as such, very reasonably, because it was the lane that ran to Brightside.

Brightside Lane, Brightside Bierlow, the road that runs from Local Fields/Atlas to Brightside, the extent of which has probably been pretty consistently applied since Savil(l)e Street East extended to intersect it, is essentially today as it was in 1871 in terms of route. The Newhall area that it runs beside was an area undergoing significant development during the period discussed and the numbers designated to properties at that time subsequently received significant revision - as previously noted.

Clearly the prospect of ambiguity from having two very significant roads known by the same name led to the official designation of Weedon Street to the Attercliffe cum Darnall version, possibly around this very time, possibly before. Notwithstanding this, Weedon Street continued to be known as Brightside Lane and the usage persisted, and amongst many who should have known better too. As late as 1897 certain property at the intersection of the roads now known as Weedon Street, Attercliffe Common and Sheffield Road was still addressed as "Brightside Lane End" in magistrates' records.

As a further aside, I should probably have been more careful in my description of Newhall Road. Obviously my terminology "top" was understood as describing its intersection with Brightside Lane (Brightside Bierlow), although it does extend to Carlisle Street, East. There are, however, instances where Carlisle Road (the road running from Grimesthorpe to Newhall and not the nascent Carlisle Street of the 1850s OS map) is termed Newhall Road, the top of which describes a very different location - not particularly close to any Brightside Lane though.

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leksand
On 07/08/2020 at 10:44, leksand said:

Having now checked it would appear you were correct in the first place. The property appears to have been near the top of Newhall Road - the Steam Clock being #2 Newhall Road. Seems that the seven properties you highlighted were numbered in sequence 1-7, SW to NE,leading up to the junction of Newhall & Brightside. No need to trust the idle speculation thrown up here!

Was looking at other properties in this area a little while back and it would appear that the address of your GGF was mistated on the census! There is actually a conventional numbering system applied to Brightside Lane (Brightside Bierlow) which begins from (or directly after) the Junction Hotel, with that (or an otherwise unnumbered, adjacent property) being the inferred #2, and numbers allocated 4, 6 &c increasing in the direction of Brightside. I'd guess the row of houses numbered #1-7 to the SW of the Steam Clock was probably known as something or other Terrace, but that this was not readily evident to the enumerator, because otherwise you would have had a pair of properties numbered 2, 4 & 6 Brightside Lane in very close proximity.

That said, it seems that the numbering of the area was a rushed affair, enacted specifically for the 1871 census (and significantly revised later). Chanced upon this letter to the SDT which may be of broader interest.

SDT18710207.jpg.a2709e5d4a7340da8a0613a5943f8c02.jpg

At least there was a numbering system employed by April on Brightside Lane - it was not the case in some of the other areas listed in the piece.

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John Cartwright

Leksand, 

Thank you for the information. I am pretty sure of the location now, being in the near proximity of the Steam Clock. I have been looking for photographs but I think 1871 was a little before photography became popular and that the properties around there did not survive much after the turn of the century to leave them available to be a subject of the photographer.

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leksand
On 07/09/2020 at 12:52, John Cartwright said:

Leksand, 

Thank you for the information. I am pretty sure of the location now, being in the near proximity of the Steam Clock. I have been looking for photographs but I think 1871 was a little before photography became popular and that the properties around there did not survive much after the turn of the century to leave them available to be a subject of the photographer.

I'm not sure what would make you think that John. As alluded to throughout much of the topic these were new properties; privately developed, privately owned, providing private incomes - not council prefabs! It's too small an islet for the major industry that could have bought landlords up. I'd guess that they'd have lasted until December 1940 and were probably taken out by the same bomber, maybe the same bomb, that did for the Midland.

With regard to photos, you are probably right, they may not exist. However, I reckon that if anybody was interested enough to "snap" the properties around 1871, they'd probably be interested enough to note what the properties were actually called. Ten-to-one it would help you in finding any such photo by knowing what they called then too!

Anyhow, good luck with your hunting.

dearjohn.jpg.fdbeaf6af0a4a1f42359ce6afda76022.jpg

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