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Ratter

Jawbone v Whalejaw

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Ratter

Since moving to North Sheffield, and looking at maps of all dates, I have noticed that ‘officially’ the hill known as Jawbone, is shown as Whalejaw Hill.  

The hill is named Oughtibridge Lane and runs from Oughtibridge up to Lane Head and the junction of Skew Hill Lane and Stephen Lane. In fact, after just checking Google Earth, the hill starts as Oughtibridge Lane, then Côte de Oughtibridge, then Jawbone Hill and back to Oughtibridge Lane after the sharp bend.

The oldest map I can access is from 1888 and that clearly shows Whalejaw Hill, at the bend by the Birley Stone.

Any ideas or thoughts ... at one time I believed it was the Oughtibridgers who called it Jawbone, with the Grenosiders preferring Whalejaw ... but it seems like Jawbone is the most common.
 

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Ursa Minor

As a Sheffield Sixer, I've always known it as Jawbone Hill, never heard anyone refer to it as Whalejaw. The  Cote de Oughtibridge obviously refers to the  Tour de France visit in 2014 when it was a Third category climb in the run in to Sheffield. 

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Edmund

It was always referred to as Jawbone Hill in the old newspapers.  Supposedly named for the pair of whale jawbones set up as an arch ( a la Whitby).  In the 1920's they were said to have been used for gateposts at Stubbin Farm at the bottom of the hill. 

Part of a whale jaw arch was found at Hatfield near Doncaster in 1931 and exhibited at the Weston Park Museum. The remnant was 3 feet long and five feet 4 inches around, believed to have been installed over a field gate.

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Ratter

Thanks for the comments ... the attached picture shows an extract from the 1949 OS map. This shows Whalejaw Hill as the OS ‘official’ name.  I’m wondering when did the locals start using Jawbone Hill.

I get the reference to Côte de Oughtibridge ... at the time I was hoping it would be called Côte de Jawbone, or even Côte de Whalejaw, but clearly the organisers settled for a less controversial name.

As a TdF fan, I’ve travelled to France many times to see various stages, including three times on the Champs Elysees ... well worth the effort of going to see the greatest ‘Free Sporting Event‘ for spectators, in the world.  Even better since the Brits started winning.

 

227C9470-67CE-426F-A77A-45AD2DAFFBEA.jpeg

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rover1949

I used to live in Grenoside and it was always known as Jawbone Hill.

Don't recall any whale bones there, - Whitby yes but that is a long way away.

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Stu_1981

A few bits from 1926 newspapers for those interested:

 

 

 

Jawbone hill_a.jpg

Jawbone hill_i.jpg

Jawbone hill.jpg

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Ratter

Thanks Stu ...

Interesting cuttings ... strengthens the ‘Jawbone Hill’ argument.  No comments supporting ‘Whalejaw’ from any source.  It seems to have been removed from the more current OS Maps.

i like the comparison with the Derbyshire ‘Surprise’ View ... and would agree that our local ‘Surprise’ is every bit as good ... if not better, as the view gets better as you descend Jawbone.


 

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Stu_1981
14 minutes ago, Ratter said:

Thanks Stu ...

Interesting cuttings ... strengthens the ‘Jawbone Hill’ argument.  No comments supporting ‘Whalejaw’ from any source.  It seems to have been removed from the more current OS Maps.

i like the comparison with the Derbyshire ‘Surprise’ View ... and would agree that our local ‘Surprise’ is every bit as good ... if not better, as the view gets better as you descend Jawbone.


 

I confess that I haven't been to Jawbone Hill, but I am keen to remedy that! I've emailed the Wadsley Bridge Working Men's Club to see if they have anything on file about the bone (as it was mentioned that it was presented there in the first clipping). They seem to be very keen to publicise the history of the club. Such a coincidence when I read the discussion thread about The Grange (their club house site) today! 

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rover1949

I recall listening to a radio programme about the Victorian surveyors who compiled the first OS maps.  After the actual survey the next job was to allocate names to all the places and features they had mapped, - this varied according to who was consulted.  Apparently they had a handbook with guidance to which version to accept, so the lord of the manor had precedence over the tenant farmer.

I think the stories about bits of whale bone are probably red herrings?

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Ratter

I think I’ve heard or read this, as well ... thanks for highlighting it.  

I also think you are right about actual Whale Bones being misleading.

However, it’s one of those queries which will, probably, never be solved.

 

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