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The Sheffield area was once a tropical swamp forest!


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John Russell

I saw this on Twitter today, posted by Museums Sheffield :  https://twitter.com/MuseumSheffield/status/1271094627450355727

This fossil trunk was found in Brightside, 1896. It’s an example of Lepidodendron, a group of tree-like plants that lived around 300 million yrs ago, in the Carboniferous period. There's more info in the thread linked.

EaPSxGsX0AIpnwj.jpg

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lysandernovo

That's why we have coal measures. High Hazels Park used to have several fossilised trees on display...all had been dug up out of local mines.

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Edmund

Elijah Howarth, the curator of the Mappin Art Gallery, where the fossils were sent, gave a lecture about them in April 1897, at the Literary and Philosophical Rooms, Leopold Street. He explained that they had been found during work on extending the railway line at Brightside Midland station.  The sloping bank where they were excavated had "rippled" into parallel depressions showing traces of a long gone sandy shore. It was first proposed to send the fossils to Derby, but Mr Howarth realised their local importance, had arranged with Sir Frederick Mappin to preserve them in the Sheffield museum.

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lysandernovo

In the days when we used coal to heat our homes many a young fossil hunter would find examples of fossilised tree leaves and ferns in the household coal....that's how I started a life time interest in geology...passed onto my son who became a geologist!

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Paul Worrall

This is a wonderful link.

I'm a great fan of the 'Coal Measures' - Westhapian Rock.

However, shouldn't we have a separate link? Perhaps, Sheffield Rocks?

There is so much to look at and discuss.

Cheers,

Wazzie....

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John Russell

When I started this thread I looked for a suitable forum to put this subject in but none of the existing topics seemed appropriate. So that's why it's in 'chat'. Please do move it or start a new forum if appropriate :-)

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tozzin
11 hours ago, SteveHB said:

Fossilized Tree, High Hazels Park (s25102)

Date: 20/05/1968

https://www.picturesheffield.com/;s25102

s25102.jpg

I believe this was discovered while the Midland Station was being built. I Remember being intrigued by it as a ten year old. A tree root made of stone.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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neddy

Found a piece of fossilised tree on Parkwood back in the 70's it was about 10 inches long and about 4 inches wide.

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lysandernovo

Why, one wonders, would it be placed in High Hazels Park?....although its nearly 70 years ago I seem to remember there was a library or gallery there. Perhaps someone knows?

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tozzin

There was a cafe with a large chess board on the ground with large pieces plus there was a large outdoor stage that put on Piorettes ( don’t know if that’s the correct word ) shows in the summer, they were dressed in white satin suits with large pom poms on their hats and suits, close to this outdoor stage was what I thought was a large pond, you could sail your boats on it, but being a child it wasn’t probably as large as what I remember, I suppose the park has lost all its charisma which I remember, it’s been well over sixty years since I visited the park, happy days long gone.

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History dude

Sheffield was also partially a beach too! Hence all the Sandstone rocks in the area. Sandstone just being compressed sand. In our front garden on the Manor, we had a sandstone rock which even had the visible impressions of ancient fern type plants in them.   

When they were building the foundations of the Manor Development Centre the builders told me that they came upon the remains of fossil tree stumps. I don't think they were saved though.  

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lysandernovo

Geology is a fascinating subject ...its study shows just how our world has changed ,in so many ways, over millions of years...Poles have changed position, our islands have drifted, been covered in desert, been covered by sea, swamps and even coral reefs....Given our wastefulness perhaps future generations will study layers of plastics!!!

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Paul Worrall

Hi.

Yes, Geology is a fasinating subject with many different components. If there is anyone out there who is interested in local geology there are x2 possible avenues to explore.

1. The Open University Geology Society - Yorkshire Branch. For approximately £22 per year members enjoy an on-line magerzine, 'On the Rocks' and in normal times several local, national and international Field Studies. There is no set level for membership, participants don't have to be graduates, they just have to have an interest in this wonderful subject.

2. Yorkshire Geological Society. They often work in conjunction with the OUGS. Again they offer a range of Field Studies and ability isn't an issue.

Both organisations can be accessed via Google.

'Rocks are always there, they don't go far!'

Enjoy.

Wazzie Worrall

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Stu_1981

Does anyone know if much of geological interest has been unearthed in the Lodge Moor/Redmires area? Obviously, of the two places, Lodge Moor has had a lot of development over the years (building of housing estates/golf-course etc) and I wonder what was beneath the peaty moorland...? I also wonder what was discovered during the building of Redmires Reservoirs.

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Paul Worrall

Hi Stu,

The geology of the Lodge Moor/Redmires area is well doucument. The area marks the boundary between rocks of the Namarian (older) which run to the west and the Westphalian (younger) which run to the east. The Redmires Flags mark the upper reaches of the Namarian Rock.

Peter Kennett, who worked as the Geology Teacher at High Storrs before he retired wrote a pamphet (2007) 'The Geology of the Porter Valley - What Lies Beneath Our Feet? - www.sheffieldportervalley.org.uk.' 

You can also check the Geological Survey Sheet 100 - Sheffield and the accompaning book. This map and section give an excellent insight into the geology of the area.

There's loads of stuff so please keep digging!

Cheers,

Wazzie Worrall

 

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Stu_1981
5 minutes ago, Paul Worrall said:

Hi Stu,

The geology of the Lodge Moor/Redmires area is well doucument. The area marks the boundary between rocks of the Namarian (older) which run to the west and the Westphalian (younger) which run to the east. The Redmires Flags mark the upper reaches of the Namarian Rock.

Peter Kennett, who worked as the Geology Teacher at High Storrs before he retired wrote a pamphet (2007) 'The Geology of the Porter Valley - What Lies Beneath Our Feet? - www.sheffieldportervalley.org.uk.' 

You can also check the Geological Survey Sheet 100 - Sheffield and the accompaning book. This map and section give an excellent insight into the geology of the area.

There's loads of stuff so please keep digging!

Cheers,

Wazzie Worrall

 

Many thanks for the pointers! That sounds like a good place for me to start.

Cheers,

Stu

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Paul Worrall

Hi Stu,

I've sent you this separate message because there is absolutely heaps of stuff on the Namarian (Millstone Grit) and Westphalian (Coal Measures). I'm not sure what you already know so I'm guessing and I don't want to repeat myself.

If you want to contact me about Sheffield Rock please feel free - [email protected]

Cheers,

Paul 'Wazzie' Worrall

 

Westpha' Series.jpg

Namurian Series.jpg

Geol Map Sheff City.jpg

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lysandernovo

Excellent stuff! Thanks, Paul!

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Stu_1981

Thanks very much Paul! Really appreciated!

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