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Calvin72

Anyone know what this is?

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Calvin72

Hello All,

              On Abbey Lane near the junction with Abbeydale Road South is this marker. It's close to the railway and I've seen similar railway company property markers. Is that what this is? I could only see one.

 

Abbey Lane marker.jpeg

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MartinR

It looks like a boundary former for crown property.  The broad arrow is certainly used by government, and the top looks like GR around a crown.  I can't get a clearer view on Google Street View, but I assume it is the marker at the property edge of 451 Abbey Lane.  Does anyone know what was here before the housing development?

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tozzin

It’s something to do with officialdom , it’s either a hydrant / water main marker etc the arrow is the Government mark 

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Edmund

Here it is marked on the Ordnance Survey map - which I think indicates that it has an importance in itself, rather than marking something else.  I was told at school that the arrow marks underneath a line, indicated where Ordnance Survey height measurements had been taken, though I've never seen a post like this before. They are normally carved into a gatepost or similar.

1388688665_AbbeyLane.png.c054993d5857587b7ca21ac51eb6d9e7.png

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SteveHB

Same location?

ALn.jpg

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boginspro

I can't remember seeing one with a crown on before but the map symbol is for an Ordnance Survey Bench Mark, They were erected / cut by Ordnance Survey leveling staff to provide a network of points at which height has been precisely measured above sea level. There used to be about half a million bench marks in Great Britain but they are not needed any more due to GPS mapping and many have now disappeared. If that is GR on it I hope it survives.

EDIT How about a new post something like "carved broad arrow marks in stone".

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MartinR

Broad arrow is government, specifically particularly military.  One outfit that historically belonged to the military was the Ordnance Survey - hence their use of it.  The OS map certainly shows a benchmark at this point.  Incidentally it is the V section horizontal line that is the level, not the tip of the arrow.  I must say though that I've never seen one on such a lightweight structure before, typically they are in walls.

 

Edit note: Agreed not just military, but in the C20 onwards military was more common, possibly due to two world wars.

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Voldy
4 hours ago, Edmund said:

Here it is marked on the Ordnance Survey map - which I think indicates that it has an importance in itself, rather than marking something else.  I was told at school that the arrow marks underneath a line, indicated where Ordnance Survey height measurements had been taken, though I've never seen a post like this before. They are normally carved into a gatepost or similar.

1388688665_AbbeyLane.png.c054993d5857587b7ca21ac51eb6d9e7.png

https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4317837

5 years ago apparently.

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tozzin
8 hours ago, MartinR said:

Broad arrow is government, specifically military.  One outfit that historically belonged to the military was the Ordnance Survey - hence their use of it.  The OS map certainly shows a benchmark at this point.  Incidentally it is the V section horizontal line that is the level, not the tip of the arrow.  I must say though that I've never seen one on such a lightweight structure before, typically they are in walls.

The Arrow is the Government “ Trade Mark “ so to speak and not specifically Military, everything they own has the mark, cartoon prisoners are dressed in a uniform covered in arrows, as are these two Suffragettes.

 

image.jpeg

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Calvin72

Well this has been interesting - thanks everyone! Makes sense there only being the one now. I had a look around expecting a few more if they were boundary markers :)

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Voldy

Perseverance has its reward!  Well found SteveHB, keep up the spotting Calvin72 we need more mental stimulation this year!

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kidneystone

Found this one on Hollow Gate, near Burncross Road. 

20200428_130453.jpg

20200428_130457.jpg

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Calvin72

Now there are a few of these around. What's interesting about them is the slot for numbers in the front centre. Some of them are still intact with numbers inserted. A different object but a whole new discussion to begin :)

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Voldy

There are a lot of photos if you google 'GPO markers', what isn't clear is when the concrete posts were introduced. They all would have a distance in feet, as hydrant plates indicate pipe size and distance, earlier GPO versions feet and inches. Maybe the 1930's and certainly later as the demand for telephones increased.

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Calvin72

I was sent this pic today - near Wire Mill Dam. A better example :)

 

Wire Mill marker.jpg

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John Russell

The fact it has feet and inches cast into and a space underneath where the measurements could be added, specific to that location, suggests it is a marker post indicating that there is a cover in the road surface, that distance from it. Much as water hydrants are marked today. Is there a corresponding cover in the road or has it been covered during resurfacing?

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