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RichardB

Jew Lane/Jehu Lane

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Well, that's what I remember of it, this would be before the cinema accidently got burnt down. Anyway, it was quite busy in its own lifetime, as the following information shows :

First Last Occupation Address Directory Year

John BINGLEY currier Jehu Lane Gales & Martin 1787

William INGHAM retailer of spirits Jehu Lane Gales & Martin 1787

John WOOD blacksmith Jehu Lane Gales & Martin 1787

John MOORHOUSE Surgeon Jehu Lane Holden's 1811

Thomas TAYLOR Tailor 1 Jehu Lane Baine's 1822

John JARVIS Flour dealer 11 Jehu Lane Baine's 1822

John ALDAM shoe maker 12 Jehu Lane Baine's 1822

John BARKER Vict. Blue Bell 13 Jehu Lane Baine's 1822

GREGORY & STANILAND Table knife manufacturers 4 Jehu Lane Baine's 1822

Thomas EVANHAND 7 Parker's Yard, Jehu Lane Baine's 1822

Richard WHITE Vict. Bricklayer's Arms 8 Jehu Lane Baine's 1822

Charles DYSON Flour dealer Jehu Lane Baine's 1822

Thomas TAYLOR Tailors 1 Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

James KERMAN Provision Dearlers 11 Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

John ALDAM Boot & Shoe Makers 12 Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

Charles DYSON Shopkeepers & Dealers in Groceries & Sundries 2 Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

George DYSON Postman 3 Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

John GAMBLE Boot & Shoe Makers 5 Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

George BARNARD Tailors 7 Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

William HARRIS Taverns & Public Houses (Bricklayer's Arms) 9 Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

John BARKER Taverns & Public Houses (Blue Ball) Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

Jno HOWARD Veterinary Surgeons (Shoeing Forge) Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

John HOWARD Blacksmiths (see also Whitesmiths) Jehu Lane Pigot's 1828

John TAYLOR Butter dealer 1 Jehu Lane White's 1833

James KERMAN bacon, cheese and butter factor 11 Jehu Lane White's 1833

John ALDAM shoemaker 12 Jehu Lane White's 1833

Charles DYSON shopkeeper 2 Jehu Lane White's 1833

James GREGORY table knife, razor, plated dessert &c. manufacturer 5 and 7 Jehu Lane White's 1833

John GAMBLES shoemaker 6 Jehu Lane White's 1833

John HOWARD blacksmith 7 Jehu Lane White's 1833

John RENTON basket maker 8 Jehu Lane White's 1833

William HARRIS vict. Bricklayers' Arms 9 Jehu Lane White's 1833

John ROBINSON coachman Star Yard, Jehu Lane White's 1833

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Have a look i think this is the lane you refer to RichardB, centre of picture.

Map dated 1832.

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Thanks for that SteveHB, and we get the Tontine and the King's Head on Change Alley thrown in for free !!!!

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Thanks for that SteveHB, and we get the Tontine and the King's Head on Change Alley thrown in for free !!!!

You can add the map to your pub posts if you want, it's my map (photo copy).

Dimentions 21" by 33 and a half inches, so thats 'A' summutt or other,

going to need one hell of a scanner arnt i. lol

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Couple more maps, showing Jehu Lane (Watson's Walk is also on here, if you look for it between Hartshead and Angel St)

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I just found this in Addy's Hall of Waltheof:

Jehu Lane or Jew Lane.--This lane which, I am told, was so narrow that a householder on one side of it could almost have shaken hands with his neighbour on the other, was on the south side of "Fitzalan Square." The making of the square has wiped this old street off the local map, but it led, according to Fairbank's plan, from Baker's Hill into "the Swine Market." I have conversed with many old people who spoke of this street as Jew Lane, and they were quite right in doing so. It occurs, however, as "Jehu" in Gosling's plan, and as Jehu lane in a list of Sheffield street-names, made early in the last century, given by Hunter. We must remember that every considerable town, both in England and on the Continent, had its Jewish quarter. Winchester, York, Norwich, and other towns had their Jewry, or place where the Jews lived. There was a Jewry, according to Stow, in London. "There was," he says, "a place within the liberties of the Tower called the Jewry because it was inhabited by Jews." These merchants and money-lenders were found everywhere. It is perhaps significant that the street above Jehu Lane should be called Change Alley. I notice the surname Jehu in the London Directory for 1890, as though it were Jew written in two syllables. In London vestiges of the quarter once occupied by the Jews have remained to our time in the names Old Jewry and Jewin Street, gywen being the old plural of giu or giw, a Jew. Our "Jehu" represents the old spelling, though the word was pronounced as a monosyllable. Perhaps it was in a spirit of conscious irony that the old inhabitants of Sheffield put their swine market at the mouth of Jehu or Jew Lane.

I need hardly say that the existence of an ancient street in Sheffield bearing this name throws considerable light upon the early condition of the borough. It shows that the borough had enough commerce in early times to need the services of the Jewish money-lender, for all early centres of commerce had their Jewish quarters. As all Jews were banished from England in 1280 a small Jewish settlement may have been established in Sheffield before that time.

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I love the mans style of writing. Thank you.

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I seem to remember seeing a very old map of Sheffield where Jew or Jehu Lane was spelt Thew lane.

Maybe someone could explain this spelling?

PopT

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'The making of the square has wiped this old street off the local map'

I can remember being shown a small lane, just off the top of Commercial Street, and was told this was Jew Lane.

http://www.britaine.co.uk/lancashire/vietnamese also shows a community centre with the folowing address - Jew Lane, S1 2BE Sheffield, South Yorkshire (I can't find Jew Lane, Sheffield in the Postcode Finder webpages though).

http://walkit.com/assets/Walk-Sheffield-09-Booklet.pdf shows map with a walk along Jew Lane.

Was Addy wrong? Does some portion of the old Jew Lane survive?

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We did not have the 1950's OS maps when this Topic was started,

an un-named lane in the area of Jew Lane can be seen here.

Link to 1950's OS

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The Sheffield Vietnamese Community Association certainly addressed as Jew Lane, and their streetmap link points to the top of Commercial Street

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Is the Street sign still there ?, picturesheffield t01148

Looking at this Google Street View I would say no

<iframe width="425" height="350" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" src="http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&amp;source=embed&amp;hl=en&amp;geocode=&amp;q=flat+st,+norton&amp;aq=&amp;sll=53.800651,-4.064941&amp;sspn=19.648276,57.084961&amp;vpsrc=0&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=Flat+St,+Norton,+Sheffield+S1+2,+United+Kingdom&amp;ll=53.382316,-1.464881&amp;spn=0.00965,0.027874&amp;t=m&amp;z=14&amp;layer=c&amp;cbll=53.383086,-1.46372&amp;panoid=clMPxkyOSM2DZmeTcUNaRQ&amp;cbp=12,183.78,,0,8.04&amp;output=svembed"></iframe><br /><small><a href="http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&amp;source=embed&amp;hl=en&amp;geocode=&amp;q=flat+st,+norton&amp;aq=&amp;sll=53.800651,-4.064941&amp;sspn=19.648276,57.084961&amp;vpsrc=0&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=Flat+St,+Norton,+Sheffield+S1+2,+United+Kingdom&amp;ll=53.382316,-1.464881&amp;spn=0.00965,0.027874&amp;t=m&amp;z=14&amp;layer=c&amp;cbll=53.383086,-1.46372&amp;panoid=clMPxkyOSM2DZmeTcUNaRQ&amp;cbp=12,183.78,,0,8.04" style="color:#0000FF;text-align:left">View Larger Map</a></small>

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Part of Jew Lane does still remain and as discribed in tonights Star

it is a dark alleyway.

Councillors have been asked to authorise the closure of this

historic right of way for the developers to turn a house into flats.

Now the next question is what is / was this house that we must all pass

and never notice?

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:(

In the early part of the week,

an inquest was held at the on the body of Charles Lee, a lodger at

a public house in Jehu-lane, who was found dead in bed on Friday morning.

It appeared that when the deceased went to bed the night before, he had complained of illness,

and had expressed a wish that he might die before the morning.

There was reason to believe that he died within an hour after he went to bed.

Died by visitation of God.

(February 13 th, 1836)

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Bricklayers Arms ...

In the early part of the week,an inquest was held at the Palace Innon the body of Charles Lee, a lodger at a public house in Jehu-lane ...

(February 13 th, 1836)

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Palace Inn, Baker's Hill, Thomas Clifford victualler.

Baker's Hill ?

In the early part of the week an inquest was held at the Palace Inn ...

(February 13 th, 1836)

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Palace Inn, Baker's Hill, Thomas Clifford victualler.

Baker's Hill ?

Seen on the maps in this topic,

someone on here has taken a recent photograph ..

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1774 Huntsman & Asline, button makers, Jehu Lane.

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In November 1846 the Independent described a variety of street improvements, amongst them: "...gives power to the Commissioners to make the following new streets....5. Baker's hill to Pond street. But this includes a great deal more. Connected with it is the widening of all Jehu lane and about 100 yards of Pond street. The upper or western side of Jehu lane is to come down, so as to turn this narrow lane into a wide street. The new street begins with the Palace Inn and goes forward for about 100 yards, crossing Pond hill just above the end of Little Pond street. Here the widening of Pond street commences. It begins by cutting away a wide belt of property on the upper side, gradually narrowing to a point where the passage leads up to Arundel street. This improvement will give us from the end of Pond street to the north end of the Old Haymarket, a straight street of about 700 yards long."

Here is an extract from a letter to the Independent in 1872. There was much debate about the renaming of streets

OLD SHEFFIELD STREET NAMES.

To the EDITOR - There is as much (possibly more) local history to be gathered from street names which have disappeared, as from those which remain. The following is a list of some of the older names that have vanished, or been altered, or which linger only in the vocabulary of old inhabitants. I give their modern equivalents so far as I know them :—Brinsworth’s (or Brentsworth’s) Orchard (Orchard street), Townhead cross, Blind or Hollin lane (Holly street), Truelove’s gutter, (Castle street) China (now Cheney) square, Longstone lane, Church yard, Bull stake (Old Haymarket), Jehu lane (late Commercial

street), Hermitage Bowling green, Banks, Irish cross Cross street, Isle, Cleeham, Bowling green. Petticoat lane, Norfold, Old Waterhouse. Pond Well hill, Saint Pavers (Sands Paviours), Parkgate, Pinstone Croft lane (Pinstone street), Lambert knot Scotland street), Lambert croft (Lambert street , Town mill, Hick’s-stile held (entrance to Paradise square from Campo lane), Lombard street, Figg lane (Figtree -lane), Barn street, Workhouse croft (Paradise street), The Underwater. The White Rails (Nursery street), Colston crofts (Colson street and Bridge street), Batten row, Holy croft, New Peascroft (Pea croft), New

Church side, Vicarage croft (Vicar lane), Red croft (Redhill), Bailey field, Sycamorehill (Tudor st.) Of course more modern changes which have even yet hardly obtained foot·hold among us - Cambridge street instead of Coal pit lane, Brunswick road for Tomcross lane, and the disestablishment of Tudor

street, Little Sheffield, (which in its turn had displaced Gaol street) by Thomas street. The changes from croft to lane, or from lane to street, are

perhaps hardly worth recording. It may be noticed, however, that often the word street was formerly omitted altogether. Thus: Portobello, Gibraltar,

Scotland, Ponds. The old directories contain manifold variation in spelling. Thus Hollis croft frequently appears as Holles croft, Colson croft, Colston, and so on.

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Seen on the maps in this topic,

someone on here has taken a recent photograph ..

Thats Shude hill isn't it?

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Thats Shude hill isn't it?

Baker's Hill looking towards Shude Hill, from the top of the steps next t the old GPO.

Flash Earth

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Looking at the 1853 map (below), and comparing it with the 1832 map (above) it looks as though Jehu Lane became "Commercial street" (unrelated to the current one).

This Commercial Street then appears to have been built over by 1890 (yellow dotted line), the Bell Hotel and the Bank on the line of Jehu Lane - therefore I don't believe that there is any trace of Jehu Lane which has a modern thoroughfare following it.

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I am sure that it was Jews walk ,,,,,,, not Jew Lane or as stated Jehu lane ,,,,, I used to deliver to the back of the restaurant of Fitzalan Square Indus ?

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I am sure that it was Jews walk ,,,,,,, not Jew Lane or as stated Jehu lane ,,,,, I used to deliver to the back of the restaurant of Fitzalan Square Indus ?

Topic merged

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